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Huawei appears to have quenched its thirst for power in favour of more efficient 5G
Thursday, 21 October 2021 19:36

HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 22 Oct 2021 01:00:12 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/bea9b94002d2e721422add584a7f2257d5de42ae/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/6722acdbdc365069edd7f1a74756c9c64ecb0143/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/6722acdbdc365069edd7f1a74756c9c64ecb0143/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 22 Oct 2021 01:00:12 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6a1ec992d9065aac-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400, h3-28=":443"; ma=86400, h3-27=":443"; ma=86400 Huawei changes tack to push efficiency in 5G over raw power • The Register

Never mind the performance, man, think of the planet


MBB Forum 2021 The "G" in 5G stands for Green, if the hours of keynotes at the Mobile Broadband Forum in Dubai are to be believed.

Run by Huawei, the forum was a mixture of in-person event and talking heads over occasionally grainy video and kicked off with an admission by Ken Hu, rotating chairman of the Shenzhen-based electronics giant, that the adoption of 5G – with its promise of faster speeds, higher bandwidth and lower latency – was still quite low for some applications.

Despite the dream five years ago, that the tech would link up everything, "we have not connected all things," Hu said.

Click to enlarge

It was a refreshingly frank assessment, sandwiched between the usual cheerleading for 5G. A distinct change of tack could be detected from the normal trumpeting of raw performance to an acknowledgement that power consumption would need to be reduced amid concerns about efficiency.

On that note, we'll draw a veil over the fact that the event's host Dubai features an indoor ski slope on the edge of a desert.

Hu ticked off a shopping list of things that hadn't quite happened in the 5G world just yet – there are now 10,000 "5GtoB" projects in the world, but more than half are in China and industry has yet to see its promised redefinition. 5GtoB is Huawei's B2B 5G services punt, which includes a network, a NaaS offering, a 5G app engine, and a marketplace.

There had been great hopes for virtual reality and 360° broadcasting, but neither had taken off. And so it went on.

That said, Hu also noted faster-than-expected growth in some areas, claiming over 1.5 million base stations and 176 commercial 5G networks were up and running along with more than half a billion 5G users (smartphone users and industry modules).

Hu also reckoned plenty of opportunities lay ahead. The pandemic had accelerated digital transformation by approximately seven years, he said, and consumers had hopped online and were voraciously consuming services such as video streaming. As well as the increasing trend toward cloud applications, there was a demand for decent wireless home broadband.

Fertile ground for 5G and 5.5G, for sure.

Getting latency down to 10ms and upping the bandwidth are key said Hu as he wheeled out the industry buzzword of the moment: the metaverse. After all, if AR and VR haven't taken off as hoped, there is always extended reality or XR.

And then there is a growing awareness among the population that perhaps shoving yet more power-hungry gizmos into data centres might not be the best approach. But hey – Huawei has just the 5G (and 5.5G) and networking tech for that, assuming you live in a country that hasn't banned its tech.

"We can't do anything about that," a spokesperson told The Register with a hint of a smile.

Huawei's kit is famously being pulled out of UK networks amid mistrust of the Chinese government, although it continues to install its telecommunications technology elsewhere. As well as telco representatives from the Middle East, the likes of Vodafone turned up via video link to extol the virtues of 5G.

Konstantinos Masselos, President of Greece's Hellenic Telecommunications & Post Commission, spoke in person about spectrum strategy, even as the backdrop behind him strobed like a ZX Spectrum loading screen.

Huawei Inside, but Batteries Not Included

Naturally, Huawei was keen to show off its other toys. The AR and XR department was taken care of by a display showing a customer garbed in virtual traditional attire thanks to a Azure Kinect DK camera and a big screen. An electric car was also on show, hoped to be a showcase for Huawei's dream of a connected automobile world, but sadly lacking the battery thanks to problems getting the units shipped into the UAE. There's perhaps a metaphor in there somewhere…

5G technology is critical for Huawei as the company faces sanctions around the world. The banhammer was dropped in the UK last year, prohibiting telcos from purchasing its kit and removing what had already been installed by 2027. US sanctions have played a role in a decline in the company's revenues as components have become difficult to source for products such as smartphones. That said, back in August, rotating chairman Eric Xu remained bullish about the company's enterprise and carrier business (excluding the likes of the UK, of course).

While some countries might regard Huawei with some suspicion, others appear more than happy to fit out data centres with its tech – poor firmware engineering processes or not.

Overall, the theme of the 2021 Mobile Broadband Forum was a recognition that the world had changed in the last two years. Raw performance seemed to take a back seat to the potential for power savings and efficiency improvements as old kit gradually gets replaced with new over the coming years.

While XR might seem a contender for next year's hypewagon, a renewed emphasis on industry applications and standards for 5G seems a good deal more realistic. ®

The Register attended MBBF 2021 as a guest of Huawei.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 22 Oct 2021 01:00:12 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/bea9b94002d2e721422add584a7f2257d5de42ae/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/6722acdbdc365069edd7f1a74756c9c64ecb0143/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/6722acdbdc365069edd7f1a74756c9c64ecb0143/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 22 Oct 2021 01:00:12 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6a1ec992d9065aac-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400, h3-28=":443"; ma=86400, h3-27=":443"; ma=86400 Huawei changes tack to push efficiency in 5G over raw power • The Register

Never mind the performance, man, think of the planet


MBB Forum 2021 The "G" in 5G stands for Green, if the hours of keynotes at the Mobile Broadband Forum in Dubai are to be believed.

Run by Huawei, the forum was a mixture of in-person event and talking heads over occasionally grainy video and kicked off with an admission by Ken Hu, rotating chairman of the Shenzhen-based electronics giant, that the adoption of 5G – with its promise of faster speeds, higher bandwidth and lower latency – was still quite low for some applications.

Despite the dream five years ago, that the tech would link up everything, "we have not connected all things," Hu said.

Huawei appears to have quenched its thirst for power in favour of more efficient 5G

Click to enlarge

It was a refreshingly frank assessment, sandwiched between the usual cheerleading for 5G. A distinct change of tack could be detected from the normal trumpeting of raw performance to an acknowledgement that power consumption would need to be reduced amid concerns about efficiency.

On that note, we'll draw a veil over the fact that the event's host Dubai features an indoor ski slope on the edge of a desert.

Hu ticked off a shopping list of things that hadn't quite happened in the 5G world just yet – there are now 10,000 "5GtoB" projects in the world, but more than half are in China and industry has yet to see its promised redefinition. 5GtoB is Huawei's B2B 5G services punt, which includes a network, a NaaS offering, a 5G app engine, and a marketplace.

There had been great hopes for virtual reality and 360° broadcasting, but neither had taken off. And so it went on.

That said, Hu also noted faster-than-expected growth in some areas, claiming over 1.5 million base stations and 176 commercial 5G networks were up and running along with more than half a billion 5G users (smartphone users and industry modules).

Hu also reckoned plenty of opportunities lay ahead. The pandemic had accelerated digital transformation by approximately seven years, he said, and consumers had hopped online and were voraciously consuming services such as video streaming. As well as the increasing trend toward cloud applications, there was a demand for decent wireless home broadband.

Fertile ground for 5G and 5.5G, for sure.

Getting latency down to 10ms and upping the bandwidth are key said Hu as he wheeled out the industry buzzword of the moment: the metaverse. After all, if AR and VR haven't taken off as hoped, there is always extended reality or XR.

And then there is a growing awareness among the population that perhaps shoving yet more power-hungry gizmos into data centres might not be the best approach. But hey – Huawei has just the 5G (and 5.5G) and networking tech for that, assuming you live in a country that hasn't banned its tech.

"We can't do anything about that," a spokesperson told The Register with a hint of a smile.

Huawei's kit is famously being pulled out of UK networks amid mistrust of the Chinese government, although it continues to install its telecommunications technology elsewhere. As well as telco representatives from the Middle East, the likes of Vodafone turned up via video link to extol the virtues of 5G.

Konstantinos Masselos, President of Greece's Hellenic Telecommunications & Post Commission, spoke in person about spectrum strategy, even as the backdrop behind him strobed like a ZX Spectrum loading screen.

Huawei Inside, but Batteries Not Included

Naturally, Huawei was keen to show off its other toys. The AR and XR department was taken care of by a display showing a customer garbed in virtual traditional attire thanks to a Azure Kinect DK camera and a big screen. An electric car was also on show, hoped to be a showcase for Huawei's dream of a connected automobile world, but sadly lacking the battery thanks to problems getting the units shipped into the UAE. There's perhaps a metaphor in there somewhere…

5G technology is critical for Huawei as the company faces sanctions around the world. The banhammer was dropped in the UK last year, prohibiting telcos from purchasing its kit and removing what had already been installed by 2027. US sanctions have played a role in a decline in the company's revenues as components have become difficult to source for products such as smartphones. That said, back in August, rotating chairman Eric Xu remained bullish about the company's enterprise and carrier business (excluding the likes of the UK, of course).

While some countries might regard Huawei with some suspicion, others appear more than happy to fit out data centres with its tech – poor firmware engineering processes or not.

Overall, the theme of the 2021 Mobile Broadband Forum was a recognition that the world had changed in the last two years. Raw performance seemed to take a back seat to the potential for power savings and efficiency improvements as old kit gradually gets replaced with new over the coming years.

While XR might seem a contender for next year's hypewagon, a renewed emphasis on industry applications and standards for 5G seems a good deal more realistic. ®

The Register attended MBBF 2021 as a guest of Huawei.

Similar topics


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America's Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) said on Thursday it is probing some of the biggest names in the electronic payments industry, requesting detailed information from them on how they collect and use people's spending data.

A strings of demands was issued by the government watchdog to Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, PayPal, and Square, said CFPB Director Rohit Chopra, and more could be sent to others. In addition, the agency is also looking into Chinese payment providers WeChat Pay and Alipay, saying the duo are "combining messaging, e-commerce and payment functionality into super-apps," which America's internet goliaths may try to imitate.

“Big Tech companies are eagerly expanding their empires to gain greater control and insight into our spending habits,” said Chopra in a statement [PDF]. “We have ordered them to produce information about their business plans and practices.”

Continue readingWe're closing the gap with Arm and x86, claims SiFive: New RISC-V CPU core for PCs, servers, mobile incoming As it appears Intel's attempt to gobble the upstart collapses

SiFive reckons its fastest RISC-V processor core yet is closing the gap on being a mainstream computing alternative to x86 and Arm.

The yet-unnamed high-performance design is within reach of Intel's Rocket Lake family, introduced in March, and Arm's Cortex-A78 design, announced last year, in terms of single-core performance, James Prior, senior director of product marketing and communications at SiFive, told The Register.

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Employees have been told to declare whether they’ve been vaccinated or not by October 24, Bloomberg reported this week. Staff who choose not to disclose their vaccination status will be subjected to COVID-19 testing whenever they enter the office, it's said.

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Continue reading

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Previously, Android developers selling digital subscriptions in their apps endured the 30 per cent rate during the first year, after which the fee percentage would be halved.

The revised price structure, which takes effect January, 2022, puts more pressure on Apple to further trim its iOS fee schedule, already dented by legal and regulatory pressure. Apple currently follows Google's old model of 30 per cent for auto-renewable subscriptions, dropping to 15 per cent after a year.

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"I will be moving across the country from Silicon Valley to Orlando to work for Luminar where I will head up development of their amazing next generation Computer Vision and Lidar products focused on making cars and trucks safer," Grunnet-Jepsen said in a note sent via a Luminar representative.

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While a vuln in version 5.7 of WinRAR may not seem like an immediate threat given that version was first released two years ago and has been superseded since, simple shareware/free-to-use software has a habit of being used long after its due date.

The vuln, tracked as CVE-2021-35052, has since been patched. Users should check their installed versions of WinRAR and update if it isn't v 6.02 or later, though the practicality of the attack seems limited unless your device or network is first compromised by other means.

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At 5pm local time (UTC+9), the rocket, named Nuri, or KSLV-II, left its launchpad at Naro Space Center, destined for low-Earth orbit with a 1.5-ton dummy payload. But while all the three stages of the Korea Space Launch Vehicle II worked and the initial payload separation was fine, the dummy satellite was not placed into orbit as planned.

It wasn't immediately clear what went wrong, although South Korean President Moon Jae-in, speaking from the Naro spaceport, said the payload did not stabilize in orbit after separation. It appears the rocket's third-stage engine stopping running after 475 seconds, about 50 seconds earlier than planned, leading to the failed deployment.

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Although Amazon Chime has a relatively small market share in the crowded videoconferencing market, the Chime SDK is convenient for developers building applications that include videoconferencing or messaging, competing with SDKs and services from the likes of Twilio or Microsoft's Azure Communication Services. In other words, this is aimed mainly at corporate developers building applications or websites that include real-time messaging, audio or videoconferencing.

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The buying spree, which will officially begin when a framework agreement starts in fiscal 2023, involves a large spread of hardware, software and services around IT networks. Included are categories such as networking, internet and intranet software packages, network interfaces, network operating system software development services and so on.

Crown Commercial Service, the cross-government buying organisation that sits within the Cabinet Office, has launched what is known as a "prior information notice" to start talking to suppliers before it forms the official competition to be on the framework: a group of contracted suppliers from which a huge number of public sector bodies can buy.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3b186Dq