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Marvell says it has samples of TSMC-made 5nm server DPUs – and 3nm is next
Thursday, 07 October 2021 10:10

HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:00:17 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/0cb7b00818c8d9839e09d76c488cdefa44e9c9ea/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/c6e3c53140449b5437e631f0aa65e2acda7f855d/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/c6e3c53140449b5437e631f0aa65e2acda7f855d/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:00:17 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 69a33111cae8fe91-MEL Marvell Octeon 10 DPUs sampling from TSMC's 5nm fabs • The Register

Octeon 10 packs Arm CPU cores, crypto and AI acceleration, and more


Marvell has produced samples of a server microprocessor with up to 24 Arm-compatible cores that could be used for applications involving artificial intelligence as well as network management, a spokesperson told The Register.

These chips are part of the Octeon family, and Marvell refers to them as data processing units. They are designed to run high-throughput code in cloud and data center environments, the company said.

"We are sampling Octeon silicon to our customers and they're working to bring their products to market next year," a spokeswoman said this week.

Data processing unit, aka DPU, is an irritating label because all computer processors are data-processing units. The industry has taken to use the term for specialized accelerators to which CPU cores can offload routine but intensive work, such as network packet processing, data encryption and compression, and AI inference and training. You might also know them as SmartNICs.

The goal here is to run these workloads on hardware designed to handle the tasks fast and efficiently, and free up host CPU cores to run general-purpose applications. DPUs tend to be many core devices that sit on network paths, and are connected to other processors and storage via buses or tighter integration.

Marvell said these latest Octeon 10 parts [product brief PDF] could be used to process data at, say, the edge of 5G wireless networks as well as perform packet filtering and some machine-learning tasks.

These components have, for one, competition from Nvidia's BlueField-3 data processing unit, which crams in up to 16 Arm Cortex-A78 CPU cores plus 16 programmable accelerator cores that have 256 execution threads total as well as PCIe and Ethernet connectivity. Nvidia on Tuesday announced it was including Lenovo in VMware's Project Monterey program, which is an effort to redesign servers with technologies including Bluefield DPUs.

Marvell said the Octeon 10 is three times faster and draws 50 per cent less power than its predecessor, the Octeon TX2. The hardware biz started making Octeon chips based on the MIPS architecture, and later added Arm cores to its lineup.

The chip has machine-learning and cryptography acceleration units as well as packet parsers, and supports DDR5 and PCIe 5.0 interconnects plus Ethernet up to 400G, depending on the SKU. The 2.5GHz CPU cores use Arm's Neoverse N2 design, which was introduced earlier this year.

Marvell on its website claimed the chip is the first 5nm server-class accelerator of its kind. The chips will be manufactured by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., otherwise known as TSMC, on its 5nm node.

Marvell also said it hopes to put out chips for data centers and 5G kit made using TSMC's 3nm node. These processors will have new technologies for faster connections between multiple dies in a package, we're told. TSMC plans to fabricate mobile and data-center parts in volume on 3nm in the latter-half of next year.

Marvell, which is mainly known for its networking gear, also unveiled the Prestera DX 7321 Ethernet switch, also made using a 5nm process.

The switch is designed to facilitate faster data transfers along the back-end of 5G infrastructure. It supports OpenRAN, an industry-wide open hardware and software effort to decouple and widen the 5G network infrastructure. ®


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A key standard set to double data transfer speeds between the main components of computers will be finalized in a matter of months.

The final specification for PCI-Express 6.0 is targeted for the end of this year or early 2022, Al Yanes, president and chairperson of the standards organization PCI-Special Interest Group, told The Register this week.

"The rule of thumb is that we typically see products utilizing the latest PCIe architecture 12 to 18 months after final specification release," Yanes added.

Continue readingEU readies 'antitrust charges' against Apple Pay for locking rivals out of iPhone NFC chip Monopoly is a board game, not a handbook

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The EU is set to file anti-competitive charges against Cupertino regarding its tap-to-pay system, Reuters reported, citing sources. Euro antitrust watchdogs are apparently not happy that the NFC chips in iPhones and iPads are restricted to the iGiant's Pay software, unfairly locking out alternative wireless payment apps.

The charges will be the result of a European Commission investigation that started last year into Apple's terms and conditions with merchants, the limited access to the NFC hardware, and more.

Continue readingOpen Sesame, says Google... to voice identification: Speech ID adds biometric security to call-centre bots Eleven. Eleh-ven. Ala-vuhn*. Oh never mind

Google has launched a speech identification system aimed at commercial call centres – leaving some biometric security questions unanswered at the same time.

According to the Chocolate Factory, Speaker ID is a way of identifying callers using just their voice, seemingly avoiding annoying and time-consuming ID check from the call centre agents. It even works, so Google says, without requiring a special text or password – voices can be identified from a sample of natural speech.

The omnipresent search and email giant has launched the product in conjunction with its existing Contact Center AI (CCAI), claiming the speech bot package has created a 20 to 35 per cent call deflection away from agents, between $1.3m and $3.7m productivity gains per centre in reduced average call times, and up to 75 per cent reduction in effort to manage contact centre solutions. All this according to a study commissioned by Google and conducted by Forrester Consulting in August 2020.

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Efforts to bring Linux to Apple Silicon have resulted in a basic functional desktop, according to the Asahi Linux team.

The project kicked off in earnest with a lengthy blog post earlier this year detailing the challenges involved in getting the OS onto Apple's latest and greatest.

Since then Apple M1 support has been sidling into the Linux kernel and by August the GNOME desktop was shown booting up with the experience described as "not great, but usable."

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The Apache Software Foundation has hurried out a patch to address a pair of HTTP Web Server vulnerabilities, at least one of which is already being actively exploited.

Apache's HTTP Server is widely used, and the vulnerabilities, CVE-2021-41524 and CVE-2021-41773, aren't great. The latter, a path traversal and file disclosure flaw, is particularly problematic.

The former was reported to Apache's security team on 17 September and can be exploited by an external source to DoS a server with a specially crafted request. It turned up in version 2.4.49, which was released on September 15, and the Apache crew is not aware of any exploit.

Continue readingRaspberry Pi looks to set up African retail channel to make buying a mini computer there as easy as Pi High shipping costs barrier to access for many of continent’s inhabitants

Raspberry Pi said yesterday it would be pushing to get its miniature computers into more shops across Africa, admitting that its presence on the continent was limited to a single approved reseller with commercial ops in a few countries in southern Africa.

Writing on the company blog, Ken Okolo said he had been recently appointed to focus on building a network of resellers and partnerships across industry and the education sector in Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Uganda.

Previously Raspberry Pi was available through a South African reseller with "some commercial operations" in nearby countries, but the rest of the continent was vastly underserved, relying on e-commerce sites like Amazon and their high shipping rates, to dispatch the product from other parts of the globe.

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Updated Links to torrents that contain 128GB of data seemingly pulled from the Amazon-owned Twitch streaming service have been posted to 4chan.

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Twitter user Sinoc229 posted a lengthy thread detailing the content of the files. Elliot Padfield of creator "incubator" Padfield Ventures, who's also had a browse through the documents, told The Register: "I believe the leak is legitimate... the codebase appears to be real."

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Cisco is warning customers that the base price of its hardware is scheduled to jump from the start of next month amid the "ongoing industry-wide global supply chain challenges" – and sources have told The Reg the rise will be 7 per cent.

This likely won't go down well with customers – nobody wants to pay more for routers and switches – but it's hardly a surprise: CEO Chuck Robbins said in May the firm was fighting for all the components it could buy as demand surged to a 10-year high, saying it was considering "strategic price increases."

A spokesperson at Cisco sent us a statement:

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The explanation was posted on the page about "ways to install Windows 11." It may be that Microsoft always intended this, but it also follows intense feedback from users frustrated or annoyed at not being able to upgrade to the latest Windows.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:00:17 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/0cb7b00818c8d9839e09d76c488cdefa44e9c9ea/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/c6e3c53140449b5437e631f0aa65e2acda7f855d/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/c6e3c53140449b5437e631f0aa65e2acda7f855d/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:00:17 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines x-content-type-options: nosniff cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 69a33111cae8fe91-MEL Marvell Octeon 10 DPUs sampling from TSMC's 5nm fabs • The Register

Octeon 10 packs Arm CPU cores, crypto and AI acceleration, and more


Marvell has produced samples of a server microprocessor with up to 24 Arm-compatible cores that could be used for applications involving artificial intelligence as well as network management, a spokesperson told The Register.

These chips are part of the Octeon family, and Marvell refers to them as data processing units. They are designed to run high-throughput code in cloud and data center environments, the company said.

"We are sampling Octeon silicon to our customers and they're working to bring their products to market next year," a spokeswoman said this week.

Data processing unit, aka DPU, is an irritating label because all computer processors are data-processing units. The industry has taken to use the term for specialized accelerators to which CPU cores can offload routine but intensive work, such as network packet processing, data encryption and compression, and AI inference and training. You might also know them as SmartNICs.

The goal here is to run these workloads on hardware designed to handle the tasks fast and efficiently, and free up host CPU cores to run general-purpose applications. DPUs tend to be many core devices that sit on network paths, and are connected to other processors and storage via buses or tighter integration.

Marvell said these latest Octeon 10 parts [product brief PDF] could be used to process data at, say, the edge of 5G wireless networks as well as perform packet filtering and some machine-learning tasks.

These components have, for one, competition from Nvidia's BlueField-3 data processing unit, which crams in up to 16 Arm Cortex-A78 CPU cores plus 16 programmable accelerator cores that have 256 execution threads total as well as PCIe and Ethernet connectivity. Nvidia on Tuesday announced it was including Lenovo in VMware's Project Monterey program, which is an effort to redesign servers with technologies including Bluefield DPUs.

Marvell said the Octeon 10 is three times faster and draws 50 per cent less power than its predecessor, the Octeon TX2. The hardware biz started making Octeon chips based on the MIPS architecture, and later added Arm cores to its lineup.

The chip has machine-learning and cryptography acceleration units as well as packet parsers, and supports DDR5 and PCIe 5.0 interconnects plus Ethernet up to 400G, depending on the SKU. The 2.5GHz CPU cores use Arm's Neoverse N2 design, which was introduced earlier this year.

Marvell on its website claimed the chip is the first 5nm server-class accelerator of its kind. The chips will be manufactured by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., otherwise known as TSMC, on its 5nm node.

Marvell also said it hopes to put out chips for data centers and 5G kit made using TSMC's 3nm node. These processors will have new technologies for faster connections between multiple dies in a package, we're told. TSMC plans to fabricate mobile and data-center parts in volume on 3nm in the latter-half of next year.

Marvell, which is mainly known for its networking gear, also unveiled the Prestera DX 7321 Ethernet switch, also made using a 5nm process.

The switch is designed to facilitate faster data transfers along the back-end of 5G infrastructure. It supports OpenRAN, an industry-wide open hardware and software effort to decouple and widen the 5G network infrastructure. ®


Other stories you might like

A key standard set to double data transfer speeds between the main components of computers will be finalized in a matter of months.

The final specification for PCI-Express 6.0 is targeted for the end of this year or early 2022, Al Yanes, president and chairperson of the standards organization PCI-Special Interest Group, told The Register this week.

"The rule of thumb is that we typically see products utilizing the latest PCIe architecture 12 to 18 months after final specification release," Yanes added.

Continue readingEU readies 'antitrust charges' against Apple Pay for locking rivals out of iPhone NFC chip Monopoly is a board game, not a handbook

Apple's decision to only allow Apple Pay to access the NFC chip in iPhones could result in the Silicon Valley giant paying hefty anti-monopoly fines in Europe.

The EU is set to file anti-competitive charges against Cupertino regarding its tap-to-pay system, Reuters reported, citing sources. Euro antitrust watchdogs are apparently not happy that the NFC chips in iPhones and iPads are restricted to the iGiant's Pay software, unfairly locking out alternative wireless payment apps.

The charges will be the result of a European Commission investigation that started last year into Apple's terms and conditions with merchants, the limited access to the NFC hardware, and more.

Continue readingOpen Sesame, says Google... to voice identification: Speech ID adds biometric security to call-centre bots Eleven. Eleh-ven. Ala-vuhn*. Oh never mind

Google has launched a speech identification system aimed at commercial call centres – leaving some biometric security questions unanswered at the same time.

According to the Chocolate Factory, Speaker ID is a way of identifying callers using just their voice, seemingly avoiding annoying and time-consuming ID check from the call centre agents. It even works, so Google says, without requiring a special text or password – voices can be identified from a sample of natural speech.

The omnipresent search and email giant has launched the product in conjunction with its existing Contact Center AI (CCAI), claiming the speech bot package has created a 20 to 35 per cent call deflection away from agents, between $1.3m and $3.7m productivity gains per centre in reduced average call times, and up to 75 per cent reduction in effort to manage contact centre solutions. All this according to a study commissioned by Google and conducted by Forrester Consulting in August 2020.

Continue readingProgress report: Asahi Linux brings forth a usable basic desktop on Apple's M1 Drivers slip into the kernel as team ponders GPU hardware

Efforts to bring Linux to Apple Silicon have resulted in a basic functional desktop, according to the Asahi Linux team.

The project kicked off in earnest with a lengthy blog post earlier this year detailing the challenges involved in getting the OS onto Apple's latest and greatest.

Since then Apple M1 support has been sidling into the Linux kernel and by August the GNOME desktop was shown booting up with the experience described as "not great, but usable."

Continue readingRunning a recent Apache web server version? You probably need to patch it. Now Unless you want to leak like a sieve

The Apache Software Foundation has hurried out a patch to address a pair of HTTP Web Server vulnerabilities, at least one of which is already being actively exploited.

Apache's HTTP Server is widely used, and the vulnerabilities, CVE-2021-41524 and CVE-2021-41773, aren't great. The latter, a path traversal and file disclosure flaw, is particularly problematic.

The former was reported to Apache's security team on 17 September and can be exploited by an external source to DoS a server with a specially crafted request. It turned up in version 2.4.49, which was released on September 15, and the Apache crew is not aware of any exploit.

Continue readingRaspberry Pi looks to set up African retail channel to make buying a mini computer there as easy as Pi High shipping costs barrier to access for many of continent’s inhabitants

Raspberry Pi said yesterday it would be pushing to get its miniature computers into more shops across Africa, admitting that its presence on the continent was limited to a single approved reseller with commercial ops in a few countries in southern Africa.

Writing on the company blog, Ken Okolo said he had been recently appointed to focus on building a network of resellers and partnerships across industry and the education sector in Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Uganda.

Previously Raspberry Pi was available through a South African reseller with "some commercial operations" in nearby countries, but the rest of the continent was vastly underserved, relying on e-commerce sites like Amazon and their high shipping rates, to dispatch the product from other parts of the globe.

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Updated Links to torrents that contain 128GB of data seemingly pulled from the Amazon-owned Twitch streaming service have been posted to 4chan.

Without a trace of irony, the anonymous poster described Twitch as "a disgusting toxic cesspool," and linked to the data, which they alleged contains the source code for the Twitch site, references to a Valve Steam marketplace competitor called Vapour, other bits of released and unreleased software, and data on payouts made to Twitch creators.

Twitter user Sinoc229 posted a lengthy thread detailing the content of the files. Elliot Padfield of creator "incubator" Padfield Ventures, who's also had a browse through the documents, told The Register: "I believe the leak is legitimate... the codebase appears to be real."

Continue readingSupply chain pain: Cisco's base price structure moving north from November Demand for components at a 10-year high

Cisco is warning customers that the base price of its hardware is scheduled to jump from the start of next month amid the "ongoing industry-wide global supply chain challenges" – and sources have told The Reg the rise will be 7 per cent.

This likely won't go down well with customers – nobody wants to pay more for routers and switches – but it's hardly a surprise: CEO Chuck Robbins said in May the firm was fighting for all the components it could buy as demand surged to a 10-year high, saying it was considering "strategic price increases."

A spokesperson at Cisco sent us a statement:

Continue readingWant to check out Windows 11 but don't want to buy a new PC? Here's how to bypass the hardware requirements Microsoft does not recommend this

Microsoft has softened its stance on hardware requirements for Windows 11 by documenting a way to bypass them – though it warns against doing so and states that it is unsupported and will not be entitled to updates.

The explanation was posted on the page about "ways to install Windows 11." It may be that Microsoft always intended this, but it also follows intense feedback from users frustrated or annoyed at not being able to upgrade to the latest Windows.

When Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella posted on LinkedIn about the "start of a new generation of Windows," comments included "My 2015 iPad is capable of running the latest iOS. Meanwhile, Microsoft has chosen to obsolete hardware that's only 2-3 years old. Ludicrous," and "This entails a significant effort in production which also comes at the worst time due to supply chain shortages."

Continue readingCelonis and Software AG target IoT and streaming process mining as firms grapple with data overload Newcomer specialist and elderly data integration generalist make their pitches

Two software vendors with very different backgrounds are launching technology aimed at understanding operational processes based on IoT and streaming data this week.

Hotly tipped data mining specialist Celonis, which raised $1bn in a funding round earlier this year, has bought data streaming outfit Lense.io and launched technology for mapping and comparing business processes with a graph database. Meanwhile, Software AG, a data integration firm dating back to the late 1960s, has launched new tech aimed at understanding operational processes through IoT data.

One analyst speaking to The Register said that while the overlapping announcements showed vendors' interest in process mining, most companies were a long way from making use of IoT data across functional silos.

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The update follows bridges for the likes of Teams, Slack and – recently – WhatsApp. The timing is interesting considering the recent woes of the Facebook tentacle.

Amandine Le Pape, co-founder of Element, had already given WhatsApp a jab with the privacy blade the last time we spoke and Element's CEO, Matthew Hodgson, joined the party during our chat about the Signal bridge.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3uOcVZP