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Apple seeks geniuses to work on 6G cellular modem before it's even shipped own 5G chip
Thursday, 04 November 2021 19:04

HTTP/2 103 link: ; as="script"; rel="preload", /f056399b37a7c31ffd1fda6509028514bcde55e9/javascript/_.js>; as="script"; rel="preload", /default/aec273bc80dd0dc3a73edce687f7cdaa0e9ef0f5/scaffolding.css>; as="style"; rel="preload", /default/aec273bc80dd0dc3a73edce687f7cdaa0e9ef0f5/design.css>; as="style"; rel="preload", /5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; as="font"; crossorigin; rel="preload", /5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; as="font"; crossorigin; rel="preload" HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 13:00:04 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/f056399b37a7c31ffd1fda6509028514bcde55e9/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/aec273bc80dd0dc3a73edce687f7cdaa0e9ef0f5/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/aec273bc80dd0dc3a73edce687f7cdaa0e9ef0f5/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 13:00:04 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6a8e05ec998e5a9c-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400, h3-28=":443"; ma=86400, h3-27=":443"; ma=86400 Apple is already trying to recruit experts for 6G modems • The Register

It's a good time to be a wireless communications architect or an AI engineer


Apple hasn't put homegrown 5G modems in its iPhones yet, but is already looking for a jump-start on 6G modems.

In the past few weeks, the Cupertino technology giant has posted job ads pointedly looking for talent that can put a 6G cellular modem into its product roadmap.

The "6G cellular platform architect" roles advertised here and here have a focus on developing reference and prototype 6G architectures as well as "implementing simulations and experiments to assess 6G technology candidates."

The job postings lift the lid off Apple's preliminary plans for developing and deploying 6G support plus its desire to use artificial intelligence in the design of modems and wireless electronics that can connect to 6G networks, which are themselves still in early stages of research.

Here are the key qualifications needed by applicants, according to Apple:

"A deep understanding of wireless systems, network architectures, and user applications and services is required," the iGiant continued. "Experience with technical planning and leading cross-functional system programs, building prototypes, and co-operating with internal and external partners is highly desired."

Apple, which has made a name for itself in processor and system-on-chip design alone lately, is working on its own internal 5G modems for its products to free itself of outside suppliers. It is using Qualcomm 5G modems in its latest iPhones, according to teardowns by iFixit.

AI skills highly sought

Earlier this week, Apple also posted job ads for machine-learning engineers who can put their knowledge of artificial intelligence to work in developing 5G and 6G network technology. Applicants need to be familiar with "wireless system optimization for augmented reality, virtual reality and automotive applications," according to the job posting.

It could be argued that Apple is looking at the possible use of 6G in a metaverse, which involves human avatars working, interacting, and playing with friends in a parallel digital universe, with machine-learning algorithms optimizing the connectivity behind it all.

No one at Apple was prepared to comment on the job postings nor the company's 6G modem plans. The iGiant has a few positions open for 5G and 6G engineers dating back to February, which remain listed.

Fully immersive VR and interactive holograms were also identified by Samsung as possible 6G applications albeit with caveats. Such super-next-gen applications would need network speeds peaking at 1 terabit per second, 50 times that of today's 5G networks, while latency would need to be 100 microseconds, which is 10 times better than 5G.

Samsung last week said it expects 6G to be deployed starting in 2030 on radio spectrum that includes terahertz and sub-terahertz bands. 6G will involve a melting pot of traditional wireline and wireless networks, which could include satellites and mobility networks for unmanned aerial vehicles and drones. The standard will be developed by 3GPP, which is behind 5G.

Apple's job postings for 6G cell modem engineers comes ahead of 3GPP's release for the next major technology upgrade to 5G, called 5G Advanced, early next year. One of the ads mentioned the engineer would be responsible for Apple's input to establishing 6G network standards.

The groundwork for faster and more reliable communication channels in 6G will start with 5G Advanced, which is expected to include a new duplexing scheme for technologies that include AI and machine learning, and applications such as VR.

Samsung is already researching technologies for reliable communications on higher spectrum, which can otherwise be flaky and prone to interference. ®

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WebAssembly's documentation describes the format's security goals, and boasts of its memory safety protection.

Continue readingFeeling the pinch? How about a 160% hike in your data centre fees Energy price rises trigger bigger bills at cloud and network provider M247

Think everything is getting more expensive these days? Spare a thought for customers of M247 on the receiving end of a 161 per cent uplift in charges, with rising energy prices blamed.

The business, based in the northwest of England, this week published a notification on its website headlined: "General Terms and Conditions Price Changes."

"From the 1st December 2021 there will be an uplift of 161%* to your Manchester Ball Green Data Centre Power rental and overage charges as per our T&Cs (*for services billed inclusive of both rack space and power, this uplift will only affgect 60% of your rental fee)," it states.

Continue readingDon't worry, the halo won't fade from the IT dept when this pandemic is over – because it was never there But let me tell ya, technology work is better than diggin' a ditch

Register DebateWelcome to the latest Register Debate in which writers discuss technology topics, and you the reader choose the winning argument. The format is simple: we propose a motion, the arguments for the motion will run this Monday and Wednesday, and the arguments against on Tuesday and Thursday. During the week you can cast your vote on which side you support using the poll embedded below, choosing whether you're in favour or against the motion. The final score will be announced on Friday, revealing whether the for or against argument was most popular.

It's up to our writers to convince you to vote for their side.

This week's motion is: The pandemic improved the status of the IT workers … forever.

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Comment As Firefox's share of the browser market continues to slide, the Waterfox Project shows some of the ways that Mozilla is failing to listen to its users – and it's far from the only example.

Waterfox, which has just released its fourth version, came to your correspondent's attention after the arrival of Firefox 57, codenamed Quantum, which represented a major change in the program, complete with parts of the browser engine written in Rust.

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Continue readingArista and Juniper hike prices as component lead times blow out to 80 weeks – that's May 2023 Cost of some supplies is up 200 per cent, so vendors start 'protecting margins'

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Continue readingCentOS Stream^W^W Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 emerges in beta form We're on a highway to RHEL

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Continue readingHPE picks Taiwan as 'global strategic hub for next-generation technology' Came for the people, the supply chain, and with hopes of building new servers, storage, HPC, and 5G kit. Don't mention the increasing geopolitical tension

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It's a good time to be a wireless communications architect or an AI engineer


Apple hasn't put homegrown 5G modems in its iPhones yet, but is already looking for a jump-start on 6G modems.

In the past few weeks, the Cupertino technology giant has posted job ads pointedly looking for talent that can put a 6G cellular modem into its product roadmap.

The "6G cellular platform architect" roles advertised here and here have a focus on developing reference and prototype 6G architectures as well as "implementing simulations and experiments to assess 6G technology candidates."

The job postings lift the lid off Apple's preliminary plans for developing and deploying 6G support plus its desire to use artificial intelligence in the design of modems and wireless electronics that can connect to 6G networks, which are themselves still in early stages of research.

Here are the key qualifications needed by applicants, according to Apple:

"A deep understanding of wireless systems, network architectures, and user applications and services is required," the iGiant continued. "Experience with technical planning and leading cross-functional system programs, building prototypes, and co-operating with internal and external partners is highly desired."

Apple, which has made a name for itself in processor and system-on-chip design alone lately, is working on its own internal 5G modems for its products to free itself of outside suppliers. It is using Qualcomm 5G modems in its latest iPhones, according to teardowns by iFixit.

AI skills highly sought

Earlier this week, Apple also posted job ads for machine-learning engineers who can put their knowledge of artificial intelligence to work in developing 5G and 6G network technology. Applicants need to be familiar with "wireless system optimization for augmented reality, virtual reality and automotive applications," according to the job posting.

It could be argued that Apple is looking at the possible use of 6G in a metaverse, which involves human avatars working, interacting, and playing with friends in a parallel digital universe, with machine-learning algorithms optimizing the connectivity behind it all.

No one at Apple was prepared to comment on the job postings nor the company's 6G modem plans. The iGiant has a few positions open for 5G and 6G engineers dating back to February, which remain listed.

Fully immersive VR and interactive holograms were also identified by Samsung as possible 6G applications albeit with caveats. Such super-next-gen applications would need network speeds peaking at 1 terabit per second, 50 times that of today's 5G networks, while latency would need to be 100 microseconds, which is 10 times better than 5G.

Samsung last week said it expects 6G to be deployed starting in 2030 on radio spectrum that includes terahertz and sub-terahertz bands. 6G will involve a melting pot of traditional wireline and wireless networks, which could include satellites and mobility networks for unmanned aerial vehicles and drones. The standard will be developed by 3GPP, which is behind 5G.

Apple's job postings for 6G cell modem engineers comes ahead of 3GPP's release for the next major technology upgrade to 5G, called 5G Advanced, early next year. One of the ads mentioned the engineer would be responsible for Apple's input to establishing 6G network standards.

The groundwork for faster and more reliable communication channels in 6G will start with 5G Advanced, which is expected to include a new duplexing scheme for technologies that include AI and machine learning, and applications such as VR.

Samsung is already researching technologies for reliable communications on higher spectrum, which can otherwise be flaky and prone to interference. ®

Similar topics


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WebAssembly has been promoted for its security benefits, though researchers in Belgium and New Zealand contend applications built in this binary format lack important protections.

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WebAssembly's documentation describes the format's security goals, and boasts of its memory safety protection.

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It's up to our writers to convince you to vote for their side.

This week's motion is: The pandemic improved the status of the IT workers … forever.

Continue reading

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Waterfox, which has just released its fourth version, came to your correspondent's attention after the arrival of Firefox 57, codenamed Quantum, which represented a major change in the program, complete with parts of the browser engine written in Rust.

(The Rust language itself started out as a Mozilla project. Despite Rust's popularity, within three years, Mozilla would also lay off members of the Rust language team.)

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Some of this amounts to a bunch of me-toos and catch-ups for software systems but the wares are nonetheless advancing in terms of scale and maturity.

First up is the promise that users might more easily skip between two big chunks of Microsoft areas: business applications and collaboration.

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NASA has selected a ridge close to Shackleton, a deep impact crater on the Moon's South Pole, to conduct its first-ever ice-water-mining expedition, which is expected to blast off late next year.

NASA has grand plans for the Moon. The gray ball of rock could, one day, house a base station for astronauts to stay and refuel their spacecraft as they prepare for missions further out into the Solar System. But before this vision can be fully realized, NASA is investigating what potential lunar resources can be extracted and what kind of technology is needed to support any future visitors. Finding water and sorting out communications will be key.

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Continue readingArista and Juniper hike prices as component lead times blow out to 80 weeks – that's May 2023 Cost of some supplies is up 200 per cent, so vendors start 'protecting margins'

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News of those very long lead times came to light in both vendors' recent earnings announcements and follows Cisco and HPE hiking prices due to industry-wide pandemic-related supply chain difficulties.

Juniper announced preliminary numbers last week. Q3 2021 revenue reached $1,188.8 million – up four points year over year. The company reported its order backlog is now over a billion dollars larger than it was at the end of FY2020.

Continue readingCentOS Stream^W^W Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 emerges in beta form We're on a highway to RHEL

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This version is due for official release in 2022. Its predecessor debuted in 2019, the year IBM closed the deal to acquire the Linux distro, and it right now stands at version 8.4, which was released in May 2021.

Red Hat's Gil Cattelain and Joe Brockmeier said: "RHEL 9 Beta is something of a departure from previous major releases of RHEL."

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The jolly green computing giant on Tuesday designated the island nation a "global strategic hub for next-generation technology", which translates into over 100 hires to existing labs to boost their ability to design servers and storage hardware. HPE says its plans will make the hotly contested country (or rogue province, according to China) its largest hardware design centre outside of the USA.

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The Ministry also objected to the decision on grounds that banning businesses without evidence isn't consistent with the usual practice of free market economies and called on the US government to rescind its decision.

Continue readingAzure Virtual Desktop on Azure Stack HCI – for those who want cloudy remote desktops hosted on-prem We drill into what's available in this public preview

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Azure Virtual Desktop (AVD) provides remote Windows desktops, and it predates the introduction this year of Windows 365.

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Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3wjHKq3