Polls

Is there an unsecured wireless network near you?
 
Comcast restores broadband in Oakland after cables 'peppered' with holes from drive-by shooting
Tuesday, 01 February 2022 11:00

HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:00:04 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/bcc8b2474388bb3b60f85a520a66a3d8279a895a/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/d5fab68fd3a8947ef69ea0c5f10a32f4af736926/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/d5fab68fd3a8947ef69ea0c5f10a32f4af736926/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:00:04 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6d673d9e4ea35ab4-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400 California Comcast Xfinity cable outage blamed on gunfire • The Register

Bullet-proof hosting? Can't help you there. Will you settle for rapid repairs?


Comcast Xfinity technicians have restored service to customers in Oakland, California, after the cableco's cables were pierced by gunfire early Sunday morning.

"The outage lasted from morning to early evening yesterday," Comcast California spokesperson Joan Hammel told The Register in an email, noting that the number of people affected fluctuated from 15,000 to 20,000.

The broadband service disruption came at a particularly bad time because it coincided with the widely watched NFC Championship Game between the Los Angeles Rams and the San Francisco 49ers.

The Oakland Police Department (OPD) told The Register in a statement that there is an ongoing investigation into an apparent drive-by shooting that occurred at 0330 PST on Sunday near the 6800 block of MacArthur Boulevard.

"Officers were dispatched to a ShotSpotter activation for 17 rounds," the OPD's said in its statement. "Upon arrival, officers located multiple casings, but did not locate anything struck. Video surveillance was recovered from the area showing an individual in a vehicle firing multiple rounds out of their window, into the air. There are no further details available at this time."

The OPD has asked anyone with information about the incident to get in touch with its Felony Assault Unit at (510) 238-3426.

The shot-up cabling in Oakland ... Source: Comcast. Click to enlarge

Hammel provided The Register with a copy of a photo taken at the intersection of 69th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd showing one of the many bullet holes noted by technicians. "Our team says the fiber was 'peppered' with holes," she said. "Residents also say they heard multiple gunshots at 0000 and again at 0300."

Hammel said Comcast personnel became aware of the situation somewhere between 0500 and 0800 on Sunday, adding that the company is cooperating fully with authorities to assist with the investigation. No injuries were reported in conjunction with the hail of bullets.

While gunfire isn't a common cause of network outages, it's not unheard of, at least in the US. On New Year's Day, bullets reportedly damaged Comcast network cables at two nearby locations in Rockford, Illinois. The affected cables are said to have been repaired by the following day. ®


Other stories you might like

Analysis Intel is cranking up its research spending to fix past mistakes, catch up with and overtake the competition, and build a foundation to grow in future.

The US giant spent $15.19bn on research and development in fiscal 2021, more than 20 per cent of the company's $74.7bn revenue. That was about a 12 per cent increase from research and investments in 2020, and it was largest year-over-year increase since 2012, when R&D spending went up by 20 per cent.

Compare that to recent years, when research and development spending was stagnant or barely increased and Chipzilla spent billions on stock price support instead. Enter CEO Pat Gelsinger, who took the reins last year and hit the reset button on Intel's priorities to focus on engineering.

Continue readingWebsite fined by German court for leaking visitor's IP address via Google Fonts Now that's egg on your typeface

Earlier this month, a German court fined an unidentified website €100 ($110, £84) for violating EU privacy law by importing a Google-hosted web font.

The decision, by Landgericht München's third civil chamber in Munich, found that the website, by including Google-Fonts-hosted font on its pages, passed the unidentified plaintiff's IP address to Google without authorization and without a legitimate reason for doing so. And that violates Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

That is to say, when the plaintiff visited the website, the page made the user's browser fetch a font from Google Fonts to use for some text, and this disclosed the netizen's IP address to the US internet giant. This kind of hot-linking is normal with Google Fonts; the issue here is that the visitor apparently didn't give permission for their IP address to be shared. The website could have avoided this drama by self-hosting the font, if possible.

Continue readingThere's a new Chipzilla in town: Samsung topples Intel to become largest chip maker Semiconductor shortage helps cause reshuffle at the top

The semiconductor shortage helped smartphone and memory chips in 2021, and Samsung toppled Intel to become the world's largest chip company, according to Counterpoint Research.

Overall semiconductor revenue grew to $554.1bn in 2021, with 19 per cent growth coming from the memory and integrated circuit (IC) design sectors, the research outfit said in a study.

This was driven by demand for ICs in data centers, high-performance computing, autonomous vehicles, 5G infrastructure, crypto, gaming and growing advanced semiconductors in PCs, smartphones and other IoT devices, Akshara Bassi, research analyst at Counterpoint, told The Register.

Continue reading

Chromebook shipments collapsed in calendar Q4 as the channel – with an eye on market saturation – ordered in lower volumes and PC makers moved available components to higher-margin builds running on Windows.

Unit sales into distributors and retailers plunged 63.6 per cent globally to 4.8 million Chromebooks, says IDC. This is the second quarter in a row that sales of the skinny portables have shrunk.

"Much of the initial demand for Chromebooks has been satiated in primary markets like the US and Europe and this has led to a slowdown in overall shipments," said Jitesh Ubrani, research manager at IDC.

Continue readingWorkday gets £9.8m deal for second chunk of UK's Student Loans Company project Oracle replacement project continues as SLC opts for SaaS model

Workday has pocketed a £9.8m contract for the second phase in an ERP project intended to improve efficiency in finance and HR management at the UK's Student Loans Company (SLC).

According to a contract award notice, the US SaaS application vendor has won the deal for "provision of Workday ERP software licences and associated services."

In its annual report published earlier this month, SLC - an executive non-departmental public body - said it was working on the second stage of its Workday implementation.

Continue readingCitrix acquired by private equity, will be paired with Tibco in $16.5bn deal Go-private deal with gang it previously bought Wrike from

Citrix is to be acquired by Vista Equity Partners and Evergreen Coast Capital in a deal worth $16.5bn. The move will see Citrix taken into private ownership and combined with Tibco, another firm already in Vista's portfolio.

Under the terms of the agreement announced today, Citrix shareholders will receive $104 per share, a price which represents a premium of 24 per cent over the over the closing price on December 20, the last trading day before rumours began to leak regarding a potential takeover.

Citrix also put out its financial results for the fourth quarter of its fiscal year 2021 today, reporting revenue of $851m compared to $810m for the same quarter in 2020, representing 5 per cent growth.

Continue reading
  • UK's new Brexit Freedom Bill promises already-slated GDPR reform, easier gene editing rules Claims it will make it easier to amend ‘retained EU law’

    The UK government is having a second pass at flogging the benefits of Brexit, as much as they exist, in a new bill that promises to accelerate work on AI and gene editing.

    The so-called Brexit Freedoms Bill — its actual title will be decided by Parliamentary clerks — will also offer a "more agile way to regulate new digital markets and AI and [create] a more proportionate and less burdensome data rights regime compared to the EU's General Data Protection Directive."

    The bill promises to make it easier to amend or remove "retained EU law" which was left in place following the UK's departure from the political and trading bloc.

    Continue reading
  • Waymo sues California's DMV to block autonomous car crash data from publication Plus: Non-profit suicide hotline criticised for sharing mental health crisis texts with AI startup, and more

    In brief Waymo is suing California's Department of Motor Vehicles in an attempt to keep information about its autonomous car crashes and other operational details private, arguing that the data is a trade secret.

    California's DMV is strict about giving permits to companies testing self-driving cars on real roads. Companies have to disclose operational and safety data before they're approved to drive in the state. But Waymo doesn't want that kind of information getting out.

    The DMV received a request for public record of Waymo's self-driving car test permit application filed last year. Waymo sent the department a redacted version to give, but the person requesting the information challenged the redactions. The DMV then notified Waymo it was going to hand over the unredacted report unless the company "sought an injunction prohibiting disclosure of the material in unredacted form" by January 31, 2022, according to the lawsuit [PDF].

    Continue reading
  • Sure, the James Webb Space Telescope is cool and all. But try making one out of Lego Next: How to throw it a million miles without anything falling off

    A double helping of plastic playtime this Monday as we honour the achievements of the James Webb Space Telescope by building one out of Lego and an ESA astronaut takes some Playmobil on a tour of the ISS.

    Having constructed many examples of spacecraft and their infrastructure, the unfolding of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and its successful insertion into L2 orbit seemed as good an excuse as any to raid the boxes of plastic bricks once more in tribute to the observatory and the brains behind it.

    Continue reading
  • Ever-growing volumes of data mean computational storage is becoming crucial for HPC, say boffins at Dell's tech chinwag Data at rest should remain at rest

    Dell believes that technologies such as computational storage will soon play a part in high-performance computing (HPC) in response to ever-growing volumes of data. It doesn't see the general-purpose CPU disappearing any time soon, but says it will be complemented with specialised processors for specific tasks, with composability seen as both an opportunity and a problem.

    Dell Technologies holds regular online sessions for its HPC Community, and the latest saw experts from the company discussing how HPC and mainstream enterprise IT feed off each other and where this may lead to, with advances in one sector often being picked up by the other.

    Most modern HPC systems are now built from clusters of commodity servers, for example, while the use of GPUs for accelerating complex workloads started in HPC research labs and is now filtering into enterprise data centres.

    Continue reading
  • Machine learning the hard way: IBM Watson's fatal misdiagnosis The doctor won't see you now

    Opinion It started in Jeopardy and ended in loss. IBM's flagship AI Watson Health has been sold to venture capitalists for an undisclosed sum thought to be around a billion dollars, or a quarter of what the division cost IBM in acquisitions alone since it was spun off in 2015.

    Not the first nor the last massively expensive tech biz screw-up, but isn't AI supposed to be the future? Isn't IBM supposed to be good at this?

    It all started so well. One of Watson's early set pieces was taking a complex set of symptoms and finding the most probable diagnosis out of an encyclopaedic knowledge of rare diseases. A different challenge marked its demise. Like a corpse with a broken neck, 15 bullet holes and a strong smell of cyanide, it raised the question: which massive failure actually finished it off?

    Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:00:04 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/bcc8b2474388bb3b60f85a520a66a3d8279a895a/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/d5fab68fd3a8947ef69ea0c5f10a32f4af736926/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/d5fab68fd3a8947ef69ea0c5f10a32f4af736926/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:00:04 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6d673d9e4ea35ab4-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400 California Comcast Xfinity cable outage blamed on gunfire • The Register

Bullet-proof hosting? Can't help you there. Will you settle for rapid repairs?


Comcast Xfinity technicians have restored service to customers in Oakland, California, after the cableco's cables were pierced by gunfire early Sunday morning.

"The outage lasted from morning to early evening yesterday," Comcast California spokesperson Joan Hammel told The Register in an email, noting that the number of people affected fluctuated from 15,000 to 20,000.

The broadband service disruption came at a particularly bad time because it coincided with the widely watched NFC Championship Game between the Los Angeles Rams and the San Francisco 49ers.

The Oakland Police Department (OPD) told The Register in a statement that there is an ongoing investigation into an apparent drive-by shooting that occurred at 0330 PST on Sunday near the 6800 block of MacArthur Boulevard.

"Officers were dispatched to a ShotSpotter activation for 17 rounds," the OPD's said in its statement. "Upon arrival, officers located multiple casings, but did not locate anything struck. Video surveillance was recovered from the area showing an individual in a vehicle firing multiple rounds out of their window, into the air. There are no further details available at this time."

The OPD has asked anyone with information about the incident to get in touch with its Felony Assault Unit at (510) 238-3426.

Comcast restores broadband in Oakland after cables 'peppered' with holes from drive-by shooting

The shot-up cabling in Oakland ... Source: Comcast. Click to enlarge

Hammel provided The Register with a copy of a photo taken at the intersection of 69th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd showing one of the many bullet holes noted by technicians. "Our team says the fiber was 'peppered' with holes," she said. "Residents also say they heard multiple gunshots at 0000 and again at 0300."

Hammel said Comcast personnel became aware of the situation somewhere between 0500 and 0800 on Sunday, adding that the company is cooperating fully with authorities to assist with the investigation. No injuries were reported in conjunction with the hail of bullets.

While gunfire isn't a common cause of network outages, it's not unheard of, at least in the US. On New Year's Day, bullets reportedly damaged Comcast network cables at two nearby locations in Rockford, Illinois. The affected cables are said to have been repaired by the following day. ®


Other stories you might like

Analysis Intel is cranking up its research spending to fix past mistakes, catch up with and overtake the competition, and build a foundation to grow in future.

The US giant spent $15.19bn on research and development in fiscal 2021, more than 20 per cent of the company's $74.7bn revenue. That was about a 12 per cent increase from research and investments in 2020, and it was largest year-over-year increase since 2012, when R&D spending went up by 20 per cent.

Compare that to recent years, when research and development spending was stagnant or barely increased and Chipzilla spent billions on stock price support instead. Enter CEO Pat Gelsinger, who took the reins last year and hit the reset button on Intel's priorities to focus on engineering.

Continue readingWebsite fined by German court for leaking visitor's IP address via Google Fonts Now that's egg on your typeface

Earlier this month, a German court fined an unidentified website €100 ($110, £84) for violating EU privacy law by importing a Google-hosted web font.

The decision, by Landgericht München's third civil chamber in Munich, found that the website, by including Google-Fonts-hosted font on its pages, passed the unidentified plaintiff's IP address to Google without authorization and without a legitimate reason for doing so. And that violates Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

That is to say, when the plaintiff visited the website, the page made the user's browser fetch a font from Google Fonts to use for some text, and this disclosed the netizen's IP address to the US internet giant. This kind of hot-linking is normal with Google Fonts; the issue here is that the visitor apparently didn't give permission for their IP address to be shared. The website could have avoided this drama by self-hosting the font, if possible.

Continue readingThere's a new Chipzilla in town: Samsung topples Intel to become largest chip maker Semiconductor shortage helps cause reshuffle at the top

The semiconductor shortage helped smartphone and memory chips in 2021, and Samsung toppled Intel to become the world's largest chip company, according to Counterpoint Research.

Overall semiconductor revenue grew to $554.1bn in 2021, with 19 per cent growth coming from the memory and integrated circuit (IC) design sectors, the research outfit said in a study.

This was driven by demand for ICs in data centers, high-performance computing, autonomous vehicles, 5G infrastructure, crypto, gaming and growing advanced semiconductors in PCs, smartphones and other IoT devices, Akshara Bassi, research analyst at Counterpoint, told The Register.

Continue reading

Chromebook shipments collapsed in calendar Q4 as the channel – with an eye on market saturation – ordered in lower volumes and PC makers moved available components to higher-margin builds running on Windows.

Unit sales into distributors and retailers plunged 63.6 per cent globally to 4.8 million Chromebooks, says IDC. This is the second quarter in a row that sales of the skinny portables have shrunk.

"Much of the initial demand for Chromebooks has been satiated in primary markets like the US and Europe and this has led to a slowdown in overall shipments," said Jitesh Ubrani, research manager at IDC.

Continue readingWorkday gets £9.8m deal for second chunk of UK's Student Loans Company project Oracle replacement project continues as SLC opts for SaaS model

Workday has pocketed a £9.8m contract for the second phase in an ERP project intended to improve efficiency in finance and HR management at the UK's Student Loans Company (SLC).

According to a contract award notice, the US SaaS application vendor has won the deal for "provision of Workday ERP software licences and associated services."

In its annual report published earlier this month, SLC - an executive non-departmental public body - said it was working on the second stage of its Workday implementation.

Continue readingCitrix acquired by private equity, will be paired with Tibco in $16.5bn deal Go-private deal with gang it previously bought Wrike from

Citrix is to be acquired by Vista Equity Partners and Evergreen Coast Capital in a deal worth $16.5bn. The move will see Citrix taken into private ownership and combined with Tibco, another firm already in Vista's portfolio.

Under the terms of the agreement announced today, Citrix shareholders will receive $104 per share, a price which represents a premium of 24 per cent over the over the closing price on December 20, the last trading day before rumours began to leak regarding a potential takeover.

Citrix also put out its financial results for the fourth quarter of its fiscal year 2021 today, reporting revenue of $851m compared to $810m for the same quarter in 2020, representing 5 per cent growth.

Continue reading
  • UK's new Brexit Freedom Bill promises already-slated GDPR reform, easier gene editing rules Claims it will make it easier to amend ‘retained EU law’

    The UK government is having a second pass at flogging the benefits of Brexit, as much as they exist, in a new bill that promises to accelerate work on AI and gene editing.

    The so-called Brexit Freedoms Bill — its actual title will be decided by Parliamentary clerks — will also offer a "more agile way to regulate new digital markets and AI and [create] a more proportionate and less burdensome data rights regime compared to the EU's General Data Protection Directive."

    The bill promises to make it easier to amend or remove "retained EU law" which was left in place following the UK's departure from the political and trading bloc.

    Continue reading
  • Waymo sues California's DMV to block autonomous car crash data from publication Plus: Non-profit suicide hotline criticised for sharing mental health crisis texts with AI startup, and more

    In brief Waymo is suing California's Department of Motor Vehicles in an attempt to keep information about its autonomous car crashes and other operational details private, arguing that the data is a trade secret.

    California's DMV is strict about giving permits to companies testing self-driving cars on real roads. Companies have to disclose operational and safety data before they're approved to drive in the state. But Waymo doesn't want that kind of information getting out.

    The DMV received a request for public record of Waymo's self-driving car test permit application filed last year. Waymo sent the department a redacted version to give, but the person requesting the information challenged the redactions. The DMV then notified Waymo it was going to hand over the unredacted report unless the company "sought an injunction prohibiting disclosure of the material in unredacted form" by January 31, 2022, according to the lawsuit [PDF].

    Continue reading
  • Sure, the James Webb Space Telescope is cool and all. But try making one out of Lego Next: How to throw it a million miles without anything falling off

    A double helping of plastic playtime this Monday as we honour the achievements of the James Webb Space Telescope by building one out of Lego and an ESA astronaut takes some Playmobil on a tour of the ISS.

    Having constructed many examples of spacecraft and their infrastructure, the unfolding of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and its successful insertion into L2 orbit seemed as good an excuse as any to raid the boxes of plastic bricks once more in tribute to the observatory and the brains behind it.

    Continue reading
  • Ever-growing volumes of data mean computational storage is becoming crucial for HPC, say boffins at Dell's tech chinwag Data at rest should remain at rest

    Dell believes that technologies such as computational storage will soon play a part in high-performance computing (HPC) in response to ever-growing volumes of data. It doesn't see the general-purpose CPU disappearing any time soon, but says it will be complemented with specialised processors for specific tasks, with composability seen as both an opportunity and a problem.

    Dell Technologies holds regular online sessions for its HPC Community, and the latest saw experts from the company discussing how HPC and mainstream enterprise IT feed off each other and where this may lead to, with advances in one sector often being picked up by the other.

    Most modern HPC systems are now built from clusters of commodity servers, for example, while the use of GPUs for accelerating complex workloads started in HPC research labs and is now filtering into enterprise data centres.

    Continue reading
  • Machine learning the hard way: IBM Watson's fatal misdiagnosis The doctor won't see you now

    Opinion It started in Jeopardy and ended in loss. IBM's flagship AI Watson Health has been sold to venture capitalists for an undisclosed sum thought to be around a billion dollars, or a quarter of what the division cost IBM in acquisitions alone since it was spun off in 2015.

    Not the first nor the last massively expensive tech biz screw-up, but isn't AI supposed to be the future? Isn't IBM supposed to be good at this?

    It all started so well. One of Watson's early set pieces was taking a complex set of symptoms and finding the most probable diagnosis out of an encyclopaedic knowledge of rare diseases. A different challenge marked its demise. Like a corpse with a broken neck, 15 bullet holes and a strong smell of cyanide, it raised the question: which massive failure actually finished it off?

    Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3AMAWn6