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UK's VoIP Unlimited hit by DDoSes again, weeks after ransom-linked attacks KO'd it
Saturday, 09 October 2021 00:34

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Outage prompts customer ire, again


A British VoIP firm has staggered back to its feet after being smacked with a series of apparent DDoSes a month after suffering a series of sustained attacks it said were delivered by the REvil ransomware gang.

In an update at 11:56 UK time, it said it was "continuing to suffer from large scale DDoS attacks. VoIP Unlimited engineers are continuing to mitigate the impact on services."

Voip Unlimited's services went down in September at the time of the initial attack, with managing director Mark Pillow saying at the time he was "extremely sorry for all inconvenience caused".

The downtime yesterday and this morning came about after "an alarmingly large and sophisticated DDoS attack attached to a colossal ransom demand" which it said it believed was sent by the REvil ransomware gang – which had apparently attacked other UK VoIP providers at the same time.

Voip Unlimited declined to comment today. At the time of writing some of its services had come back online.

A Reg reader who is a customer of the firm told us last night that issues "started at about 15:30 [yesterday] as intermittent connectivity - it's now ramping up to complete loss of service."

Another told us "Voip Exchange and Data connectivity customers" were being targeted with "some services seemingly being impacted since Wednesday".

Although REvil is best known for distributing ransomware, which infects a target organisation's network and encrypts its contents, extortion-based DDoSes are a relatively new pivot for the criminal gang. What appears to be the same criminal gang targeted a Canadian firm in mid-September, calling itself REvil and demanding 1 bitcoin (at the time worth $45,000) to stop the attacks.

Infosec firm Cyjax reckoned a free decrpytor for REvil's flagship ransomware was released in mid-September, providing a possible clue about why the gang has added old-fashioned RDoSing to its criminal portfolio. Naturally, it's not impossible that an enterprising group of cybercrims are trading off REvil's reputation for their own gain.

Ransom denial-of-service (RDoS) attacks are gradually scaling up across the world. The attack form revolves around the availability of DDoSaaSes (DDoS as-a-service services), known on a smaller scale as booters. Large-scale DDoSes tend to need large botnets only available to bigger players who don't feel the need to rent out their infrastructure to others who might get it noticed and shut down; or those based in countries which don't care so long as the botnets aren't pointed inside their borders.

Infosec analysts at TrendMicro said in a recent report that multilevel extortion schemes were becoming increasingly common amongst ransomware makers. The firm described it as the third layer following "a straightforward formula: adding DDoS attacks to the ... encryption and data exposure threats." It said it was "first performed by SunCrypt and RagnarLocker operators in the latter half of 2020 and that REvil (aka Sodinokibi) was "also looking into including DDoS attacks in their extortion strategy" in June this year. ®

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Unlucky, or perhaps lucky, folks found themselves hitting errors when accessing parts of the social network as well as its Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger units. Attempts to view notifications, for instance, brought up the message: "Error performing query."

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HTTP/2 200 date: Sun, 10 Oct 2021 01:00:05 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/989492f909067b5d81680efe3059cfc27f887a7e/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/95ebdd1e1a12ac6c685ff53f8bff3bb0775226c2/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/95ebdd1e1a12ac6c685ff53f8bff3bb0775226c2/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Sun, 10 Oct 2021 01:00:05 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 69bbe8e4ae4717cb-MEL alt-svc: h3=":443"; ma=86400, h3-29=":443"; ma=86400, h3-28=":443"; ma=86400, h3-27=":443"; ma=86400 VoIP Unlimited hit by outage in wake of DDoS claims • The Register

Outage prompts customer ire, again


A British VoIP firm has staggered back to its feet after being smacked with a series of apparent DDoSes a month after suffering a series of sustained attacks it said were delivered by the REvil ransomware gang.

In an update at 11:56 UK time, it said it was "continuing to suffer from large scale DDoS attacks. VoIP Unlimited engineers are continuing to mitigate the impact on services."

Voip Unlimited's services went down in September at the time of the initial attack, with managing director Mark Pillow saying at the time he was "extremely sorry for all inconvenience caused".

The downtime yesterday and this morning came about after "an alarmingly large and sophisticated DDoS attack attached to a colossal ransom demand" which it said it believed was sent by the REvil ransomware gang – which had apparently attacked other UK VoIP providers at the same time.

Voip Unlimited declined to comment today. At the time of writing some of its services had come back online.

A Reg reader who is a customer of the firm told us last night that issues "started at about 15:30 [yesterday] as intermittent connectivity - it's now ramping up to complete loss of service."

Another told us "Voip Exchange and Data connectivity customers" were being targeted with "some services seemingly being impacted since Wednesday".

Although REvil is best known for distributing ransomware, which infects a target organisation's network and encrypts its contents, extortion-based DDoSes are a relatively new pivot for the criminal gang. What appears to be the same criminal gang targeted a Canadian firm in mid-September, calling itself REvil and demanding 1 bitcoin (at the time worth $45,000) to stop the attacks.

Infosec firm Cyjax reckoned a free decrpytor for REvil's flagship ransomware was released in mid-September, providing a possible clue about why the gang has added old-fashioned RDoSing to its criminal portfolio. Naturally, it's not impossible that an enterprising group of cybercrims are trading off REvil's reputation for their own gain.

Ransom denial-of-service (RDoS) attacks are gradually scaling up across the world. The attack form revolves around the availability of DDoSaaSes (DDoS as-a-service services), known on a smaller scale as booters. Large-scale DDoSes tend to need large botnets only available to bigger players who don't feel the need to rent out their infrastructure to others who might get it noticed and shut down; or those based in countries which don't care so long as the botnets aren't pointed inside their borders.

Infosec analysts at TrendMicro said in a recent report that multilevel extortion schemes were becoming increasingly common amongst ransomware makers. The firm described it as the third layer following "a straightforward formula: adding DDoS attacks to the ... encryption and data exposure threats." It said it was "first performed by SunCrypt and RagnarLocker operators in the latter half of 2020 and that REvil (aka Sodinokibi) was "also looking into including DDoS attacks in their extortion strategy" in June this year. ®

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Unlucky, or perhaps lucky, folks found themselves hitting errors when accessing parts of the social network as well as its Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger units. Attempts to view notifications, for instance, brought up the message: "Error performing query."

The services appear to be recovering, if they are not already recovered, after about an hour or two of disruption. Another configuration change was reportedly blamed.

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Designed for small and medium-sized businesses, the new range, which includes the T150, T550, T350, R250 and R350, is marketed for use either in edge environments, or in a data center. IT manager, take your pick.

Surprising nobody, the new entry-level servers use Intel Xeon processors, E-2300 processors to be exact. They are also equipped with what Dell calls "office-friendly acoustics and thermals", but the thing Dell seems proudest of is its shrinking of T350, which is 37 per cent smaller than its predecessor.

Continue readingNever mind Russia: Turkey and Vietnam are Microsoft's new state-backed hacker threats du jour It isn't just the big dogs preparing to bite, warns Redmond

Iran, Turkey and both North and South Korea are bases for nation-state cyber attacks, Microsoft has claimed – as well as old favourite Russia.

While more than half of cyberattacks spotted by Redmond came from Russia, of more interest to the wider world is information from the US megacorp's annual Digital Defence Report about lesser-known nation state cyber-attackers.

"After Russia, the largest volume of attacks we observed came from North Korea, Iran and China; South Korea, Turkey (a new entrant to our reporting) and Vietnam were also active but represent much less volume," said MS in a post announcing its findings.

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According to an interview with the BBC, founder and chief executive Luis von Ahn sees his company's approach to gamifying education as a way of getting children off distracting social media apps such as TikTok and Instagram.

"But the problem with smartphones is they are a double-edged sword – they also come with interruptive things, like TikTok,” he told the licence fee-funded broadcaster.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3uVecyt