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319 terabits – great Scott! Boffins in Japan speed along information superhighway at new world record
Monday, 19 July 2021 23:03

HTTP/2 200 date: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 14:00:05 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/5e3b42887de55c95121fd13d3d97af106450bb4e/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/0cc922c7cb49cae9d575c0715e1a343954e8a091/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/0cc922c7cb49cae9d575c0715e1a343954e8a091/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 14:00:05 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 671479583bb562d3-SYD 319 terabits – great Scott! Boffins in Japan speed along information superhighway at new world record • The Register

System compatible with existing infra. No you can't eat it now, kids, it's for later, for upcoming 5G backbone


Japanese researchers have broken the world record for the fastest internet speed by transmitting data at 319 terabits per second (Tbps) using modern day compatible fibre optical cable, according to the country's primary comms research institute.

The 3,001km (1,864 miles) optical fibre was designed by engineers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) Network Research Institute.

The boffins used 4 cores within the fibre to transmit the data, and applied wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM), allowing multiple wavelengths to be sent simultaneously over a single strand of fibre. The individual WDM channels, numbering 552 in this case, were then modulated to form multiple signal sequences at alternate intervals.

The team employed a band that has never before been used in for long distance transmissions before, the S-band (1,460-1,530nm), alongside the usual C and L-bands.

Every 70km of the experimental set-up, the signal was subjected to amplifiers doped with rare earth ions, some with thulium, others with erbium. The boffins also used Raman amplification distributed along the transmission fibre itself to boost the signal.

The researchers said the system was compatible with modern-day infrastructure and shouldn't take long to adopt because the fibre still has a standard outer diameter of 0.125mm.

But while it may look like your normal fibre from the outside, the transmission rate is 79 per cent faster than the previous world record set at University College London (UCL) in August 2020. The previous data transmission rate of 178Tbps could download the entire Netflix library in less than a second.

While these fibres won't be making it into homes any time soon, they'll likely benefit the wider networking structure.

In their canned statement, NICT said:

The results of this experiment were published at the International Conference on Optical Fiber Communication in June and announced in English this week. ®

Similar topics


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The purchase would see Zoom combining its broader comms platform with Five9's CCaaS product. Zoom also mentioned in its press materials the opportunity for both companies to cross-sell to their existing clients.

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It has been nearly a year since Paragon submitted code for a read-write NTFS driver in the Linux kernel. The existing kernel driver is read-only, although another, a FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace) driver, is read/write.

Despite multiple rounds of reviews (now up to v26 by our reckoning) the driver has continued to miss merge windows, the latest for the 5.14 kernel occurring earlier this month.

Continue readingCassandra 4.0 release held back after Apple engineer discovers last-minute bug Bid to build the most stable iteration of the columnar database has its price

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Project contributors had committed to making the much-anticipated release the most stable yet and wanted to ensure it shipped with no known issues. But the world will have to wait a little longer for the release, previously slated for 8am BST, 19 July.

"In preparing the 4.0 GA release, the Apache Cassandra community identified a fix to be made late Friday. Because of this, the release is being held until the fix is complete. We will share the new release time as soon as we know," a community spokesperson said.

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Setting itself the paradoxical ambitions of getting people out and about while also appealing to new audiences through smartphone gaming, the 300-year-old government-owned company has a balance to strike.

Mike Hawkyard, head of mobile games at Ordnance Survey, told The Register that the company already has a prototype up and running as a result of its £300,000 deal with developer PRELOADED, signed in November last year.

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Where once simple posters might have hung, smart signs are so smart these days that they require antivirus software to stop miscreants doing dastardly deeds. And for this sign, the fight seems to be over.

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The company has an admirably sustainable business model that comes close to the fabled circular supply chain. It gets its raw material from confidential conversations with its paying clients, mixes that data up in its giant cauldron of proprietary analytics, and then sells it back to them and their peers. Rinse and repeat. It has considerable influence on the market with its Magic Quadrants of who's in and who's out, and as these people tend to be those clients again, we have to take it on trust that no undue influence comes attached to large cheques. Which, of course, we do.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 14:00:05 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/5e3b42887de55c95121fd13d3d97af106450bb4e/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/0cc922c7cb49cae9d575c0715e1a343954e8a091/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/0cc922c7cb49cae9d575c0715e1a343954e8a091/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 14:00:05 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 671479583bb562d3-SYD 319 terabits – great Scott! Boffins in Japan speed along information superhighway at new world record • The Register

System compatible with existing infra. No you can't eat it now, kids, it's for later, for upcoming 5G backbone


Japanese researchers have broken the world record for the fastest internet speed by transmitting data at 319 terabits per second (Tbps) using modern day compatible fibre optical cable, according to the country's primary comms research institute.

The 3,001km (1,864 miles) optical fibre was designed by engineers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) Network Research Institute.

The boffins used 4 cores within the fibre to transmit the data, and applied wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM), allowing multiple wavelengths to be sent simultaneously over a single strand of fibre. The individual WDM channels, numbering 552 in this case, were then modulated to form multiple signal sequences at alternate intervals.

The team employed a band that has never before been used in for long distance transmissions before, the S-band (1,460-1,530nm), alongside the usual C and L-bands.

Every 70km of the experimental set-up, the signal was subjected to amplifiers doped with rare earth ions, some with thulium, others with erbium. The boffins also used Raman amplification distributed along the transmission fibre itself to boost the signal.

The researchers said the system was compatible with modern-day infrastructure and shouldn't take long to adopt because the fibre still has a standard outer diameter of 0.125mm.

But while it may look like your normal fibre from the outside, the transmission rate is 79 per cent faster than the previous world record set at University College London (UCL) in August 2020. The previous data transmission rate of 178Tbps could download the entire Netflix library in less than a second.

While these fibres won't be making it into homes any time soon, they'll likely benefit the wider networking structure.

In their canned statement, NICT said:

The results of this experiment were published at the International Conference on Optical Fiber Communication in June and announced in English this week. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

Sponsored It’s easy to spot data center operators, says Jonathon Lundstrom: “They’re the folks with the frazzled hair.”

After all, says Lundstrom, who is director of business development for Nokia’s webscale organization, “They're the ones making sure that all the lights stay on, that traffic keeps flowing, and they're the ones who are the most concerned about risk management.” For data center network operators, stability is everything. But designing network and data center infrastructure for stability from the outset is just the first challenge. Maintaining that stability in day-to-day operations is another. And then there’s the challenge of troubleshooting and remediating when something, inevitably, goes wrong, ideally without making things worse in the process.

An additional complication for infrastructure teams over the last ten years has been the revolution in applications development wrought by DevOps, and how this affects the way organizations manage compute, storage and – to a lesser extent so far – network infrastructure.

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Zoom is making a full-blown entry into the cloudy Unified Comms business by hoovering up Contact-Centre-as-a-Service (CCaaS) outfit Five9 in an all-share transaction valued at a whopping $14.7bn.

Five9 produces cloud-based contact centre software: a suite of applications built to manage customer interactions across multiple channels. The company is a relative minnow, but – according to analysts, at least – the deal has "strategic merit" for Zoom by making it less dependent on the crowded videoconferencing market.

The purchase would see Zoom combining its broader comms platform with Five9's CCaaS product. Zoom also mentioned in its press materials the opportunity for both companies to cross-sell to their existing clients.

Continue readingA beefy Linux 5.14-rc2 and light at the end of the tunnel for Paragon's NTFS driver Torvalds: 'At some point somebody just needs to actually submit it'

The latest release candidate of the 5.14 Linux kernel is a hefty beast, Linus Torvald remarked yesterday, seemingly impatient over how long it is taking Paragon to send in its long-awaited and much-reviewed NTFS driver.

It has been nearly a year since Paragon submitted code for a read-write NTFS driver in the Linux kernel. The existing kernel driver is read-only, although another, a FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace) driver, is read/write.

Despite multiple rounds of reviews (now up to v26 by our reckoning) the driver has continued to miss merge windows, the latest for the 5.14 kernel occurring earlier this month.

Continue readingCassandra 4.0 release held back after Apple engineer discovers last-minute bug Bid to build the most stable iteration of the columnar database has its price

Cassandra 4.0 – the open-source distributed NoSQL database used by Apple, Netflix, and Spotify – has been delayed at the 11th hour after a developer spotted a bug in the code.

Project contributors had committed to making the much-anticipated release the most stable yet and wanted to ensure it shipped with no known issues. But the world will have to wait a little longer for the release, previously slated for 8am BST, 19 July.

"In preparing the 4.0 GA release, the Apache Cassandra community identified a fix to be made late Friday. Because of this, the release is being held until the fix is complete. We will share the new release time as soon as we know," a community spokesperson said.

Continue readingOrdnance Survey to take a poke at Pokémon-style gaming with outdoorsy AR adventure Gamify all the things!

UK map maker Ordnance Survey is bringing a new concept to the mobile gaming market: not looking at your phone.

Setting itself the paradoxical ambitions of getting people out and about while also appealing to new audiences through smartphone gaming, the 300-year-old government-owned company has a balance to strike.

Mike Hawkyard, head of mobile games at Ordnance Survey, told The Register that the company already has a prototype up and running as a result of its £300,000 deal with developer PRELOADED, signed in November last year.

Continue readingPaid antivirus? On ads? Think of all the beer you could buy without that subscription These are a few of our favourite things

Bork!Bork!Bork! Beer and bork: two of our favourite things here at Vulture Central. And also, it seems, at the Co-Op.

In this instance, digital signage that would normally be advertising delicious beer brewed in the Cotswolds (a charming part of the UK) is revealing that the retailer – or, more likely, whoever is responsible for the screens in its stores – has failed to renew the antivirus software.

Where once simple posters might have hung, smart signs are so smart these days that they require antivirus software to stop miscreants doing dastardly deeds. And for this sign, the fight seems to be over.

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Review Traditionally the Darktable project only releases one update a year, with a new version arriving on Christmas day. But the developers behind Darktable have been adding new features and improving existing ones so quickly that one a year is no longer enough.

Going forward, Darktable users can expect two updates a year, one in summer and the other the traditional Christmas day release.

Continue readingWhere on Gartner's Hype Cycle is Gartner's Hype Cycle? That's the way uh-huh uh-huh, I hype it

Column Gartner is an odd fish. A very big odd fish, making some $4bn a year out of its 16,000 souls beavering away in its shiny belly. It acts as soothsayer to the troubled monarchs of industry and whichever of their courtiers can afford a subscription to its reports.

The company has an admirably sustainable business model that comes close to the fabled circular supply chain. It gets its raw material from confidential conversations with its paying clients, mixes that data up in its giant cauldron of proprietary analytics, and then sells it back to them and their peers. Rinse and repeat. It has considerable influence on the market with its Magic Quadrants of who's in and who's out, and as these people tend to be those clients again, we have to take it on trust that no undue influence comes attached to large cheques. Which, of course, we do.

But what if sceptical types want to check? Gartner has branched out from its initial IT focus to providing research and advice to all aspects of business – customer care, legal, HR, you name it. Perhaps we can use some analytics of our own to judge the priorities it offers. The words "strategy" and "strategic" occur nearly 200,000 times on its website; "ethics" just 3,600. But that's an unfair comparison as most of the latter references are to "data ethics"; the other sort, the ones at the core of your company, score just 460 – that's a 438:1 ratio, the square root of strategy.

Continue readingHow to keep your enterprise up to date by deploying the very latest malware Salesmen suffer after suspicious surfing

Who, Me? Start your week with a trip back to the early days of the World Wide Web with a tale of imaging peril and malware malarky from the files of Who, Me?

Today's story comes from a reader whom we shall call "George", for that is not his name, and an experience at what he delicately called "a very large retail store" during the closing years of the last century.

Back then, deployments in George's organisation were based on machine images in order to keep a consistent Standard Operating Environment (SOE) over the fleet. A machine would be set up with the required configuration, which would then be imaged and reused.

Continue readingImpromptu game of Robot Wars sparks fire in warehouse at UK e-tailer Ocado Three-way crash harms no humans but shutters fulfilment centre and sees orders galore cancelled

The Ocado Group, an operator and purveyor of automated warehouse tech for e-tailers, has admitted that three of its robots collided and caused a fire last Friday at its Customer Fulfilment Centre (CFC) in Erith, south-east London.

The company took to Twitter on Saturday with news of cancelled orders and a “major incident”.

Continue readingUS Surgeon General doubles down on Facebook-bashing amid vaccination information blame game The Social Network fires back after President Biden accuses it of 'killing people'

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Things began to heat up between the Biden administration and Facebook last Thursday, when Murthy appeared in a White House press briefing to discuss stalled US vaccination rates.

Although 160 million people and counting are fully vaccinated, two thirds of people who are not hesitate due to common myths about the vaccine, Murthy said. He announced he was therefore issuing a Surgeon General's Advisory on the dangers of health misinformation.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3riwGHp