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UK.gov's Huawei watchdog says firm made 'no overall improvement' on firmware security but won't say why
Wednesday, 21 July 2021 03:09

HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 21 Jul 2021 02:00:05 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/4c219a18bc536a8aa7db9b0c3186de409fcd74a7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/c649bdbbc641e8ba574dc0a59f48a6bba8316bf7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/c649bdbbc641e8ba574dc0a59f48a6bba8316bf7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 21 Jul 2021 02:00:05 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6720d56a288662d9-SYD UK.gov's Huawei watchdog says firm made 'no overall improvement' on firmware security but won't say why • The Register

HCSEC board's 2020 report filled with pats on back for Chinese biz


Huawei has made "no overall improvement" in software engineering processes for its UK telecoms equipment's firmware, its GCHQ overseers have warned.

The Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Cell (HCSEC) oversight board's annual report for 2020 was noticeably less critical than in previous years – but still says Huawei is dragging its feet in key areas.

The Chinese biz has made "considerable progress on the rectification of boards containing an old and out-of-mainstream-support component, and progress on binary equivalence, fixed access issue, and vulnerability management in line with expectations", the HCSEC Oversight Board (OB) said in today's report.

But on the flip side, the report also said Huawei had not met the "product software engineering and cyber security quality expected" by GCHQ offshoot the National Cyber Security Centre. Unlike 2018's detailed report, no further information was given in the latest HCSEC publication as to how or why Huawei had failed to deliver. One detail was included, however: the use of an unidentified (and no longer supported) realtime OS in some network equipment.

The NCSC did not acknowledge The Register's request for more information on other failures by Huawei.

The Cell, as it is known in British government circles, was established a decade ago to review the security of Huawei firmware when far-sighted civil servants realised the Chinese company's products posed a potential risk to British national security.

Chaired by National Cyber Security Centre chief exec Lindy Cameron, the OB produces annual reports on Huawei's security practices. When these became of intense political interest in 2019 and 2020 thanks to US pressure on its allies to cancel Huawei contracts, UK government appears to have responded by watering down criticism of the Chinese firm's practices in favour of soothing words about improvements.

A Huawei spokesperson commented in a prepared statement: "The report concludes Huawei has made 'sustained progress' in addressing issues highlighted in previous reports and has made 'considerable progress' in third-party component support, which in the context of the global pandemic, the report describes as 'remarkable'. Rapidly evolving technologies present all innovators with security challenges and Huawei, as the only vendor to operate under a transparency centre (HCSEC), always strives to achieve the highest standards to keep our customers safe."

While some things have doubtless improved, the fact that the OB is confident enough to state that Huawei has made no overall progress while failing to explain how or why that is, perhaps suggests that political pressure has been brought.

Britain's National Security Adviser, currently Sir Stephen Lovegrove, formally receives the OB report and presents it to Parliament. Lovegrove is a former permanent secretary of the Ministry of Defence, having been promoted to NSA under the current Conservative government.

Instead of following the trend of previous years and stating openly what Huawei is getting wrong, the OB hopes Britain's upcoming Telecommunications Security Bill will "provide improved technical assurance in the security risk management of Huawei equipment in UK networks."

US sanctions (placing Huawei on the State [Foreign] Department's Entity List) had an effect on The Cell's own ability to operate. With HCSEC being, legally, part of Huawei UK, when that company was added to the US sanctions list it ran into difficulties. This forced the creation of a new corporate entity to run The Cell in January 2020 called Cyber Security Evaluations Ltd.

Sanctions imposed by the US banned most Western silicon suppliers from selling to Huawei, including Western-produced designs manufactured abroad. The ban prompted warnings from British ministers that homegrown Chinese chip designs which Huawei proposed using instead could be beyond HCSEC's ability to meaningfully vet.

Huawei has six years left before it will forcibly exit the UK telecoms market, following last year's ban on further purchases of Huawei 5G base stations and other kit intended to build the UK's next gen comms networks. That ban was delayed from the government's preferred 2023 date after mobile network operators raised the huge costs inherent in ripping and replacing one of their main vendors' gear in such a short space of time. ®

Similar topics


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Meanwhile, a make-me-root hole was found in recent Linux kernels.

Recent builds of Windows 10, and the preview of Windows 11, have a misconfigured access control list (ACL) for the Security Account Manager (SAM), SYSTEM, and SECURITY registry hive files. As a result of this blunder, non-administrative users may read these databases, if a VSS shadow copy of the system drive is present, and use their contents to potentially gain elevated privileges. According to a US-CERT advisory, the issue appears to affect Windows 10 build 1809 and newer.

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"Businesses and individuals are already struggling against threats to the integrity of their data from hackers and data thieves,” said Acting US Attorney Talbert in a statement on Monday. "They should not also have to worry about data destruction from former employees seeking retribution."

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Initially, CEO Tim Cook wanted his techies to return to their iCampuses for three days a week starting from September.

However, infectious variants of the COVID-19 bio-nasty, particularly the Delta variant, spreading across America and other nations right now appear to have driven an uptick in cases, and thus have derailed some return-to-office plans. The variants are such a concern that the San Francisco Bay Area, for instance, recommends people continue wearing their masks indoors in public settings regardless of whether they have been vaccinated or not, to curb the rate of infection.

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The developer in question, Wenzheng Tang, has expressed anti-China sentiments on his GitHub profile alongside a flag of Taiwan. He confirmed to The Register he is a Chinese national. We asked Tang for his approval to report on this debate, out of concern for his safety should he be deported from Canada, where he currently resides, as a result of any legal complaints brought against him.

Tang explicitly acknowledged that risk. "If I am deported back to mainland China, I would at least be jailed," he said in an email that may well understate the consequences of public political opposition to the Chinese government. Nonetheless, he sees value in publicity as a form of defense.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 21 Jul 2021 02:00:05 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/4c219a18bc536a8aa7db9b0c3186de409fcd74a7/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/c649bdbbc641e8ba574dc0a59f48a6bba8316bf7/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/c649bdbbc641e8ba574dc0a59f48a6bba8316bf7/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 21 Jul 2021 02:00:05 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6720d56a288662d9-SYD UK.gov's Huawei watchdog says firm made 'no overall improvement' on firmware security but won't say why • The Register

HCSEC board's 2020 report filled with pats on back for Chinese biz


Huawei has made "no overall improvement" in software engineering processes for its UK telecoms equipment's firmware, its GCHQ overseers have warned.

The Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Cell (HCSEC) oversight board's annual report for 2020 was noticeably less critical than in previous years – but still says Huawei is dragging its feet in key areas.

The Chinese biz has made "considerable progress on the rectification of boards containing an old and out-of-mainstream-support component, and progress on binary equivalence, fixed access issue, and vulnerability management in line with expectations", the HCSEC Oversight Board (OB) said in today's report.

But on the flip side, the report also said Huawei had not met the "product software engineering and cyber security quality expected" by GCHQ offshoot the National Cyber Security Centre. Unlike 2018's detailed report, no further information was given in the latest HCSEC publication as to how or why Huawei had failed to deliver. One detail was included, however: the use of an unidentified (and no longer supported) realtime OS in some network equipment.

The NCSC did not acknowledge The Register's request for more information on other failures by Huawei.

The Cell, as it is known in British government circles, was established a decade ago to review the security of Huawei firmware when far-sighted civil servants realised the Chinese company's products posed a potential risk to British national security.

Chaired by National Cyber Security Centre chief exec Lindy Cameron, the OB produces annual reports on Huawei's security practices. When these became of intense political interest in 2019 and 2020 thanks to US pressure on its allies to cancel Huawei contracts, UK government appears to have responded by watering down criticism of the Chinese firm's practices in favour of soothing words about improvements.

A Huawei spokesperson commented in a prepared statement: "The report concludes Huawei has made 'sustained progress' in addressing issues highlighted in previous reports and has made 'considerable progress' in third-party component support, which in the context of the global pandemic, the report describes as 'remarkable'. Rapidly evolving technologies present all innovators with security challenges and Huawei, as the only vendor to operate under a transparency centre (HCSEC), always strives to achieve the highest standards to keep our customers safe."

While some things have doubtless improved, the fact that the OB is confident enough to state that Huawei has made no overall progress while failing to explain how or why that is, perhaps suggests that political pressure has been brought.

Britain's National Security Adviser, currently Sir Stephen Lovegrove, formally receives the OB report and presents it to Parliament. Lovegrove is a former permanent secretary of the Ministry of Defence, having been promoted to NSA under the current Conservative government.

Instead of following the trend of previous years and stating openly what Huawei is getting wrong, the OB hopes Britain's upcoming Telecommunications Security Bill will "provide improved technical assurance in the security risk management of Huawei equipment in UK networks."

US sanctions (placing Huawei on the State [Foreign] Department's Entity List) had an effect on The Cell's own ability to operate. With HCSEC being, legally, part of Huawei UK, when that company was added to the US sanctions list it ran into difficulties. This forced the creation of a new corporate entity to run The Cell in January 2020 called Cyber Security Evaluations Ltd.

Sanctions imposed by the US banned most Western silicon suppliers from selling to Huawei, including Western-produced designs manufactured abroad. The ban prompted warnings from British ministers that homegrown Chinese chip designs which Huawei proposed using instead could be beyond HCSEC's ability to meaningfully vet.

Huawei has six years left before it will forcibly exit the UK telecoms market, following last year's ban on further purchases of Huawei 5G base stations and other kit intended to build the UK's next gen comms networks. That ban was delayed from the government's preferred 2023 date after mobile network operators raised the huge costs inherent in ripping and replacing one of their main vendors' gear in such a short space of time. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

Move over, PrintNightmare. Microsoft has another privilege-escalation hole in Windows that can be potentially exploited by rogue users and malware to gain admin-level powers.

Meanwhile, a make-me-root hole was found in recent Linux kernels.

Recent builds of Windows 10, and the preview of Windows 11, have a misconfigured access control list (ACL) for the Security Account Manager (SAM), SYSTEM, and SECURITY registry hive files. As a result of this blunder, non-administrative users may read these databases, if a VSS shadow copy of the system drive is present, and use their contents to potentially gain elevated privileges. According to a US-CERT advisory, the issue appears to affect Windows 10 build 1809 and newer.

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Former journalist Matthew Keys, who served two years in prison for posting his Tribune Company content management system credentials online a decade ago in violation of America's Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, has been ordered back to prison for violating the terms of his supervised release.

On Monday, Keys, 34, a resident of Vacaville, California, received an additional six-month sentence and 18 months of supervision with computer monitoring requirements, according to the US Attorney's Office of the Eastern District of California. The sentence follows from a judge's finding that Keyes intentionally deleted a YouTube account he was managing on behalf of his then employer, Comstock’s Magazine.

"Businesses and individuals are already struggling against threats to the integrity of their data from hackers and data thieves,” said Acting US Attorney Talbert in a statement on Monday. "They should not also have to worry about data destruction from former employees seeking retribution."

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Initially, CEO Tim Cook wanted his techies to return to their iCampuses for three days a week starting from September.

However, infectious variants of the COVID-19 bio-nasty, particularly the Delta variant, spreading across America and other nations right now appear to have driven an uptick in cases, and thus have derailed some return-to-office plans. The variants are such a concern that the San Francisco Bay Area, for instance, recommends people continue wearing their masks indoors in public settings regardless of whether they have been vaccinated or not, to curb the rate of infection.

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The developer in question, Wenzheng Tang, has expressed anti-China sentiments on his GitHub profile alongside a flag of Taiwan. He confirmed to The Register he is a Chinese national. We asked Tang for his approval to report on this debate, out of concern for his safety should he be deported from Canada, where he currently resides, as a result of any legal complaints brought against him.

Tang explicitly acknowledged that risk. "If I am deported back to mainland China, I would at least be jailed," he said in an email that may well understate the consequences of public political opposition to the Chinese government. Nonetheless, he sees value in publicity as a form of defense.

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Amazon was built on traditional relational databases from the beginning. Long before the ecommerce giant launched AWS, it used Oracle to support its consumer operations, handling the core of its retail transactional systems.

"Amazon had used these Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) databases to process and store data for everything from payments information, wallets, ordering data, our inventory, through to our fulfillment centers and our identity management for customers," explains Thomas Park, Senior Software Development Manager for Consumer’s Business Data Technologies at Amazon.

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However, we know you also like to know about daft people doing strange, absurd or unusual things for no obvious reason, so here's a roundup of some of that.

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Wally Funk has finally gone to space, accompanied by the Bezos bros and Oliver Daemen aboard Blue Origin's sub-orbital New Shepard.

It has been a long time coming. Funk was part of the group dubbed the Mercury 13, a group of women who underwent what were essentially the same tests as NASA's Mercury astronauts. Infamously, the project was cancelled and none of the members ever flew in space.

It would take more than 20 years before Sally Ride became the first US woman in space in 1983. Over a decade later, Eileen Collins became the first female Space Shuttle pilot and, later, the first female Commander.

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The flaw, discovered by Orange Group security researcher Cyrille Chatras and sent to Fortinet privately for responsible disclosure, lies in FortiManager and FortiAnalyzer's fgfmsd daemon, which if running and vulnerable can be exploited over the network.

"A Use After Free (CWE-416) vulnerability in [the] FortiManager and FortiAnalyzer fgfmsd daemon may allow a remote, non-authenticated attacker to execute unauthorised code as root via sending a specifically crafted request to the FGFM port of the targeted device," the vendor warned customers.

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The OS update also improves efficiency. "We still have a lot of people using devices with just 1GB of RAM," the team explained. "OTA-18 almost always feels faster than OTA-17 on the same device."

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The proposals – to be adopted by the Digital Markets Unit (DMU), a fledgling division trailed last November that sits within the UK's Competition Markets Authority – would force tech megacorps to follow new rules of "acceptable behaviour with competitors and customers."

It's the latest step in the shuffling bureaucratic process of scoping out the DMU's role and embarking on a consultation process before finally giving it the legal authority to actually do something.

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"Last week we experienced technical difficulties with our self-service ticket machines, which meant all have had to be taken offline," a spokesperson for Northern Trains confirmed to the The Register.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3hUJHny