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China sets goal of running single-stack IPv6 network by 2030, orders upgrade blitz
Monday, 26 July 2021 10:45

HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 27 Jul 2021 02:00:15 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/4c219a18bc536a8aa7db9b0c3186de409fcd74a7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/ba48ef64d8ea9f9489df59ffef9724ed8ce06b7e/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/ba48ef64d8ea9f9489df59ffef9724ed8ce06b7e/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 27 Jul 2021 02:00:15 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 675245e7d90716b1-SYD China sets goal of running single-stack IPv6 network by 2030, orders upgrade blitz • The Register

All levels of industry and government told to get moving, consumers encouraged to buy new Wi-Fi routers


China's Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission and Cyberspace Administration have set out a plan for massive adoption of IPv6.

A Notice on Accelerating the Large-scale Deployment and Application of IPv6 posted last Friday calls for China to have 700 million active IPv6 users by 2023, plus 200 million Internet of Things devices using the protocol.

Also by 2023, home wireless routers will be required to enable and fully support IPv6 by default, with 30 per cent of the national fleet using the protocol. Other consumer devices will be required to bake in IPv6. Half of mobile traffic will use the newer protocol and 15 per cent of metropolitan area network traffic will be routed by IPv6.

By the end of 2023, new networks won't be allowed to use IPv4 – a change that signals progress in China's vision of a single IPv6 networking stack for the nation.

By 2025, the IPv6 user population will be 800 million, 400 million IoT devices will use the protocol, and 70 per cent of mobile traffic will run over IPv6. Also in 2025, government websites will be required to use IPv6, as will 20 per cent of metropolitan area network traffic. Half the national home router fleet will use the protocol.

By that time, 95 per cent of major commercial websites and mobile internet applications will be required to offer IPv6 support.

The notice suggests that another five years will be required to complete China's IPv6 rollout and achieve a "single stack" network.

The document outlines a vast array of research and industry development activities to hasten the shift to IPv6, but also requires private enterprise – especially tech operations like cloud providers and content delivery networks – to ensure their offerings run on IPv6.

China already has the infrastructure to conduct such tests. In April 2021, the nation opened a "Future Internet Test Infrastructure" comprised of 31 nodes, all connected by 200Gbps links. IPv6 testing is one of facility's main jobs.

China's IPv6 push is not new – in 2017 the nation issued an Action Plan for Promoting Large-scale Deployment of Internet Protocol Version 6 that called for adoption.

The recent notice states that "significant progress" was made under that plan, but also points out that the nation's 14th Five-Year Plan calls for building digital infrastructure.

The notice is about advancing existing plans with new details, rather than striking off in a new direction.

However, the document's commitment to a "single stack" is novel.

By the end of 2023, new networks won't be allowed to use IPv4

Akamai's State of the Internet Report asserts that 23.5 per cent of Chinese internet connections use IPv6 – an adoption rate that places it 32nd among all nations. (India's 60.3 per cent puts it way out in front of Malaysia, Japan, Germany and Belgium – the only other nations with more than 45 per cent adoption.)

The Register is aware of no other nation advocating for a single-stack IPv6 network, never mind its implementation in around nine years.

China's efforts are seen as essential to its security, and achieving other national priorities including mass 5G rollouts to support pervasive use of IoT devices, all feeding data into mighty AI engines that let the Communist Party optimise the nation's affairs. ®

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Apple on Monday patched a zero-day vulnerability in its iOS, iPadOS, and macOS operating systems, only a week after issuing a set of OS updates addressing about three dozen other flaws.

The bug, CVE-2021-30807, was found in the iGiant's IOMobileFrameBuffer code, a kernel extension for managing the screen frame buffer that could be abused to run malicious code on the affected device.

CVE-2021-30807, credited to an anonymous researcher, has been addressed by undisclosed but purportedly improved memory handling code.

Continue readingBezos offers to knock $2bn off his bill to NASA to stay in the running for Moon contract It's not a bribe when it's a payment waiver

Blue Origins supremo Jeff Bezos has offered NASA a $2bn discount to keep his dream alive of transporting the next American man and first woman to the Moon's surface.

Earlier this year, the contract for the Human Landing System (HLS), the craft that will put a crew on the Moon as part of NASA’s lunar Artemis program, was solely awarded to SpaceX. Blue Origin and Dynetics complained to the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) that this was unfair: in their mind, NASA was reneging on a promise to keep the process of selecting a lander competitive by just defaulting to SpaceX.

NASA later retracted its decision to side just with Elon Musk's SpaceX. Blue Origin essentially wants to stay in the race to produce a lander for the Moon mission, and has made a bunch of offers to NASA to make that happen.

Continue readingDell won't ship energy-hungry PCs to California and five other US states due to power regulations Energy efficiency rules appears to be limiting the availability of gaming rigs

Dell is no longer shipping energy-hungry gaming PCs to certain states in America because they demand more energy than local standards allow.

Customers seeking to purchase, for example, an Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition R10 Gaming Desktop from Dell's website and have it shipped to California are now presented with a message that tells buyers they're out of luck.

"This product cannot be shipped to the states of California, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont or Washington due to power consumption regulations adopted by those states," the website says. "Any orders placed that are bound for those states will be canceled."

Continue readingYou, too, can be a Windows domain controller and do whatever you like, with this one weird WONTFIX trick Microsoft offers some mitigations for thwarting PetitPotam attacks

Microsoft completed a vulnerability hat-trick this month as yet another security weakness was uncovered in its operating systems. And this one doesn't even need authentication to work its magic.

The security shortcoming can be exploited using the wonderfully named PetitPotam technique. It involves abusing Redmond's MS-EFSRPC (Encrypting File System Remote Protocol) to take over a corporate Windows network. It seems ideal for penetration testers, and miscreants who have gained a foothold in a Windows network.

Specifically, security researcher Gilles Lionel found it was possible to use MS-EFSRPC force a device, including Windows domain controllers, to authenticate with a remote attacker-controlled NTLM relay. The end result is an authentication certificate that grants the attacker domain-controller-level access to services, allowing them to commandeer the entire domain.

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Although "late 2023" might sound a long way off, the timeline has revealed that "discussion" of the contentious FLoC (Federated Learning of Cohorts) is planned to end in Q3 2021 – just a couple of months away – and that discussion for First Party Sets, rejected by the W3C Technical Architecture Group as " harmful to the web in its current form," is scheduled to end around mid-November.

Continue readingRemember the bloke who was told by Zen Internet to contact his MP about crap service? Yeah, it's still not fixed Fear not! Issue is at the 'highest level of escalation,' says ISP

A broadband customer from Leatherhead, Surrey, who was told to "speak to your MP" after his ISP failed to resolve repeated line disconnections has now been informed he can leave his contract without penalty after Openreach failed to resolve the problem.

Alan Brown, a network manager at a Russell Group University, got in touch with us in February exasperated at the poor service he was experiencing and the contradictory information he'd received from his ISP, Rochdale-based Zen Internet, and Openreach engineers.

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The south side of the nation had a great month for exports as the daily average for the first 20 days of July grew by 32.8 percent year-on-year. Data released by the Korea Customs Service detailed a year-on-year increase in semiconductors by 33.9 per cent, wireless communication by 68.1 per cent, and industrial precision equipment by 15.1 per cent. Meanwhile, figures decreased for computer peripheral equipment by 7.8 per cent.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 27 Jul 2021 02:00:15 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/4c219a18bc536a8aa7db9b0c3186de409fcd74a7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/ba48ef64d8ea9f9489df59ffef9724ed8ce06b7e/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/ba48ef64d8ea9f9489df59ffef9724ed8ce06b7e/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 27 Jul 2021 02:00:15 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 675245e7d90716b1-SYD China sets goal of running single-stack IPv6 network by 2030, orders upgrade blitz • The Register

All levels of industry and government told to get moving, consumers encouraged to buy new Wi-Fi routers


China's Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission and Cyberspace Administration have set out a plan for massive adoption of IPv6.

A Notice on Accelerating the Large-scale Deployment and Application of IPv6 posted last Friday calls for China to have 700 million active IPv6 users by 2023, plus 200 million Internet of Things devices using the protocol.

Also by 2023, home wireless routers will be required to enable and fully support IPv6 by default, with 30 per cent of the national fleet using the protocol. Other consumer devices will be required to bake in IPv6. Half of mobile traffic will use the newer protocol and 15 per cent of metropolitan area network traffic will be routed by IPv6.

By the end of 2023, new networks won't be allowed to use IPv4 – a change that signals progress in China's vision of a single IPv6 networking stack for the nation.

By 2025, the IPv6 user population will be 800 million, 400 million IoT devices will use the protocol, and 70 per cent of mobile traffic will run over IPv6. Also in 2025, government websites will be required to use IPv6, as will 20 per cent of metropolitan area network traffic. Half the national home router fleet will use the protocol.

By that time, 95 per cent of major commercial websites and mobile internet applications will be required to offer IPv6 support.

The notice suggests that another five years will be required to complete China's IPv6 rollout and achieve a "single stack" network.

The document outlines a vast array of research and industry development activities to hasten the shift to IPv6, but also requires private enterprise – especially tech operations like cloud providers and content delivery networks – to ensure their offerings run on IPv6.

China already has the infrastructure to conduct such tests. In April 2021, the nation opened a "Future Internet Test Infrastructure" comprised of 31 nodes, all connected by 200Gbps links. IPv6 testing is one of facility's main jobs.

China's IPv6 push is not new – in 2017 the nation issued an Action Plan for Promoting Large-scale Deployment of Internet Protocol Version 6 that called for adoption.

The recent notice states that "significant progress" was made under that plan, but also points out that the nation's 14th Five-Year Plan calls for building digital infrastructure.

The notice is about advancing existing plans with new details, rather than striking off in a new direction.

However, the document's commitment to a "single stack" is novel.

By the end of 2023, new networks won't be allowed to use IPv4

Akamai's State of the Internet Report asserts that 23.5 per cent of Chinese internet connections use IPv6 – an adoption rate that places it 32nd among all nations. (India's 60.3 per cent puts it way out in front of Malaysia, Japan, Germany and Belgium – the only other nations with more than 45 per cent adoption.)

The Register is aware of no other nation advocating for a single-stack IPv6 network, never mind its implementation in around nine years.

China's efforts are seen as essential to its security, and achieving other national priorities including mass 5G rollouts to support pervasive use of IoT devices, all feeding data into mighty AI engines that let the Communist Party optimise the nation's affairs. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

Apple on Monday patched a zero-day vulnerability in its iOS, iPadOS, and macOS operating systems, only a week after issuing a set of OS updates addressing about three dozen other flaws.

The bug, CVE-2021-30807, was found in the iGiant's IOMobileFrameBuffer code, a kernel extension for managing the screen frame buffer that could be abused to run malicious code on the affected device.

CVE-2021-30807, credited to an anonymous researcher, has been addressed by undisclosed but purportedly improved memory handling code.

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Continue readingDell won't ship energy-hungry PCs to California and five other US states due to power regulations Energy efficiency rules appears to be limiting the availability of gaming rigs

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Customers seeking to purchase, for example, an Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition R10 Gaming Desktop from Dell's website and have it shipped to California are now presented with a message that tells buyers they're out of luck.

"This product cannot be shipped to the states of California, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont or Washington due to power consumption regulations adopted by those states," the website says. "Any orders placed that are bound for those states will be canceled."

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Microsoft completed a vulnerability hat-trick this month as yet another security weakness was uncovered in its operating systems. And this one doesn't even need authentication to work its magic.

The security shortcoming can be exploited using the wonderfully named PetitPotam technique. It involves abusing Redmond's MS-EFSRPC (Encrypting File System Remote Protocol) to take over a corporate Windows network. It seems ideal for penetration testers, and miscreants who have gained a foothold in a Windows network.

Specifically, security researcher Gilles Lionel found it was possible to use MS-EFSRPC force a device, including Windows domain controllers, to authenticate with a remote attacker-controlled NTLM relay. The end result is an authentication certificate that grants the attacker domain-controller-level access to services, allowing them to commandeer the entire domain.

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Alan Brown, a network manager at a Russell Group University, got in touch with us in February exasperated at the poor service he was experiencing and the contradictory information he'd received from his ISP, Rochdale-based Zen Internet, and Openreach engineers.

On one day alone he told us he'd experienced no fewer than 28 breaks in service.

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The south side of the nation had a great month for exports as the daily average for the first 20 days of July grew by 32.8 percent year-on-year. Data released by the Korea Customs Service detailed a year-on-year increase in semiconductors by 33.9 per cent, wireless communication by 68.1 per cent, and industrial precision equipment by 15.1 per cent. Meanwhile, figures decreased for computer peripheral equipment by 7.8 per cent.

The increases are welcome news to many given the pandemic-related supply issues seen globally last year and this, specifically those in the semiconductor industry.

Continue readingBrit reseller given 2022 court date for £270m Microsoft SaaS licence sueball's first hearing End of March for ValueLicensing's jurisdictional defence

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A High Court hearing of Microsoft's attempt to strike out ValueLicensing's case will take place on 30-31 March 2022, the British company announced in a statement today.

Jon Horley, founder and MD of ValueLicensing, said: "This High Court claim covers the damage to our business through Microsoft's abuse of its dominant market position, effectively destroying the pre-owned software market for desktop products. We are not the only victim to have suffered loss as a result of Microsoft's anticompetitive activity since 2016."

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Debian is an important distribution in its own right, but also influential since it is the basis for many others including Ubuntu, Mint, Devuan, Knoppix, Tails, Raspbian, Pop!_OS, SteamOS and more.

In a post to the developer announcements mailing list, the release team said: "We plan to release on 2021-08-14." This is a little over two years since the release of Debian 10 "Buster," which came out 6 July 2019. The testing release is now "completely frozen" other than to "emergency bug fixes."

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That data covers the 20,000 or so proteins made in the human body, and is available for anyone to study. The proteomes of 20 other organisms, from Zebrafish to E.coli bacteria, are also in there, too, and hundreds of millions of more structures will be added over time, we're told.

“In the hands of scientists around the world, this new protein almanac will enable and accelerate research that will advance our understanding of these building blocks of life,” said DeepMind’s CEO Demis Hassabis. He hopes that it will be a valuable resource that will be used in the discovery of new drugs and our understanding of diseases.

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Printer ink continues to rank as one of the most expensive liquids around with a litre of the home office essential costing the same as a very high-end bottle of bubbly or an oak-aged Cognac.

Consumer advocate Which? has found that ink bought from printer manufactures can be up to 286 per cent more expensive than third-party alternatives.

Dipping its nib in one inkwell before delicately wiping off the excess on some blotting paper, Which? found that a multipack of colour ink (cyan, magenta, yellow) for the WorkForce WF-7210DTW printer costs £75.49 from Epson.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3i3uXTi