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Stop. Look... Install Linux? The Reg solves Microsoft's latest Windows teaser
Thursday, 24 June 2021 21:32

HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 25 Jun 2021 14:00:41 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3e3d47f63016ed3f50405db941df6ea6d57fe972/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 25 Jun 2021 14:00:41 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0ae51216e80000fd2697952000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 664eb937da33fd26-SYD Stop. Look... Install Linux? The Reg solves Microsoft's latest Windows teaser • The Register

Going backwards to the future


Fans eagerly awaiting the emission of Windows 11 have been treated to a teaser of today's big event, ending with Microsoft giving us all... the finger?

"Feel what's next for Windows," exhorts Microsoft. Based on Vista and Windows 8, we'd have to say we're getting a sense of impending doom. Or perhaps we should be feeling fluffy… like a cloud. Which, after all, is the direction of travel for Microsoft.

In the past, some at The Reg may have been feeling anticipation for a new version of Windows. Windows 8 put paid to that as the horror of the user interface unfolded. Windows 10 sought to undo the damage while saving a bit of face.

This time around – who knows? Hopefully the freshest OS will include a bit more than the yawn-inducing leaks seen so far. Some have speculated that the emphasis on the eye indicates some form of virtual or augmented reality, while others point to the ear as meaning the arrival of some new Surface audio devices. As for the touching and feeling, well, we shan't be going there.

The solution is simple. Reverse the teaser and you have Stop. Look. Listen.

It is clearly Microsoft's version of the Green Cross Code, except for walking across roads backwards. Arguably less dangerous than entrusting your critical enterprise processes to the public cloud.

Youtube Video

Windows for Walking? Stop. Look. Install Linux? A Clippy for crossing?

While we can't imagine Microsoft boss Satya Nadella donning the garb of the great David Prowse's iconic 1970s road safety campaigner any time soon, it is perhaps worth considering Prowse's other great role, that of Star Wars all-round bad egg, Darth Vader.

Has Microsoft allowed the veneer of years being a pal to open source to crack? Probably not – after all, those subjected to the company's bumbling attempts to make Dark Mode work on Windows 10 over the years are unlikely to be lured to the Dark Side any time soon. ®

Similar topics


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Job AlertThe Register is publishing free job ads to help keep tech professionals in gainful employment during these challenging times.

If you're in the IT sector or trying to hire techies, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and we'll promote them for free.

For those hunting new opportunities, you can get alerts whenever we post new openings here.

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The update from the Oslo-based biz includes messaging features, while video-calling tweaks are aimed at keeping Opera users inside the browser, rather than wandering off to use Chrome or Edge.

A pop-out component in the new browser will "pop" video out of a given tab and keep it on top of all other tabs: handy for users having a crafty browse during those interminable Zoom and Google Meet sessions. Or, as Opera delicately put it, users sometimes get "distracted" and then struggle to find the right tab. A red bar is also placed on the active tab for ease of navigation along with tab-searching for the tab-hoarders among its users.

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Nagayama was at the helm during a recent scandal in which an activist investor alleged that Toshiba's execs had conspired with the Japanese government to pressure shareholders to vote in a way that would minimise the influence of activist foreign investors at last year's general meeting.

An independent investigation [PDF], called by Singaporean fund management company Effissimo, alleged that Toshiba and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry had attempted to prevent submission of proposals and votes from activist shareholders.

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Speaking to The Register, Dr Farah Jameel, BMA GP committee executive team IT lead, said UK data protection law’s requirement for transparency in uses – and change in use – of people’s data calls into question whether the General Practice Data for Planning and Research (GPDPR) should go ahead, given the current state of public interaction.

NHS Digital announced GPDPR in May, saying it planned to place historic data from the nation's general practitioners (GPs) on 55 million people in England into a central repository from 1 July, for the purpose of NHS planning and medical research. The public was told to opt out of the programme by 23 June.

Continue reading‘What are the odds someone will find and exploit this?’ Nice one — you just released an insecure app Who’s to blame: devs or management? And how do we cure application vulnerability epidemic

Feature According to a recently published Osterman Research white paper, 81 per cent of developers admit to knowingly releasing vulnerable apps.

If it were a single piece of research, we might have passed it by, but the 2021 Verizon Mobile Security Index reinforced the point by concluding that some 76 per cent of devs experienced pressure to sacrifice mobile security for expediency. Then there’s the cloud applications angle, with Dynatrace research finding that 71 per cent of CISOs aren’t fully confident that code isn’t free of vulns before going live in production.

The icing on this foul-tasting statistical cake can be found in yet another report suggesting that most mobile apps from Fortune 500 organisations can be compromised in 15 minutes flat.

Continue readingBOFH: Oh for Pete’s sake. Don’t make a spectacle of yourself Just close your eyes and pretend it’s not there. Before you know it, it’ll be the weekend

Episode 9 The Boss is wandering around Mission Control asking thoughtful but pointless questions to give the impression that he really cares, whilst in reality he has some crazy idea percolating in his brain that he wants us to look favourably upon.

“I think the whole building should go mobile — all laptops, no assigned desks, all wireless.” Ah, there we go.

“That’s not a great plan,“ I say. “You know our staff like the comfort and safety of their hidey-holes.

Continue readingWho would cross the Bridge of Death? Answer me these questions three! Oh and you'll need two-factor authentication I'm not the robot, pal, you are

Something for the Weekend, Sir? I have failed the Turing test – again. Apparently I am unable to exhibit intelligent behaviour equivalent to that of a human being.

I am trying to sign into some services I set up ages ago but the Login Lords are having none of it. Quite possibly they are punishing me for having the temerity to disable two-factor authentication, triggering a Spitefulness subroutine which requires them to express their consequential existential crisis by taking it out on me. You're not who you claim to be, they whisper. We think you're lying.

Great. It's 4:00am and I'm being dissed by uppity electrons 6,000 miles away.

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"Ben," for that is not his name, regularly travelled from city to city as part of his job and, being a conscientious type, popped into company offices along the route to deal with any callouts. He and a colleague would arrive early in the morning to diagnose complaints and deal with IT issues faced by staff.

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Backed with £1m of central government taxpayer funding, the SONIC Labs (SmartRAN Open Network Interoperability Centre) in Brighton and London will serve as a testing centre for 5G RAN equipment. The the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has tipped Digital Catapult and Ofcom to administer the facilities.

The facility was conceived to accelerate the UK's adoption of OpenRAN technology. Although in its early stages, OpenRAN has been touted as a potential solution to the UK's bleakly homogenous 5G infrastructure.

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Amazon’s product pages explain that the service only operates in US dollars, and only applies to AWS’s own services — third-party software you buy from the AWS Marketplace is billed as usual.

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 25 Jun 2021 14:00:41 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3e3d47f63016ed3f50405db941df6ea6d57fe972/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 25 Jun 2021 14:00:41 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0ae51216e80000fd2697952000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 664eb937da33fd26-SYD Stop. Look... Install Linux? The Reg solves Microsoft's latest Windows teaser • The Register

Going backwards to the future


Fans eagerly awaiting the emission of Windows 11 have been treated to a teaser of today's big event, ending with Microsoft giving us all... the finger?

"Feel what's next for Windows," exhorts Microsoft. Based on Vista and Windows 8, we'd have to say we're getting a sense of impending doom. Or perhaps we should be feeling fluffy… like a cloud. Which, after all, is the direction of travel for Microsoft.

In the past, some at The Reg may have been feeling anticipation for a new version of Windows. Windows 8 put paid to that as the horror of the user interface unfolded. Windows 10 sought to undo the damage while saving a bit of face.

This time around – who knows? Hopefully the freshest OS will include a bit more than the yawn-inducing leaks seen so far. Some have speculated that the emphasis on the eye indicates some form of virtual or augmented reality, while others point to the ear as meaning the arrival of some new Surface audio devices. As for the touching and feeling, well, we shan't be going there.

The solution is simple. Reverse the teaser and you have Stop. Look. Listen.

It is clearly Microsoft's version of the Green Cross Code, except for walking across roads backwards. Arguably less dangerous than entrusting your critical enterprise processes to the public cloud.

Youtube Video

Windows for Walking? Stop. Look. Install Linux? A Clippy for crossing?

While we can't imagine Microsoft boss Satya Nadella donning the garb of the great David Prowse's iconic 1970s road safety campaigner any time soon, it is perhaps worth considering Prowse's other great role, that of Star Wars all-round bad egg, Darth Vader.

Has Microsoft allowed the veneer of years being a pal to open source to crack? Probably not – after all, those subjected to the company's bumbling attempts to make Dark Mode work on Windows 10 over the years are unlikely to be lured to the Dark Side any time soon. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

Job AlertThe Register is publishing free job ads to help keep tech professionals in gainful employment during these challenging times.

If you're in the IT sector or trying to hire techies, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and we'll promote them for free.

For those hunting new opportunities, you can get alerts whenever we post new openings here.

Continue readingThe phantom of the Opera is here... unveil R5 (just don't let the boss see) She's sitting in a floating popout window for video calls while you get on with your life

Browser veteran Opera has taken a break from selling fintech to issue an update codenamed "R5" to its desktop browser - complete with consumer-friendly music streaming and video-calling features.

The update from the Oslo-based biz includes messaging features, while video-calling tweaks are aimed at keeping Opera users inside the browser, rather than wandering off to use Chrome or Edge.

A pop-out component in the new browser will "pop" video out of a given tab and keep it on top of all other tabs: handy for users having a crafty browse during those interminable Zoom and Google Meet sessions. Or, as Opera delicately put it, users sometimes get "distracted" and then struggle to find the right tab. A red bar is also placed on the active tab for ease of navigation along with tab-searching for the tab-hoarders among its users.

Continue readingWill containers kill VMs? There are no winners in this debateReg readers couldn’t split the argument – perhaps because we kept coming back to containers inside VMs being sensible

Register DebateReg readers have a reputation as never being short of an opinion. So, it is with more than a little surprise that we must declare our latest debate, on the motion Containers will kill Virtual Machines, was a tie!

1,142 of you voted in the debate, and the vote was split right down the line.

Continue readingShareholders give Toshiba chairman the boot following foreign investor voting scandal Alleged exec meetings with Japanese government detailed in explosive report

Toshiba shareholders voted to oust chairman Osamu Nagayama and a member of the company's audit committee, Nobuyuki Kobayashi, during their annual general meeting.

Nagayama was at the helm during a recent scandal in which an activist investor alleged that Toshiba's execs had conspired with the Japanese government to pressure shareholders to vote in a way that would minimise the influence of activist foreign investors at last year's general meeting.

An independent investigation [PDF], called by Singaporean fund management company Effissimo, alleged that Toshiba and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry had attempted to prevent submission of proposals and votes from activist shareholders.

Continue readingBMA warns NHS Digital's own confidentiality guardian could halt English GP data grab unless communication with public improves Data law's transparency requirement currently not being met, according to powerful doctors' union

The UK’s influential doctors’ union reckons NHS Digital’s current communication of its controversial plan to extract patients’ medical histories from GP systems is going so well the government agency’s own enforcer of patient confidentiality could step in and halt the programme.

Speaking to The Register, Dr Farah Jameel, BMA GP committee executive team IT lead, said UK data protection law’s requirement for transparency in uses – and change in use – of people’s data calls into question whether the General Practice Data for Planning and Research (GPDPR) should go ahead, given the current state of public interaction.

NHS Digital announced GPDPR in May, saying it planned to place historic data from the nation's general practitioners (GPs) on 55 million people in England into a central repository from 1 July, for the purpose of NHS planning and medical research. The public was told to opt out of the programme by 23 June.

Continue reading‘What are the odds someone will find and exploit this?’ Nice one — you just released an insecure app Who’s to blame: devs or management? And how do we cure application vulnerability epidemic

Feature According to a recently published Osterman Research white paper, 81 per cent of developers admit to knowingly releasing vulnerable apps.

If it were a single piece of research, we might have passed it by, but the 2021 Verizon Mobile Security Index reinforced the point by concluding that some 76 per cent of devs experienced pressure to sacrifice mobile security for expediency. Then there’s the cloud applications angle, with Dynatrace research finding that 71 per cent of CISOs aren’t fully confident that code isn’t free of vulns before going live in production.

The icing on this foul-tasting statistical cake can be found in yet another report suggesting that most mobile apps from Fortune 500 organisations can be compromised in 15 minutes flat.

Continue readingBOFH: Oh for Pete’s sake. Don’t make a spectacle of yourself Just close your eyes and pretend it’s not there. Before you know it, it’ll be the weekend

Stop. Look... Install Linux? The Reg solves Microsoft's latest Windows teaserEpisode 9 The Boss is wandering around Mission Control asking thoughtful but pointless questions to give the impression that he really cares, whilst in reality he has some crazy idea percolating in his brain that he wants us to look favourably upon.

“I think the whole building should go mobile — all laptops, no assigned desks, all wireless.” Ah, there we go.

“That’s not a great plan,“ I say. “You know our staff like the comfort and safety of their hidey-holes.

Continue readingWho would cross the Bridge of Death? Answer me these questions three! Oh and you'll need two-factor authentication I'm not the robot, pal, you are

Something for the Weekend, Sir? I have failed the Turing test – again. Apparently I am unable to exhibit intelligent behaviour equivalent to that of a human being.

I am trying to sign into some services I set up ages ago but the Login Lords are having none of it. Quite possibly they are punishing me for having the temerity to disable two-factor authentication, triggering a Spitefulness subroutine which requires them to express their consequential existential crisis by taking it out on me. You're not who you claim to be, they whisper. We think you're lying.

Great. It's 4:00am and I'm being dissed by uppity electrons 6,000 miles away.

Continue readingOuch! When the IT equipment is sound, but the setup is hole-y inappropriate Let me draw a picture for you

On Call The week may be over, but the capacity of users to stick things where they shouldn't is far from exhausted. Welcome to another edition of On Call.

Today's tale takes us back to when we worked in offices and the concept of "hot desking" was a fashionable thing that did not require the attention of hazmat-clad workers between sessions.

"Ben," for that is not his name, regularly travelled from city to city as part of his job and, being a conscientious type, popped into company offices along the route to deal with any callouts. He and a colleague would arrive early in the morning to diagnose complaints and deal with IT issues faced by staff.

Continue readingUK cuts ribbon on OpenRAN security and resiliency testing hubs to make sure kit works with 5G infrastructure SONIC the, er, edge... hog?

The Ministry of Fun* has (virtually) cut the ribbon on its latest 5G testing centre to verify the security and resilience of OpenRAN kit seeking a place among the UK's 5G network infrastructure.

Backed with £1m of central government taxpayer funding, the SONIC Labs (SmartRAN Open Network Interoperability Centre) in Brighton and London will serve as a testing centre for 5G RAN equipment. The the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has tipped Digital Catapult and Ofcom to administer the facilities.

The facility was conceived to accelerate the UK's adoption of OpenRAN technology. Although in its early stages, OpenRAN has been touted as a potential solution to the UK's bleakly homogenous 5G infrastructure.

Continue readingAWS offers you the opportunity to pay cloud bills before they’ve been issued Whatever happened to cloud being a super way to preserve cashflow?

Amazon Web Services has started allowing its customers to pay in advance.

As the name implies, a facility called “Advanced Pay” will let you send money to Jeff Bezos before your bill for cloud services has been issued. “Once you add funds to Advance Pay, AWS will automatically use them to pay for your invoices when they become due for payment,” states AWS’s announcement of the service.

Amazon’s product pages explain that the service only operates in US dollars, and only applies to AWS’s own services — third-party software you buy from the AWS Marketplace is billed as usual.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3h7fwro