Polls

Is there an unsecured wireless network near you?
 
China passes half a billion 5G subscriptions and adds at least 190k new 5G base stations in six months
Friday, 20 August 2021 16:28

HTTP/2 200 date: Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:00:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/cfcb1dc3691f61d249cfee9740b601efd2818da7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:00:10 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 682462d6cfed5593-SYD China passes half a billion 5G subscriptions and adds at least 190k new 5G base stations in six months • The Register

Carriers are sharing kit to preserve cash – now for the private 5G boom


China had over half a billion 5G subscribers and over a million 5G base stations as of June 30, but the nation's big three mobile carriers have warned of a slowdown.

The Register's numbers come from repeating our exercise from March 2021, when we pored over annual reports from China Telecom, China Unicom, and China Mobile, to find a total of 322 million 5G subscribers and 1,150,000 operating base stations.

As of yesterday, the three mega-carriers have all announced their results for the first half of the year, so we've repeated the exercise. Here are the results:

25186501,000111,000946
12142.2460,00080,000310
13144.5460,00080,000362
503172.71,421,000*271,0001,618

All three carriers also reported improvements in average revenue per user, revenue growth of nine per cent or more, and big profits. All reported billions of yuan spent on infrastructure.

Impressive, right?

Maybe not so much. For starters, China Unicom and China Telecom have accelerated their infrastructure-sharing arrangements, hence our asterisk on the total of operational base stations in the table above – the carriers are probably managing that many units, but there are fewer physical units in place.

The two have also started sharing their 4G infrastructure.

China Mobile is also collaborating on network builds. It teamed with China Broadcasting Network Corporation to share a network operating in the 700MHz band.

China Unicom reported decreased capital expenditure as a result, as did China Telecom. Supply chain issues were one reason for the dip, but the sheer scale of the existing 5G rollout and collaboration were also factors.

All three carriers were bullish about winning many more 5G subscribers, especially by targeting corporate customers.

China Mobile, for example, signed 900 contracts for provincial-level 5G projects and 452 deals for dedicated 5G networks. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

A committee at the University of Texas in Austin has advised against using AI software to oversee students' online tests, citing the psychological toll on students and the financial toll on academic institutions.

Acknowledging that some form of online proctoring is necessary to discourage academic misconduct, the committee concluded, "we strongly recommend against the use of AI-based software like Proctorio and ProctorU."

The Report of the Academic Integrity Committee about Online Testing and Assessment,spotted by Megan Menchaca, education reporter for the Austin-American Statesman, is said to have been included in a university official's recent message to faculty.

Continue readingApple extends live-at-work to at least January 2022 Stores of iThings will stay open, though

Apple has again pushed back the date for its staff to return to their offices, this time from October until at least January 2022, as the COVID-19 coronavirus continues to spread in America and beyond.

The news was broken to iEmployees in an internal email circulated by HR and retail supremo Deirdre O’Brien, Bloomberg first reported.

O’Brien urged workers to get vaccinated – there is no mandatory requirement – and said Apple would confirm the exact date they could go back to working at their desks one month before offices reopened. Staff are expected to work in the office at least three days a week when they return. Apple's retail stores will remain open.

Continue readingEpic lawsuit's latest claims: Google slipped tons of cash to game devs, Android makers to cement Play store dominance Read the allegations web giant tried to keep secret from the public

Epic Games' objections to Google's business practices became clearer on Thursday with the release of previously redacted accusations in the gaming giant's lawsuit against the internet goliath.

Those accusations included details of a Google-run operation dubbed Project Hug that aimed to sling hundreds of millions of dollars at developers to get them to remain within Google Play; and a so-called Premiere Device Program that gave device makers extra cash if they ensured users could only get their apps from the Play store, locking out third-party marketplaces and incentivizing manufacturers not to create their own software souks.

A year ago, Epic filed a complaint against Google, following a similar complaint against Apple, alleging that the Android overlord violated antitrust law by removing its Fortnite game from the Google Play store.

Continue readingMicrosoft slaps on some new Paint and previews Windows 11 on Azure Look away from those price rises and look at our new toys!

Microsoft attempted to derail the bad news train last night by releasing another Windows 11 update – replete with ISOs – and unveiling a preview of the wunder-OS on Azure Virtual Desktop.

The updates came as Microsoft, which recently celebrated another bumper set of results for fiscal 2020, warned Microsoft 365 customers that price rises were on the way.

Still, at least those Insiders testing Windows 11 have a new Clock app to play with. So that's alright then.

Continue readingMore Boots on Moon delays: NASA stops work on SpaceX human landing system as Blue Origin lawsuit rolls on US agency agrees to pause in exchange for 'expedited' schedule. That'll be a first for Artemis

NASA is calling a halt to work on its Human Landing System for more than two months while the legal shenanigans triggered by Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin run their course.

Blue Origin filed its latest lawsuit last week over a multibillion-dollar contract awarded to SpaceX for the development of the next lunar lander.

The suit had followed a formal protest by Bezos and pals, which was subsequently snubbed by lawmakers.

Continue readingUK's competition regulator fires red flare over Nvidia's $40bn Arm takeover deal We knew this was coming but from Britain? Odd

Britain's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has thrown a spanner into Nvidia's buyout of Arm, saying the deal presented "significant competition concerns" in a report published today.

The CMA's July report highlighted the danger of Nvidia "foreclosing" Arm's intellectual property and lessening competition for industry-critical data centre CPUs and GPUs, as well as automotive system-on-chip products.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden triggered the CMA review in April after issuing a Public Interest Intervention Notice against the US chipmaker's $40bn takeover of Cambridge-headquartered Arm, which is owned by Japan's Softbank.

Continue readingCloud load balancer snafu leads to 3D printer user printing on a stranger's kit Founder of The Spaghetti Detective apologises for config blunder

A 3D printer remote monitoring company accidentally exposed users' printers to each other after a cloud reconfiguration snafu.

Just over 70 of The Spaghetti Detective's users were able to control others' devices as a result – something the service said it doesn't normally allow to happen.

"I made a stupid mistake last night," wrote the founder of the platform, Kenneth Jiang, in an analysis of what went wrong.

Continue readingUK's Defra dangles £10m as it fishes for help with upgrading Data Services Platform Suppliers need to support bathing water widgets, among other things

The UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) wants to get to know some tech suppliers able to support its ambition to upgrade its data services platform in a deal which could be worth £10m.

The current platform is used to support a wide range of Defra and third-party applications, from hydrology to fish data. But the department is looking to move to the third generation of the Data Services Platform and has set out to on an "market engagement process" to talk to suppliers who might be able to help out.

According to the prior information notice, the Whitehall department, which spends around £2.6bn a year, is on the hunt for suppliers to help with data integration services, domain registry services, linked data, linked data APIs, metadata catalogue, and so on.

Continue readingJapan's aerospace agency hooks up with Boeing to make planes quieter when they land Hope to address the noise of airflows over flaps and other parts as that can be louder than engines

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has teamed with Boeing on a joint research project to make quieter mid-sized passenger planes – by figuring out how to cut the noise generated by their airframes.

Aircraft noise is an issue around the world, and the aviation industry is keenly aware that its social licence depends on operating as quietly as possible – especially at urban airports that travellers prefer because they're closer to big city centres.

One such airport is Tokyo's Haneda, which in 2020 opened new routes. Although the numbers of flights arriving were suppressed by unexpected subsequent travel bans, pre-COVID the new routes would have increased Haneda's annual international arrivals and departures from 60,000 to 99,000. The result would be many aircraft flying at low altitudes over Tokyo, as seen in the following tweet.

Continue readingLive, die, copy-paste, repeat: Everything is recycled now, including ideas We can't rewind, we've gone too far

Something for the Weekend, Sir? My house has gone missing. Where it used to be, there is just an absence, a nothing. I guess you could call it a gap in the housing market.

Like yourself, I was intrigued after reading aboutFourKingsMap last week to see what four rude words might describe the location of my old front doorstep back in Blighty*. Unfortunately, my previous abode is no longer where it was. Maybe it took things too literally when I told everybody I was going to "move house" and it tried running down the street after the removal van.

I called the present owners of the property to find out where the house might have gone. Had they misplaced it?

Continue readingUK's Surveillance Camera Commissioner grills Hikvision on China human rights abuses Eye-catching letter exchange revealed

The China-based surveillance equipment manufacturer accused of being linked to the human rights abuse of the Uyghur ethnic minority in Xinjiang has denied any wrongdoing in a heated exchange with the UK's Surveillance Camera Commissioner.

Eye-catchingly, Hikvision's denials came in a series of letters published by Surveillance Camera Commissioner Professor Fraser Sampson on the GOV.UK website.

The illuminating exchange between Sampson and the Chinese company's UK arm began after Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee called for Hikvision to be banned from operating in Britain after linking the firm to what the US has called genocide.

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:00:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/cfcb1dc3691f61d249cfee9740b601efd2818da7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:00:10 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 682462d6cfed5593-SYD China passes half a billion 5G subscriptions and adds at least 190k new 5G base stations in six months • The Register

Carriers are sharing kit to preserve cash – now for the private 5G boom


China had over half a billion 5G subscribers and over a million 5G base stations as of June 30, but the nation's big three mobile carriers have warned of a slowdown.

The Register's numbers come from repeating our exercise from March 2021, when we pored over annual reports from China Telecom, China Unicom, and China Mobile, to find a total of 322 million 5G subscribers and 1,150,000 operating base stations.

As of yesterday, the three mega-carriers have all announced their results for the first half of the year, so we've repeated the exercise. Here are the results:

25186501,000111,000946
12142.2460,00080,000310
13144.5460,00080,000362
503172.71,421,000*271,0001,618

All three carriers also reported improvements in average revenue per user, revenue growth of nine per cent or more, and big profits. All reported billions of yuan spent on infrastructure.

Impressive, right?

Maybe not so much. For starters, China Unicom and China Telecom have accelerated their infrastructure-sharing arrangements, hence our asterisk on the total of operational base stations in the table above – the carriers are probably managing that many units, but there are fewer physical units in place.

The two have also started sharing their 4G infrastructure.

China Mobile is also collaborating on network builds. It teamed with China Broadcasting Network Corporation to share a network operating in the 700MHz band.

China Unicom reported decreased capital expenditure as a result, as did China Telecom. Supply chain issues were one reason for the dip, but the sheer scale of the existing 5G rollout and collaboration were also factors.

All three carriers were bullish about winning many more 5G subscribers, especially by targeting corporate customers.

China Mobile, for example, signed 900 contracts for provincial-level 5G projects and 452 deals for dedicated 5G networks. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

A committee at the University of Texas in Austin has advised against using AI software to oversee students' online tests, citing the psychological toll on students and the financial toll on academic institutions.

Acknowledging that some form of online proctoring is necessary to discourage academic misconduct, the committee concluded, "we strongly recommend against the use of AI-based software like Proctorio and ProctorU."

The Report of the Academic Integrity Committee about Online Testing and Assessment,spotted by Megan Menchaca, education reporter for the Austin-American Statesman, is said to have been included in a university official's recent message to faculty.

Continue readingApple extends live-at-work to at least January 2022 Stores of iThings will stay open, though

Apple has again pushed back the date for its staff to return to their offices, this time from October until at least January 2022, as the COVID-19 coronavirus continues to spread in America and beyond.

The news was broken to iEmployees in an internal email circulated by HR and retail supremo Deirdre O’Brien, Bloomberg first reported.

O’Brien urged workers to get vaccinated – there is no mandatory requirement – and said Apple would confirm the exact date they could go back to working at their desks one month before offices reopened. Staff are expected to work in the office at least three days a week when they return. Apple's retail stores will remain open.

Continue readingEpic lawsuit's latest claims: Google slipped tons of cash to game devs, Android makers to cement Play store dominance Read the allegations web giant tried to keep secret from the public

Epic Games' objections to Google's business practices became clearer on Thursday with the release of previously redacted accusations in the gaming giant's lawsuit against the internet goliath.

Those accusations included details of a Google-run operation dubbed Project Hug that aimed to sling hundreds of millions of dollars at developers to get them to remain within Google Play; and a so-called Premiere Device Program that gave device makers extra cash if they ensured users could only get their apps from the Play store, locking out third-party marketplaces and incentivizing manufacturers not to create their own software souks.

A year ago, Epic filed a complaint against Google, following a similar complaint against Apple, alleging that the Android overlord violated antitrust law by removing its Fortnite game from the Google Play store.

Continue readingMicrosoft slaps on some new Paint and previews Windows 11 on Azure Look away from those price rises and look at our new toys!

Microsoft attempted to derail the bad news train last night by releasing another Windows 11 update – replete with ISOs – and unveiling a preview of the wunder-OS on Azure Virtual Desktop.

The updates came as Microsoft, which recently celebrated another bumper set of results for fiscal 2020, warned Microsoft 365 customers that price rises were on the way.

Still, at least those Insiders testing Windows 11 have a new Clock app to play with. So that's alright then.

Continue readingMore Boots on Moon delays: NASA stops work on SpaceX human landing system as Blue Origin lawsuit rolls on US agency agrees to pause in exchange for 'expedited' schedule. That'll be a first for Artemis

NASA is calling a halt to work on its Human Landing System for more than two months while the legal shenanigans triggered by Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin run their course.

Blue Origin filed its latest lawsuit last week over a multibillion-dollar contract awarded to SpaceX for the development of the next lunar lander.

The suit had followed a formal protest by Bezos and pals, which was subsequently snubbed by lawmakers.

Continue readingUK's competition regulator fires red flare over Nvidia's $40bn Arm takeover deal We knew this was coming but from Britain? Odd

Britain's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has thrown a spanner into Nvidia's buyout of Arm, saying the deal presented "significant competition concerns" in a report published today.

The CMA's July report highlighted the danger of Nvidia "foreclosing" Arm's intellectual property and lessening competition for industry-critical data centre CPUs and GPUs, as well as automotive system-on-chip products.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden triggered the CMA review in April after issuing a Public Interest Intervention Notice against the US chipmaker's $40bn takeover of Cambridge-headquartered Arm, which is owned by Japan's Softbank.

Continue readingCloud load balancer snafu leads to 3D printer user printing on a stranger's kit Founder of The Spaghetti Detective apologises for config blunder

A 3D printer remote monitoring company accidentally exposed users' printers to each other after a cloud reconfiguration snafu.

Just over 70 of The Spaghetti Detective's users were able to control others' devices as a result – something the service said it doesn't normally allow to happen.

"I made a stupid mistake last night," wrote the founder of the platform, Kenneth Jiang, in an analysis of what went wrong.

Continue readingUK's Defra dangles £10m as it fishes for help with upgrading Data Services Platform Suppliers need to support bathing water widgets, among other things

The UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) wants to get to know some tech suppliers able to support its ambition to upgrade its data services platform in a deal which could be worth £10m.

The current platform is used to support a wide range of Defra and third-party applications, from hydrology to fish data. But the department is looking to move to the third generation of the Data Services Platform and has set out to on an "market engagement process" to talk to suppliers who might be able to help out.

According to the prior information notice, the Whitehall department, which spends around £2.6bn a year, is on the hunt for suppliers to help with data integration services, domain registry services, linked data, linked data APIs, metadata catalogue, and so on.

Continue readingJapan's aerospace agency hooks up with Boeing to make planes quieter when they land Hope to address the noise of airflows over flaps and other parts as that can be louder than engines

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has teamed with Boeing on a joint research project to make quieter mid-sized passenger planes – by figuring out how to cut the noise generated by their airframes.

Aircraft noise is an issue around the world, and the aviation industry is keenly aware that its social licence depends on operating as quietly as possible – especially at urban airports that travellers prefer because they're closer to big city centres.

One such airport is Tokyo's Haneda, which in 2020 opened new routes. Although the numbers of flights arriving were suppressed by unexpected subsequent travel bans, pre-COVID the new routes would have increased Haneda's annual international arrivals and departures from 60,000 to 99,000. The result would be many aircraft flying at low altitudes over Tokyo, as seen in the following tweet.

Continue readingLive, die, copy-paste, repeat: Everything is recycled now, including ideas We can't rewind, we've gone too far

Something for the Weekend, Sir? My house has gone missing. Where it used to be, there is just an absence, a nothing. I guess you could call it a gap in the housing market.

Like yourself, I was intrigued after reading aboutFourKingsMap last week to see what four rude words might describe the location of my old front doorstep back in Blighty*. Unfortunately, my previous abode is no longer where it was. Maybe it took things too literally when I told everybody I was going to "move house" and it tried running down the street after the removal van.

I called the present owners of the property to find out where the house might have gone. Had they misplaced it?

Continue readingUK's Surveillance Camera Commissioner grills Hikvision on China human rights abuses Eye-catching letter exchange revealed

The China-based surveillance equipment manufacturer accused of being linked to the human rights abuse of the Uyghur ethnic minority in Xinjiang has denied any wrongdoing in a heated exchange with the UK's Surveillance Camera Commissioner.

Eye-catchingly, Hikvision's denials came in a series of letters published by Surveillance Camera Commissioner Professor Fraser Sampson on the GOV.UK website.

The illuminating exchange between Sampson and the Chinese company's UK arm began after Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee called for Hikvision to be banned from operating in Britain after linking the firm to what the US has called genocide.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3gnF5ox