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'Lots of failed startups came out of Campus': Google axes London hub because startup scene 'doesn't need' another 7 floors of workspace
Tuesday, 22 June 2021 00:32

HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 14:02:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3e3d47f63016ed3f50405db941df6ea6d57fe972/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 14:02:10 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0ad5a060dc000016b5a7150000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 66360347cca016b5-SYD 'Lots of failed startups came out of Campus': Google axes London hub because startup scene 'doesn't need' another 7 floors of workspace • The Register

It needs 'resources, mentors, and programs ... at scale, anywhere'


The COVID-19 pandemic has claimed another casualty: Google Campus, the flash Shoreditch startup hub launched in 2012 to grow London's tech scene.

Google said the pandemic had "demonstrated" it could somehow support the startup community without occupying a seven-storey building in the heart of Central London. The shift to remote working, it added, had allowed it to support fledgling businesses beyond the perimeter of the Tube network.

Lots of failed startups came out of Campus, man. People went there assuming they'd find co-founders and investors. Sometimes it was true, but most of the time it wasn't...

Google also noted the existence of competition from other accelerators and co-working spaces. When the service first launched, WeWork hadn't yet reached the level of ubiquity it now enjoys, San Francisco was still the shining city on the hill, and London had more Angus Steakhouses than accelerators. Now the English capital is a tech hub - at least from investors' point of view - with its startups collectively raising £7.6bn in venture capital funding during 2020 alone.

"Today's founders in London are part of a vibrant ecosystem of 250+ coworking spaces, 35+ accelerators, corporate programs, and thousands of startups providing services to each other," Google said. "The UK startup community doesn't need access to a single shared physical space as much as it needs access to resources, mentors, and programs available at scale, anywhere."

Google said it remained "committed" to the UK's startup scene, and would continue funding initiatives including $2m Black Founders Fund and educational programmes like Startup School.

Unlike competing workspaces, literally anyone with a laptop could show up and toil from the Chocolate Factory's public areas, provided they'd registered in advance. Although seating was perpetually in short supply, if you arrived early enough, we have heard it was a decent place to spend a few hours working without worrying that your laptop would get nicked while you were in the toilets.

"I remember when the tech scene first started bustling in London it was the go-to for any kind of hackathon," said Shad Jahangir, product designer at JustPark.

"I worked in the TechHub on the first floor for a year too. It gave me a weird kind of insight onto the day-to-day there. Lots of failed startups came out of Campus, man. People went there assuming they'd find co-founders and investors. Sometimes it was true, but most of the time it wasn't."

Feeding our, er, minds

"Anyone who has had the opportunity of working on Google Campus will have a plethora of memories, but as any young person starting off their career might attest, it was the free food provided which made a lasting impression," added Heather Delaney, managing director at Gallium Ventures.

"Whether it was the fully stocked kitchen of drinks and snacks, or the bagels which you could grab and run, those coming out of university found a working environment giving away food a bit like Willy Wonka's factory of goodies."

Ahem.

Cathy White, founder of CEW Comms, told us: "Some of my earliest memories getting to know and navigate London's flourishing tech scene happened there. Whether it was attending a Silicon Drinkabout, mentoring, working with the Seedcamp team, or running a Meetup, campus was a space for everything and everyone...

"I won't miss the weird smell the café had or the dodgy lift, but I will miss that sense of community." ®

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Continue readingZephyr OS Bluetooth vulnerabilities left smart devices open to attack The 'S' in 'IoT' stands for 'security'

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A security advisory released by Synopsys this afternoon highlights eight key vulnerabilities in Zephyr's Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) software stack. The least serious of these can lead to a denial-of-service attack by deadlocking the target device; the most serious allow for information leakage or, potentially, remote code execution.

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"Emergency alerts work like a radio broadcast," the government explained. "In an emergency, mobile phone masts in the surrounding area will broadcast an alert. Every compatible mobile phone or tablet in range of a mast will receive the alert. You will get alerts based on your current location – not where you live or work."

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In true Ronseal fashion, this is pretty much what it sounds like. It’s a desk (or, more accurately, a standing desk) pretending to be an exercise bike. Just imagine an exercise bike with the handlebars ripped off, and in their place a small work surface with enough room for a laptop.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 14:02:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3e3d47f63016ed3f50405db941df6ea6d57fe972/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/e9ec0ff9bc8ea6144cc6d516f775d850b00cb41c/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 14:02:10 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0ad5a060dc000016b5a7150000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 66360347cca016b5-SYD 'Lots of failed startups came out of Campus': Google axes London hub because startup scene 'doesn't need' another 7 floors of workspace • The Register

It needs 'resources, mentors, and programs ... at scale, anywhere'


The COVID-19 pandemic has claimed another casualty: Google Campus, the flash Shoreditch startup hub launched in 2012 to grow London's tech scene.

Google said the pandemic had "demonstrated" it could somehow support the startup community without occupying a seven-storey building in the heart of Central London. The shift to remote working, it added, had allowed it to support fledgling businesses beyond the perimeter of the Tube network.

Lots of failed startups came out of Campus, man. People went there assuming they'd find co-founders and investors. Sometimes it was true, but most of the time it wasn't...

Google also noted the existence of competition from other accelerators and co-working spaces. When the service first launched, WeWork hadn't yet reached the level of ubiquity it now enjoys, San Francisco was still the shining city on the hill, and London had more Angus Steakhouses than accelerators. Now the English capital is a tech hub - at least from investors' point of view - with its startups collectively raising £7.6bn in venture capital funding during 2020 alone.

"Today's founders in London are part of a vibrant ecosystem of 250+ coworking spaces, 35+ accelerators, corporate programs, and thousands of startups providing services to each other," Google said. "The UK startup community doesn't need access to a single shared physical space as much as it needs access to resources, mentors, and programs available at scale, anywhere."

Google said it remained "committed" to the UK's startup scene, and would continue funding initiatives including $2m Black Founders Fund and educational programmes like Startup School.

Unlike competing workspaces, literally anyone with a laptop could show up and toil from the Chocolate Factory's public areas, provided they'd registered in advance. Although seating was perpetually in short supply, if you arrived early enough, we have heard it was a decent place to spend a few hours working without worrying that your laptop would get nicked while you were in the toilets.

"I remember when the tech scene first started bustling in London it was the go-to for any kind of hackathon," said Shad Jahangir, product designer at JustPark.

"I worked in the TechHub on the first floor for a year too. It gave me a weird kind of insight onto the day-to-day there. Lots of failed startups came out of Campus, man. People went there assuming they'd find co-founders and investors. Sometimes it was true, but most of the time it wasn't."

Feeding our, er, minds

"Anyone who has had the opportunity of working on Google Campus will have a plethora of memories, but as any young person starting off their career might attest, it was the free food provided which made a lasting impression," added Heather Delaney, managing director at Gallium Ventures.

"Whether it was the fully stocked kitchen of drinks and snacks, or the bagels which you could grab and run, those coming out of university found a working environment giving away food a bit like Willy Wonka's factory of goodies."

Ahem.

Cathy White, founder of CEW Comms, told us: "Some of my earliest memories getting to know and navigate London's flourishing tech scene happened there. Whether it was attending a Silicon Drinkabout, mentoring, working with the Seedcamp team, or running a Meetup, campus was a space for everything and everyone...

"I won't miss the weird smell the café had or the dodgy lift, but I will miss that sense of community." ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

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Dubbed the "biggest data grab in NHS history", the programme has bowed to pressure and put back plans to extract GP data on 55 million people in England to be held in a central repository. The GPDPR was due to launch on 1 July but following a backlash from GPs and privacy campaigners was postponed until 1 September.

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The 64-bit P550 core will be aimed at application processors in data center infrastructure and networking equipment, and higher-end consumer kit. Intel says it will put one or more of the CPUs into a 7nm chipset code-named Horse Creek to show to developers and manufacturers, the idea being that said customers can use the silicon to evaluate SiFive's RISC-V designs for future products.

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Continue readingZephyr OS Bluetooth vulnerabilities left smart devices open to attack The 'S' in 'IoT' stands for 'security'

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The vulnerabilities, discovered through use of Synopsys's Defensics fuzzing software, are exploitable when the devices are in advertising mode and accepting connections from remote devices – putting a wide range of gadgets at risk.

Continue readingContainers have security problems and flexibility issues. VMs will make them viable Never bet against a technology that has matured over decades

Register DebateWelcome to the latest Register Debate in which writers discuss technology topics, and you – the reader – choose the winning argument. The format is simple: we propose a motion, the arguments for the motion will run this Monday and Wednesday, and the arguments against on Tuesday and Thursday.

During the week you can cast your vote on which side you support using the embedded poll, choosing whether you're in favor or against the motion. The final score will be announced on Friday, revealing whether the for or against argument was most popular. It's up to our writers to convince you to vote for their side.

This week's motion is: Containers will kill virtual machines

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Mobile networks across the UK are once again set to panic their users this afternoon as part of a test of the government's Emergency Alerts system – causing selected mobiles to "make a loud, siren-like sound."

Due to launch for full operation this summer, the government Emergency Alerts system is a messaging platform designed to get information out to as many people as possible as quickly as can be.

"Emergency alerts work like a radio broadcast," the government explained. "In an emergency, mobile phone masts in the surrounding area will broadcast an alert. Every compatible mobile phone or tablet in range of a mast will receive the alert. You will get alerts based on your current location – not where you live or work."

Continue readingUK set for 'adequacy' status on data sharing with EU, but it all depends on how much post-Brexit law diverges TIGRR threatens to bounce through unacceptable changes to the rules

The European Union has formally voted for proposals to give the UK "adequate" status in its data protection laws, allowing data sharing to continue in the post-Brexit world.

But the move could prove temporary if the UK were to move too far from the principles of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in its ambition to be a global tech juggernaut.

Voting through the draft "Commission Implementing Decisions on the adequate protection of personal data by the United Kingdom", the Committee on the Protection of Individuals with Regard to the Processing of Personal Data adopted the proposals for data sharing.

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Exclusive MI5's storage of personal data on espionage subjects is still facing "legal compliance risk" issues despite years of warnings from spy agency regulator IPCO, a Home Office report has revealed.

The sustained legal issues even triggered a Parliamentary statement by Home Secretary Priti Patel, revealing that the domestic spy agency did not have "a culture of individual accountability for legal compliance risk" until external oversight forced change upon the agency.

Answering the question of whether MI5's data holdings are "now legally compliant," a Home Office report, published on June 7, said MI5's "implementation of mitigations" for "identified risks" was still under way.

Continue readingFlexispot Deskcise Pro V9: Half desk, half exercise bike, and you're all sweaty. How much does it cost again? Not ideal for when you rejoin colleagues in the office

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Billed as a fix for this sedentary lifestyle comes the Flexispot Deskcise Pro V9, which we tried out so you don't have to.

In true Ronseal fashion, this is pretty much what it sounds like. It’s a desk (or, more accurately, a standing desk) pretending to be an exercise bike. Just imagine an exercise bike with the handlebars ripped off, and in their place a small work surface with enough room for a laptop.

Continue readingMonitoring is simple enough – green means everything's fine. But getting to that point can be a whole other ball game Don’t take no for an answer, but be prepared to give it.

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Yet although it's common to find monitoring done pretty well, it's very rare to find it being done brilliantly.

The basic thing you want from your monitoring is to show that, when everything is working within tolerance, all indicators are green. This sounds obvious, but it's far from simple to achieve.

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The firm’s opinion is contained in a post by senior director analyst Akif Khan, who noted that CAPTCHAs create friction for humans but remain an imperfect defence against bots.

Despite all this, Khan argued in support of them, with exceptions.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3d2rVff