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Ever wondered how much data web giants generate? Singaporean super-app Grab says 40TB a day
Tuesday, 03 August 2021 15:31

HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 05 Aug 2021 02:03:21 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/9f6cf541a73dc15369b10bece4518c074ec5f929/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 05 Aug 2021 02:03:21 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 679c72d1ca6d16cd-SYD Ever wondered how much data web giants generate? Singaporean super-app Grab says 40TB a day • The Register

Reports record Q1 sales and advances plans for SPAC-ulative IPO


Singapore-based mega-app Grab has revealed that it generates 40TB of data a day. All that data is clearly valuable: Grab has also announced record profits.

The Southeast Asian company, which bought out Uber in Singapore and since expanded into e-commerce, payments, and financial services, did not disclose what it does with the data, nor how it is protected. But it did disclose [PDF] that it has 23.8 million monthly transacting customers, who collectively generated a record US$507 million adjusted net sales in its first quarter, boasting that the company saw a 39 per cent increase in adjusted net sales despite a COVID-related hit to its mobility services.

The company told The Register that not all of that 40TB of daily data is generated by customers - millions of drivers and other partners also contribute. Doing the math on the user/data ratio is still interesting.

Grab also claimed that in Q1 2021 it was Southeast Asia's most downloaded app, with its mobility and delivery services drawing the highest share of average monthly active smartphone users in the region across iOS and Android combined.

Not only are more people downloading the app in Southeast Asia, they are spending more. According to Grab, its spend per user increased by 31 per cent year-on-year.

The multinational company also said in 2020 it was overall responsible for 50 per cent of Southeast Asia's online food delivery, 72 per cent of the region's ride-hailing services and 23 per cent of its e-wallet market. The online food delivery segment seems to be the one to watch, as it experienced 96 per cent year-on-year growth from Q1 2020 to Q1 2021.

In an investor's call, Grab president Ming Maa said: "In Q1 2021, in spite of [COVID] re-emergence in various countries at different times, the diversification of our platform from both a geographic and segment perspective resulted in fairly stable GMV performance over the quarter.

"Now we did witness weaker mobility volumes in Q1, but this was offset by a strong uptick in deliveries with Grabmart proving to be one of the bright spots in the delivery segment."

Maa attributed the shift from mobility to delivery to lockdown measures across Southeast Asia. As for the future, he predicted:

Another expectation for Grab in the second half of 2021 is its plans to go public in the United States through a US$40 billion merger with Altimeter Growth, a Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC).

On Monday, Grab and Altimeter Growth filed a US Securities and Exchange Commission draft registration statement on Form F-4 in preparation for the IPO. ®


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This was the 30th period of quarter-on-quarter growth and the highest level of growth in five years, Vlad Shmunis, CEO, chairman and founder of RingCentral, he told analysts on an earnings call.

Continue readingSystems engineer community laments demise of much-loved LISA conference USENIX will continue to create similar content for SREcon

USENIX, the not-for-profit advanced computing association, has decided to put an end to its beloved LISA sysadmin conferences, at least as a standalone event.

In an online announcement, the LISA steering committee said that after 35 years of producing the "best systems engineering content" the event "will no longer be scheduled as a standalone conference."

"Established in 1987, USENIX LISA (originally Large Installation System Administration) was one of the industry's longest-running annual gatherings, and shared content for system administrators, network engineers, security engineers, programmers, researchers, and more. At its largest, LISA ran for six days and attracted more than 1,000 attendees and nearly 100 speakers," the note said.

Continue readingSolarWinds urges US judge to toss out crap infosec sueball: We got pwned by actual Russia, give us a break Company says it didn't skimp on security before everything went wrong

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Insisting that it was "the victim of the most sophisticated cyberattack in history" in a court filing, SolarWinds described a lawsuit from some of its smaller shareholders as an attempt to "convert this sophisticated cyber-crime" into an unrelated securities fraud court case.

"The Court should dismiss the Complaint because it fails to satisfy the heightened standards for pleading a Section 10(b) claim imposed by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act," it said [PDF].

Continue readingMicrosoft suspends free trials for Windows 365 after a day due to 'significant demand' Potential customers or freeloaders to blame? Also: Everything coming up Dutch for one UK user

A free two-month trial for Windows 365, a virtual PC running Windows 10 on Microsoft's Azure cloud, has been withdrawn after only a day having "reached capacity."

A note on the Windows 365 product page states: "Following significant demand, we have reached capacity for Windows 365 trials," and offers a signup to be notified when trials resume.

There is still capacity for actual customers, though, with Windows 365 available as specifications from $20 per user/month for 1 vCPU, 2GB RAM and 64GB storage, to $158.00 per user/month for 8 vCPU, 32GB RAM and 512GB storage. These are the prices with "Hybrid benefit," which means users with an existing Windows 10 Pro licence, in effect get a $4.00 discount.

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Kees Cook, a Google software engineer who has devoted much of his time to security features in the Linux kernel, has posted about continuing problems in the kernel which he said have insufficient focus.

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As we reported at the time, a search for stolen Nazi art at the elderly man's home actually turned up multiple items of military hardware in his underground garage.

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Not only was Cardix owner DSG Retail Ltd almost completely successful in its application to strike out Darren Warren's case against it, the one count Dixons didn't succeed on saw the case relegated to the county court because of its low value.

Warren wanted to sue the retailer over a digital break-in that saw nearly 6,000 point-of-sale terminals infected with malware. DSG discovered the data-slurping malware almost a year after it was planted, prompting a £500,000 fine from the Information Commissioner's Office.

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Responding to the results of a joint survey between ASUG and German-speaking user group DSAG, which showed some scepticism towards SAP's lift-and-shift package, Geoff Scott said users would have to look again at how they had customised their SAP ERP systems to fit their business processes.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 05 Aug 2021 02:03:21 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/9f6cf541a73dc15369b10bece4518c074ec5f929/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/82a7662fa59348b11e792d1684679c0a86db35e7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 05 Aug 2021 02:03:21 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 679c72d1ca6d16cd-SYD Ever wondered how much data web giants generate? Singaporean super-app Grab says 40TB a day • The Register

Reports record Q1 sales and advances plans for SPAC-ulative IPO


Singapore-based mega-app Grab has revealed that it generates 40TB of data a day. All that data is clearly valuable: Grab has also announced record profits.

The Southeast Asian company, which bought out Uber in Singapore and since expanded into e-commerce, payments, and financial services, did not disclose what it does with the data, nor how it is protected. But it did disclose [PDF] that it has 23.8 million monthly transacting customers, who collectively generated a record US$507 million adjusted net sales in its first quarter, boasting that the company saw a 39 per cent increase in adjusted net sales despite a COVID-related hit to its mobility services.

The company told The Register that not all of that 40TB of daily data is generated by customers - millions of drivers and other partners also contribute. Doing the math on the user/data ratio is still interesting.

Grab also claimed that in Q1 2021 it was Southeast Asia's most downloaded app, with its mobility and delivery services drawing the highest share of average monthly active smartphone users in the region across iOS and Android combined.

Not only are more people downloading the app in Southeast Asia, they are spending more. According to Grab, its spend per user increased by 31 per cent year-on-year.

The multinational company also said in 2020 it was overall responsible for 50 per cent of Southeast Asia's online food delivery, 72 per cent of the region's ride-hailing services and 23 per cent of its e-wallet market. The online food delivery segment seems to be the one to watch, as it experienced 96 per cent year-on-year growth from Q1 2020 to Q1 2021.

In an investor's call, Grab president Ming Maa said: "In Q1 2021, in spite of [COVID] re-emergence in various countries at different times, the diversification of our platform from both a geographic and segment perspective resulted in fairly stable GMV performance over the quarter.

"Now we did witness weaker mobility volumes in Q1, but this was offset by a strong uptick in deliveries with Grabmart proving to be one of the bright spots in the delivery segment."

Maa attributed the shift from mobility to delivery to lockdown measures across Southeast Asia. As for the future, he predicted:

Another expectation for Grab in the second half of 2021 is its plans to go public in the United States through a US$40 billion merger with Altimeter Growth, a Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC).

On Monday, Grab and Altimeter Growth filed a US Securities and Exchange Commission draft registration statement on Form F-4 in preparation for the IPO. ®


Other stories you might like

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After pro-union employees, represented by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), working at the BHM1 fulfillment center in Bessemer in the Cotton State lost their unionization election in April, the union swiftly filed objections to the labor relations board.

"A free and fair election was impossible," said [PDF] Kerstin Meyers, an NLRB hearing officer, this week. "Under the circumstances, I recommend that a second election be ordered."

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The targeted ad biz said it did so in the name of privacy, a source of persistent scandal for the corporation. Facebook said it disabled the accounts, apps, Pages, and platform access for NYU’s Ad Observatory Project and participating researchers because their work violated its rules.

"NYU’s Ad Observatory project studied political ads using unauthorized means to access and collect data from Facebook, in violation of our Terms of Service," said Mike Clark, product management director at Facebook, in a blog post.

Continue readingRingCentral shouts revenue growth from the rooftops while shareholders can't help but notice deepening losses Isn't that work-at-home-workforce eyeing a return to the office?

RingCentral is all about the integration of apps in the comms and collaboration sectors to boost productivity and efficiency, but the biz might just need someone to run the same rules over its own bloated overheads.

The cloudy comms concern reported second quarter numbers that show continued demand for its services: revenues leaped 36 per cent year-on-year to $379m, of which $351m was subscriptions.

This was the 30th period of quarter-on-quarter growth and the highest level of growth in five years, Vlad Shmunis, CEO, chairman and founder of RingCentral, he told analysts on an earnings call.

Continue readingSystems engineer community laments demise of much-loved LISA conference USENIX will continue to create similar content for SREcon

USENIX, the not-for-profit advanced computing association, has decided to put an end to its beloved LISA sysadmin conferences, at least as a standalone event.

In an online announcement, the LISA steering committee said that after 35 years of producing the "best systems engineering content" the event "will no longer be scheduled as a standalone conference."

"Established in 1987, USENIX LISA (originally Large Installation System Administration) was one of the industry's longest-running annual gatherings, and shared content for system administrators, network engineers, security engineers, programmers, researchers, and more. At its largest, LISA ran for six days and attracted more than 1,000 attendees and nearly 100 speakers," the note said.

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Insisting that it was "the victim of the most sophisticated cyberattack in history" in a court filing, SolarWinds described a lawsuit from some of its smaller shareholders as an attempt to "convert this sophisticated cyber-crime" into an unrelated securities fraud court case.

"The Court should dismiss the Complaint because it fails to satisfy the heightened standards for pleading a Section 10(b) claim imposed by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act," it said [PDF].

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A free two-month trial for Windows 365, a virtual PC running Windows 10 on Microsoft's Azure cloud, has been withdrawn after only a day having "reached capacity."

A note on the Windows 365 product page states: "Following significant demand, we have reached capacity for Windows 365 trials," and offers a signup to be notified when trials resume.

There is still capacity for actual customers, though, with Windows 365 available as specifications from $20 per user/month for 1 vCPU, 2GB RAM and 64GB storage, to $158.00 per user/month for 8 vCPU, 32GB RAM and 512GB storage. These are the prices with "Hybrid benefit," which means users with an existing Windows 10 Pro licence, in effect get a $4.00 discount.

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According to a contract award notice published this week, MMGRP Limited was handed £21.6m to support GOV.UK Notify, a multi-channel digital communications platform.

"These messages will typically be status updates, requests for action, receipts of applications or supporting information, and reminders," the notice said.

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Kees Cook, a Google software engineer who has devoted much of his time to security features in the Linux kernel, has posted about continuing problems in the kernel which he said have insufficient focus.

"The stable kernel releases ('bug fixes only') each contain close to 100 new fixes per week," he said. This puts pressure on Linux vendors – including those who support the countless products which run Linux – to "ignore all the fixes, pick out only 'important' fixes, or face the daunting task of taking everything," he said.

Continue reading84-year-old fined €250,000 for keeping Nazi war machines – including tank – in basement Spared prison but must give Panther and AA gun to collector or museum

An 84-year-old German man has been fined €250,000 (£212,796.10) for keeping stockpiles of Second World War-era weaponry in his basement – including a 45-ton tank.

The conviction under Germany's War Weapons Control Act was handed down in Kiel, a city in the northern state of Schleswig-Holstein, and regards an investigation from 2015.

As we reported at the time, a search for stolen Nazi art at the elderly man's home actually turned up multiple items of military hardware in his underground garage.

Continue readingSueball over breach of more than 5 million payment cards at Dixons Carphone hit for six Last claim standing relegated to the County Court after judge's ruling

A Brit who tried to sue Dixons Carphone over the 2018 hack of 10 million customers' details, including 5.9 million payment cards, has had his case booted out of the High Court.

Not only was Cardix owner DSG Retail Ltd almost completely successful in its application to strike out Darren Warren's case against it, the one count Dixons didn't succeed on saw the case relegated to the county court because of its low value.

Warren wanted to sue the retailer over a digital break-in that saw nearly 6,000 point-of-sale terminals infected with malware. DSG discovered the data-slurping malware almost a year after it was planted, prompting a £500,000 fine from the Information Commissioner's Office.

Continue readingGet ready to make processes fit the software when shifting to SAP's cloud, users told Business teams might want to look at their operating models post-pandemic, user groups suggest

SAP customers need to change the way they operate to shift their ERP systems to the cloud, according to the CEO of the Americas' SAP Users' group (ASUG).

Responding to the results of a joint survey between ASUG and German-speaking user group DSAG, which showed some scepticism towards SAP's lift-and-shift package, Geoff Scott said users would have to look again at how they had customised their SAP ERP systems to fit their business processes.

"The traditional on-prem, highly customised ERP solution, absolutely, positively has to give way to a more SaaS-based ERP solution," he said.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3CiqJiD