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MoD: Our networks are in 'unacceptable' state and both data and IT bods are stuck in silos
Friday, 28 May 2021 23:27

HTTP/2 200 date: Sat, 29 May 2021 14:00:14 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/5ee34de0ca2a5db3b427362aef802ee2cf1ed86c/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/b217c1cda3c68554b700cd6f1a8f0437c49ecaa4/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/b217c1cda3c68554b700cd6f1a8f0437c49ecaa4/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Sat, 29 May 2021 14:00:14 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0a5a05fa5c0000da5231944000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 65703f7098e6da52-SYD MoD: Our networks are in 'unacceptable' state and both data and IT bods are stuck in silos • The Register

So if the generals would lend us a few bob to fix it that'd be nice of them


The Ministry of Defence’s IT systems are “too fragmented, fragile, insecure and obsolescent” and its operators are “mired in industrial age processes and culture,” according to a new digital strategy document.

Published earlier this week, the Digital Strategy for Defence paper is full of the usual MoD management-speak while not once mentioning the word “budget”, raising immediate questions about how the latest glitzy vision of the future would be paid for.

The strategy boutique’s latest output replaced two separate digital strategy and doctrine publications issued in late 2019, and defence procurement minister Jeremy Quin MP noted the “bewildering rate” at which digital technology is upending the staid old Ministry of Defence.

“This Digital Strategy outlines the step-change in approach that is required for Defence to leverage Digital and our Data, as fundamental enablers, to facilitate faster, better decisions and improved Defence outcomes,” burbled the paper’s introduction, under the optimistic heading of “purpose”.

Big government IT has long been a plaything for ambitious managers looking to make a name for themselves on the way up the greasy pole.

The document’s authors said the MoD’s “technology core is too fragmented, fragile, insecure and obsolescent” for modern-day usage, along with data being locked inside “internal and contractual silos” making it “hard to access and integrate”.

With the MoD being responsible for the new National Cyber Force and Britain’s burgeoning space agency, an IT refresh is probably no bad thing.

“The current lack of end to end visibility, poor awareness of what is in place and an inability to apply controls presents a huge risk and is not an acceptable position. We are compromised with respect to security, operational integrity, functionality and speed.”

Chief among the paper’s various new flashy Things of the Future is the creation of a Digital Backbone, described as cloud-based and embodying “common standards and architecture”.

The paper’s authors appear to understand the scale of the challenge they’ve set themselves, writing: “The core technical building blocks are the networks, gateways, hosting services, user interfaces (including identity management and access mechanisms) and middleware that come together to deliver data and information wherever and however we need to exploit it”.

Despite the evident state of internal MoD networks, however, there is one great big elephant in the room: who’s going to pay for it? Funding all the flashy headline-grabbing cyber stuff tore a hole in the ministry’s for the next decade, according to the National Audit Office earlier this year. Meanwhile, the Army has squandered billions trying and failing to buy new armoured vehicles, while the Navy has absorbed yet more billions for the two new aircraft carriers and supporting ships.

Ominously, the new Digital Strategy for Defence document didn't mention the word “budget” once – but did say the MoD will be treating data as “the mineral ore that fuels integration and enables a system-of-systems approach”. This ore will be mined by a Digital Foundry (er, are you sure they meant to say this? Ed.) that will “unleash the power of Defence’s Data,” presumably by adding random capital letters to nouns.

Less prosaically, the MoD’s digital strategy boutique reckoned individual services are going to pay for all of this through “top-level budgetholder [TLB] equipment programmes.” Whether top commanders will be prepared to divert funds from pet projects into a central IT system remains to be seen.

Whatever the outcome of the jargon-laden document, it makes a change from “data is the new oil” and hackneyed old marketing spiel about data lakes. The full thing can be read on the MoD website as a 41-page PDF. ®


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Though pop culture might have reached peak zombie almost a decade ago, Oregon-based Bend Studio still managed to walk away with a decent game in the 2019 PlayStation 4 "exclusive" Days Gone. We say "exclusive" because we've been playing the PC port, which came out on 18 May. This follows a recent trend of titles made specifically for Sony's last-gen console being re-released for PC a couple of years later including Death Stranding and Horizon Zero Dawn.

Yes, the world stopped giving a toss after the eleventy-first season of AMC's flagging comic book adaptation The Walking Dead, but somehow surviving a zombie apocalypse remains a gripping setting for many – yours truly included. Even if it's one of the most done-to-death concepts under the sun, Bend has done a fantastic job of rendering an Oregon scorched by a mysterious viral epidemic that has turned 99 per cent of the population into rabid, shambling cannibals.

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Apple and its security contractor Security Industry Specialists (SIS) were sued on Friday in Massachusetts as part of a multijurisdictional defamation and malicious prosecution complaint brought on behalf of Ousmane Bah, a New York resident misidentified as a shoplifter multiple times in 2018 and 2019.

The lawsuit contends that Apple and SIS exhibited reckless disregard for the truth by misidentifying Bah as the perpetrator of multiple shoplifting crimes at iStores, leading to his unjustified arrest and to his defamation.

The filing [PDF] in US District Court in Massachusetts aims to revive charges relevant to events in Boston that were excluded from related ongoing litigation in New York. A third related case is being heard in New Jersey.

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On Thursday, Judge Andrew Cheng of the Superior Court of California in San Francisco, said [PDF] the plaintiffs – Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, Kelli Wisuri, and Heidi Lamar – can not only proceed against Google but also can represent more than 10,800 women who may have also been unfairly paid less than their male colleagues at the internet titan.

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The astonishing security blunder was revealed by investigative journalism website Bellingcat, which described what it found after “simply searching online for terms publicly known to be associated with nuclear weapons.”

The flashcards “detail intricate security details and protocols such as the positions of cameras, the frequency of patrols around the vaults, secret duress words that signal when a guard is being threatened and the unique identifiers that a restricted area badge needs to have,” Bellingcat reported.

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Trappit’s sueball against American Express Europe was partially run out by Mr Justice Snowden earlier this month, after the judge concluded that an ongoing parallel case in Spain meant the High Court did not have jurisdiction to hear claims brought by Trappit’s Panamanian branch in London.

A significant part of the complex and storied case will be heard, however, because Trappit’s Spanish subsidiary survived Amex’s attempt to have the entire case thrown out. The case alleges that Amex copied Trappit’s flight booking software after getting a peek at its functionality under NDA.

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Google is promising to capture data logs from Oracle and other on-prem SQL data systems for monitoring, data integration and ML pipelines.

Among the Chocolate Factory’s latest concoctions is Datastream, designed as a new serverless service to catch changes in data and replicate data where desirable.

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HTTP/2 200 date: Sat, 29 May 2021 14:00:14 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/5ee34de0ca2a5db3b427362aef802ee2cf1ed86c/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/b217c1cda3c68554b700cd6f1a8f0437c49ecaa4/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/b217c1cda3c68554b700cd6f1a8f0437c49ecaa4/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Sat, 29 May 2021 14:00:14 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 0a5a05fa5c0000da5231944000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 65703f7098e6da52-SYD MoD: Our networks are in 'unacceptable' state and both data and IT bods are stuck in silos • The Register

So if the generals would lend us a few bob to fix it that'd be nice of them


The Ministry of Defence’s IT systems are “too fragmented, fragile, insecure and obsolescent” and its operators are “mired in industrial age processes and culture,” according to a new digital strategy document.

Published earlier this week, the Digital Strategy for Defence paper is full of the usual MoD management-speak while not once mentioning the word “budget”, raising immediate questions about how the latest glitzy vision of the future would be paid for.

The strategy boutique’s latest output replaced two separate digital strategy and doctrine publications issued in late 2019, and defence procurement minister Jeremy Quin MP noted the “bewildering rate” at which digital technology is upending the staid old Ministry of Defence.

“This Digital Strategy outlines the step-change in approach that is required for Defence to leverage Digital and our Data, as fundamental enablers, to facilitate faster, better decisions and improved Defence outcomes,” burbled the paper’s introduction, under the optimistic heading of “purpose”.

Big government IT has long been a plaything for ambitious managers looking to make a name for themselves on the way up the greasy pole.

The document’s authors said the MoD’s “technology core is too fragmented, fragile, insecure and obsolescent” for modern-day usage, along with data being locked inside “internal and contractual silos” making it “hard to access and integrate”.

With the MoD being responsible for the new National Cyber Force and Britain’s burgeoning space agency, an IT refresh is probably no bad thing.

“The current lack of end to end visibility, poor awareness of what is in place and an inability to apply controls presents a huge risk and is not an acceptable position. We are compromised with respect to security, operational integrity, functionality and speed.”

Chief among the paper’s various new flashy Things of the Future is the creation of a Digital Backbone, described as cloud-based and embodying “common standards and architecture”.

The paper’s authors appear to understand the scale of the challenge they’ve set themselves, writing: “The core technical building blocks are the networks, gateways, hosting services, user interfaces (including identity management and access mechanisms) and middleware that come together to deliver data and information wherever and however we need to exploit it”.

Despite the evident state of internal MoD networks, however, there is one great big elephant in the room: who’s going to pay for it? Funding all the flashy headline-grabbing cyber stuff tore a hole in the ministry’s for the next decade, according to the National Audit Office earlier this year. Meanwhile, the Army has squandered billions trying and failing to buy new armoured vehicles, while the Navy has absorbed yet more billions for the two new aircraft carriers and supporting ships.

Ominously, the new Digital Strategy for Defence document didn't mention the word “budget” once – but did say the MoD will be treating data as “the mineral ore that fuels integration and enables a system-of-systems approach”. This ore will be mined by a Digital Foundry (er, are you sure they meant to say this? Ed.) that will “unleash the power of Defence’s Data,” presumably by adding random capital letters to nouns.

Less prosaically, the MoD’s digital strategy boutique reckoned individual services are going to pay for all of this through “top-level budgetholder [TLB] equipment programmes.” Whether top commanders will be prepared to divert funds from pet projects into a central IT system remains to be seen.

Whatever the outcome of the jargon-laden document, it makes a change from “data is the new oil” and hackneyed old marketing spiel about data lakes. The full thing can be read on the MoD website as a 41-page PDF. ®


Other stories you might like

The RPGGreetings, traveller, and welcome back to The Register Plays Games, our monthly gaming column. In May, the industry finally pushed some hot properties out the door including Resident Evil Village, Biomutant, and the Mass Effect remasters. But we opted to check out something just a little bit older.

Though pop culture might have reached peak zombie almost a decade ago, Oregon-based Bend Studio still managed to walk away with a decent game in the 2019 PlayStation 4 "exclusive" Days Gone. We say "exclusive" because we've been playing the PC port, which came out on 18 May. This follows a recent trend of titles made specifically for Sony's last-gen console being re-released for PC a couple of years later including Death Stranding and Horizon Zero Dawn.

Yes, the world stopped giving a toss after the eleventy-first season of AMC's flagging comic book adaptation The Walking Dead, but somehow surviving a zombie apocalypse remains a gripping setting for many – yours truly included. Even if it's one of the most done-to-death concepts under the sun, Bend has done a fantastic job of rendering an Oregon scorched by a mysterious viral epidemic that has turned 99 per cent of the population into rabid, shambling cannibals.

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The lawsuit contends that Apple and SIS exhibited reckless disregard for the truth by misidentifying Bah as the perpetrator of multiple shoplifting crimes at iStores, leading to his unjustified arrest and to his defamation.

The filing [PDF] in US District Court in Massachusetts aims to revive charges relevant to events in Boston that were excluded from related ongoing litigation in New York. A third related case is being heard in New Jersey.

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On Thursday, Judge Andrew Cheng of the Superior Court of California in San Francisco, said [PDF] the plaintiffs – Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, Kelli Wisuri, and Heidi Lamar – can not only proceed against Google but also can represent more than 10,800 women who may have also been unfairly paid less than their male colleagues at the internet titan.

Their complaint was filed in 2017, seeking damages from Google that could now balloon to $600m given its status. The women argued Google had violated the California Equal Pay Act, and failed to pay them their full wages after they quit or were dismissed.

Continue readingBig Tech has a big problem with Florida passing a law that protects politicians from web moderation Disney and Comcast get a pass from the Sunshine State, though

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The law, which contains an exemption for theme park operators so as not to inconvenience two politically influential companies operating in the state – The Walt Disney Company and the Universal Studios owner Comcast – was promptly excoriated by US Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) as unconstitutional.

Continue readingUS nuclear weapon bunker security secrets spill from online flashcards since 2013 Leaked data proves very educational

Details of some US nuclear missile bunkers in Europe, which contain live warheads, along with secret codewords used by guards to signal that they’re being threatened by enemies, were exposed for nearly a decade through online flashcards used for education, but which were left publicly available.

The astonishing security blunder was revealed by investigative journalism website Bellingcat, which described what it found after “simply searching online for terms publicly known to be associated with nuclear weapons.”

The flashcards “detail intricate security details and protocols such as the positions of cameras, the frequency of patrols around the vaults, secret duress words that signal when a guard is being threatened and the unique identifiers that a restricted area badge needs to have,” Bellingcat reported.

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Trappit’s sueball against American Express Europe was partially run out by Mr Justice Snowden earlier this month, after the judge concluded that an ongoing parallel case in Spain meant the High Court did not have jurisdiction to hear claims brought by Trappit’s Panamanian branch in London.

A significant part of the complex and storied case will be heard, however, because Trappit’s Spanish subsidiary survived Amex’s attempt to have the entire case thrown out. The case alleges that Amex copied Trappit’s flight booking software after getting a peek at its functionality under NDA.

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Among the Chocolate Factory’s latest concoctions is Datastream, designed as a new serverless service to catch changes in data and replicate data where desirable.

Gerrit Kazmaier, the general manager and vice president for databases, data analytics and Looker at Google told The Register the system works “directly with the logical database logs” to understand the state of the data, inserts, deletes and updates.

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The SaaSy CRM firm’s CEO Marc Benioff “couldn't be more excited” to tell the world the legendary event will go ahead in 2021 with real people, lanyards around necks, standing around conference buffet tables contemplating reheated meat of no discernible provenance.

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The pipe layer committed to connect over 6.2 million homes and businesses in rural and semi-rural locations to its gigabit-capable full-fibre network.

Openreach had originally planned to upgrade just 3.2 million rural premises by the mid-to-late 2020s. The previous plans targeted around 250 areas Ofcom had deemed to be underserved by fixed-line providers.

Continue readingFormer IT manager from Essex pleads guilty to defrauding the NHS of £800k Invoices from his own companies were just less than the amount he was able to sign off. Services never delivered

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Barry David Stannard, a 53-year-old from Chelmsford, Essex, admitted to four offences at Chelmsford Crown Court, including two charges of fraud by false representation and two charges of cheating the public revenue.

The NHS Counter Fraud Authority found that when head of unified communications Mid Essex Hospital Trust, Stannard submitted a "nil return" declaration of interests forms to the trust, but an investigation confirmed he was actually the director of two companies that had received a large amount of money from 2012 to 2019.

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The retro computing craze spiked during the pandemic. With the usual watering holes closed, some techies occupied their time by painstakingly restoring the old Performa towers cluttering their lofts.

And, as one of our readers pointed out, Apple has seemingly jumped on the bandwagon by selling the nearly eight-year-old “trashcan” Mac Pro. In true Cupertino fashion, it doesn't come cheap, despite its December 2013 vintage.

A model with a 2.7 GHz 12-core Intel Xeon E5 processor, combined with 64 GB of DDR3 RAM, 1TB of PCIe storage, and two AMD FirePro D700 GPUs with 6GB of GDDR5 VRAM costs a cool £5,149.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3i6VNdx