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Huawei revenue dips 16 per cent to $23.5bn. Bosses aren't worried because decline was a matter of (selling smartphone brand) Honor
Thursday, 29 April 2021 13:57

HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:00:07 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:00:07 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 09bf8717c30000fe6c95209000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 64790e060dccfe6c-SYD Huawei revenue dips 16 per cent to $23.5bn. Bosses aren't worried because decline was a matter of (selling smartphone brand) Honor • The Register

$600m in patent royalty payments pour in to help margins pop


Huawei has posted its Q1 2021 results – and the headline figure is a 16.5 per cent year-on-year revenue drop to CNY152.2bn ($23.5bn).

The Chinese comms equipment giant nonetheless characterized its business as “resilient,” and pointed to the sale of the mid-range smartphone brand Honor as a reason its consumer business dipped, while its network business continued to grow.

Huawei is not a public company and so it doesn’t disclose much about its finances. Markets were told its net profit margin rose 3.8 percentage points year-on-year to reach 11.1 per cent, thanks to “ongoing efforts to improve quality of operations and management efficiency.” A $600m wedge of patent revenue helped, too.

Honor 10

Huawei sells low-end Honor handset business due to 'tremendous pressure' in supply chain

READ MORE

Rotating chairman* Eric Xu nodded to the company’s geopolitical challenges in a canned statement, adding that the electronics giant remains “committed to technological innovation and investing heavily in R&D as we work to address supply continuity challenges caused by restrictions in the market.

"We will continue making breakthroughs in basic science and pushing the frontiers of technology."

Perhaps a little more investment in security could be worth consideration, too, considering a newly disclosed bug that allows attackers to knock out Huawei’s ManageOne unified data centre management suite. This bug is a mere 4.7 on the ten-point CVSSv3 vulnerability-rating scale. ®

*Huawei has three chairpersons. Each has a six-month stint in the big chair, then steps aside for a year.


Apple is having one helluva pandemic. The world's most valuable tech brand last night reported stellar numbers for its Q2 of fiscal 2021 [PDF] ended 27 March, with revenue up 53 per cent to $89.584bn and profit more than doubling.

Give or take a billion or three, Apple made almost as much profit in the quarter – $23.63bn versus $11.249bn a year earlier – as some tech "giants" reported in sales for the whole of 2020. HPE springs to mind.

Every product division swelled in size, including the biggest: iPhones sales jumped 65 per cent year-on-year to $47.938bn. CEO Tim Cook said this was helped by the delayed launch of the iPhone 12, which came out in the quarter as opposed to the usual autumn timeframe.

Continue readingMayday! Mayday! Microsoft has settled on a build and Windows 10 21H1 is inbound Makes good on its promise to inflict News and Interests on older versions

Buckle up, it's that time again. Microsoft is set to unleash Windows 10 21H1 upon an expectant world, as well as inflict its weird obsession with News and Interests on existing users.

"We believe," said Windows Insider bigwig Brandon LeBlanc, "that Build 19043.928 is the final build for the May 2021 Update."

Microsoft being Microsoft, the company has sent out a number of patch releases since the 13 April debut of that build. So, should that end up being the version emitted (probably in May), users can likely look forward to some insta-patching being needed.

Continue readingVivaldi update unleashes the 'Cookie Crumbler' to simply block any services asking for consent (sites may break) Plus: Browser sends Google's FLoC straight to the blacklist

The latest release of Chromium-based browser Vivaldi has extended ad blocking to handle cookie warning dialogs and sent a shot across the bows of Google's ad technology, FLoC.

That first bit will appeal to anyone tired of the cookie dialogs and banners that have popped up in websites as a result of regulation. While the aim of the questions is noble, for users it can be annoying and can leave them preferring to hit the Accept All button rather than wading through what can sometimes be pages of options to turn off every setting.

Vivaldi's take is to add cookie warnings to its ad blocking sources. Once enabled, the "Cookie Crumbler" simply blocks the service asking for consent or hides the dialog.

Continue readingBillions in data protection lawsuits rides on Google's last-ditch UK Supreme Court defence for Safari Workaround sueball Biggest data protection case for years teeters on brink

Google has urged the UK's Supreme Court to throw out a £3bn lawsuit brought by an ex-Which director over secretly planted tracking cookies on devices running Safari, on the grounds that local law doesn’t allow for opt-out class action lawsuits.

The case, being heard over two days this week in the Supreme Court, the final court of appeal in Britain for civil cases, has huge implications for legal businesses and investors as well as data protection law. At stake is a previous Court of Appeal ruling, as well as up to £3bn for a venture capital fund backing former Which man Richard Lloyd's case.

Lloyd fronts a campaign called Google You Owe Us. He seeks somewhere between £1.5bn and £3bn from Google in damages for breach of statutory duty – but before that can be argued about, he needs legal permission to serve the case on Google LLC in the US.

Continue readingMajor shift in smartphone market sees Chinese kit win the middle while Apple and Samsung skim the cream Many owe thanks to Huawei ducking out under what IDC calls 'increased weight of US sanctions’

People are buying smartphones again, according to figures from analyst IDC which show the market grew 25 per cent year-on-year in Q1 2021.

This translates to 346 million devices, with the strongest growth coming out of China (30 per cent) and Asia Pacific (28 per cent).

IDC research director Nabila Popal said:

Continue reading48 ways you can avoid file-scrambling, data-stealing miscreants – or so says the Ransomware Task Force No, not the US government's task force ... the other one

The Institute for Security and Technology's Ransomware Task Force (RTF) on Thursday published an 81-page report presenting policy makers with 48 recommendations to disrupt the ransomware business and mitigate the effect of such attacks.

The RTF, formed last December and populated by representatives from companies like Microsoft, Palo Alto Networks, and Rapid7, and government organizations like the FBI and US Secret Service, has nothing to do with the RDETF, or Ransomware and Digital Extortion Task Force, assembled last week under the auspices of the Justice Department. However, the RTF and RDETF can be expected to cross-pollinate one another.

The report, provided in advance of publication to The Register and due to appear here, attempts to provide guidance for dealing with the alarmingly popular scourge of ransomware, which generally involves miscreants who obtain access to poorly secured systems and steal or encrypt system data, thereafter offering to restore it or keep quiet about the whole thing in exchange for a substantial payment.

Continue readingBig Tech bankrolling AI ethics research and events seems very familiar. Ah, yes, Big Tobacco all over again Who knows whether algorithms really harm society?

Analysis Big tech's approach to avoiding AI regulation looks a lot like Big Tobacco's campaign to shape smoking rules, according to academics who say machine-learning ethics standards need to be developed outside of the influence of corporate sponsors.

In a paper included in the Proceedings of the 2021 AAAI/ACM Conference on AI, Ethics, and Society (AIES ’21) next month, Mohamed Abdalla, a doctoral student in computer science at the University of Toronto, and Moustafa Abdalla, a doctoral student on deferral from Harvard Medical School, explore how Big Tech has adopted strategies similar to those used by Big Tobacco.

The analogy "is not perfect," the two brothers acknowledge, but is intended to provide a historical touchstone and "to leverage the negative gut reaction to Big Tobacco’s funding of academia to enable a more critical examination of Big Tech." The comparison is also not an assertion that Big Tech is deliberately buying off researchers; rather, the researchers argue that "industry funding warps academia regardless of intentionality due to perverse incentives."

Continue readingMicrosoft demotes Calibri from default typeface gig, starts fling with five other fonts None of them are Comic Sans, or likely to provoke similar passion

Microsoft has decided that Calibri’s days as its default font are numbered.

“We believe it’s time to evolve,” says a post by Microsoft’s design team, which reckons it’s time for a change because: “A default font is often the first impression we make; it’s the visual identity we present to other people via our resumes, documents, or emails. And just as people and the world around us age and grow, so too should our modes of expression.”

With Q3 revenue of $41bn and net income of $15.5bn Microsoft seems to be making a perfectly good impression on the world. Or perhaps that colossal pile of cash means you don’t have to explain why you’ve commissioned five typefaces to replace one that has no obvious flaws.

Continue readingChina launches first module of new, crewed, Tiangong-3 space station Expected to host three astronauts for a decade, starting in 2022

China has placed the first module of a crewed space station in orbit.

Launched atop a Long March 5B rocket at around 03:30 AM UTC on Thursday, the “Tianhe” module is 16.6 meters long, 4.2 meters in diameter at its largest point, and weighed 22.5 tonnes on Earth. It is the largest spacecraft developed by China.

Tianhe includes living quarters and life support kit capable of sustaining three taikonauts, plus a dock for incoming spacecraft and the two other station modules China will launch later this year. Those modules will be joined at right angles, giving the habitable sections of the station a T-shape.

Continue readingOh no it isn't... Oh yes it is... Microsoft confirms OneDrive lives on under Windows 7 Panto season comes early in Redmond as TLS tweaks revive software

Is the OneDrive desktop sync client supported under Windows 7? Despite evidence to the contrary, it appears so.

It's been a few weeks since the issue first reared its ugly head, but Microsoft has finally confirmed to The Register that even though Windows 7 itself is very much out of normal support nowadays, customers hanging on to the venerable OS should still be able to do the file fandango with the Windows 7 OneDrive client.

A spokesperson told us: "Microsoft continues to support OneDrive on Windows 7," so we'd suggest waving this bit of text around if, like our reader Matt, you get told otherwise by helpful support staff.

Continue readingGood: Water vapor signal detected for first time on distant planet. Bad: Er, we'll let one of the boffins explain Hey, look, it's the galaxy's Florida

Evidence of what was once possibly water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere in a distant world for the first time – though one of the scientists involved in the discovery told us this would-be interstellar getaway is "completely inhospitable."

Wasp-33b, spotted in 2015, is a hot and huge Jupiter-ish gas giant. Located about 400 light-years from us, its orbit is so small that a single year on this alien world lasts a little over 24 Earth hours. The short distance between itself and its sun, HD 15082, means that it bears the brunt of the star's heat.

“The atmosphere is already over 2,000 degrees Celsius, as it is so close to its host star – a distance that would place it well within the orbit of Mercury to our Sun,” said physics assistant professor Neale Gibson, co-author of a paper published (preprint) in The Astrophysical Journal Letters detailing Wasp-33b.

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:00:07 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/98eb914b882d8b4f23fb01bfc6f7cd3270837c3b/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:00:07 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy03us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 09bf8717c30000fe6c95209000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 64790e060dccfe6c-SYD Huawei revenue dips 16 per cent to $23.5bn. Bosses aren't worried because decline was a matter of (selling smartphone brand) Honor • The Register

$600m in patent royalty payments pour in to help margins pop


Huawei has posted its Q1 2021 results – and the headline figure is a 16.5 per cent year-on-year revenue drop to CNY152.2bn ($23.5bn).

The Chinese comms equipment giant nonetheless characterized its business as “resilient,” and pointed to the sale of the mid-range smartphone brand Honor as a reason its consumer business dipped, while its network business continued to grow.

Huawei is not a public company and so it doesn’t disclose much about its finances. Markets were told its net profit margin rose 3.8 percentage points year-on-year to reach 11.1 per cent, thanks to “ongoing efforts to improve quality of operations and management efficiency.” A $600m wedge of patent revenue helped, too.

Honor 10

Huawei sells low-end Honor handset business due to 'tremendous pressure' in supply chain

READ MORE

Rotating chairman* Eric Xu nodded to the company’s geopolitical challenges in a canned statement, adding that the electronics giant remains “committed to technological innovation and investing heavily in R&D as we work to address supply continuity challenges caused by restrictions in the market.

"We will continue making breakthroughs in basic science and pushing the frontiers of technology."

Perhaps a little more investment in security could be worth consideration, too, considering a newly disclosed bug that allows attackers to knock out Huawei’s ManageOne unified data centre management suite. This bug is a mere 4.7 on the ten-point CVSSv3 vulnerability-rating scale. ®

*Huawei has three chairpersons. Each has a six-month stint in the big chair, then steps aside for a year.


Apple is having one helluva pandemic. The world's most valuable tech brand last night reported stellar numbers for its Q2 of fiscal 2021 [PDF] ended 27 March, with revenue up 53 per cent to $89.584bn and profit more than doubling.

Give or take a billion or three, Apple made almost as much profit in the quarter – $23.63bn versus $11.249bn a year earlier – as some tech "giants" reported in sales for the whole of 2020. HPE springs to mind.

Every product division swelled in size, including the biggest: iPhones sales jumped 65 per cent year-on-year to $47.938bn. CEO Tim Cook said this was helped by the delayed launch of the iPhone 12, which came out in the quarter as opposed to the usual autumn timeframe.

Continue readingMayday! Mayday! Microsoft has settled on a build and Windows 10 21H1 is inbound Makes good on its promise to inflict News and Interests on older versions

Buckle up, it's that time again. Microsoft is set to unleash Windows 10 21H1 upon an expectant world, as well as inflict its weird obsession with News and Interests on existing users.

"We believe," said Windows Insider bigwig Brandon LeBlanc, "that Build 19043.928 is the final build for the May 2021 Update."

Microsoft being Microsoft, the company has sent out a number of patch releases since the 13 April debut of that build. So, should that end up being the version emitted (probably in May), users can likely look forward to some insta-patching being needed.

Continue readingVivaldi update unleashes the 'Cookie Crumbler' to simply block any services asking for consent (sites may break) Plus: Browser sends Google's FLoC straight to the blacklist

The latest release of Chromium-based browser Vivaldi has extended ad blocking to handle cookie warning dialogs and sent a shot across the bows of Google's ad technology, FLoC.

That first bit will appeal to anyone tired of the cookie dialogs and banners that have popped up in websites as a result of regulation. While the aim of the questions is noble, for users it can be annoying and can leave them preferring to hit the Accept All button rather than wading through what can sometimes be pages of options to turn off every setting.

Vivaldi's take is to add cookie warnings to its ad blocking sources. Once enabled, the "Cookie Crumbler" simply blocks the service asking for consent or hides the dialog.

Continue readingBillions in data protection lawsuits rides on Google's last-ditch UK Supreme Court defence for Safari Workaround sueball Biggest data protection case for years teeters on brink

Google has urged the UK's Supreme Court to throw out a £3bn lawsuit brought by an ex-Which director over secretly planted tracking cookies on devices running Safari, on the grounds that local law doesn’t allow for opt-out class action lawsuits.

The case, being heard over two days this week in the Supreme Court, the final court of appeal in Britain for civil cases, has huge implications for legal businesses and investors as well as data protection law. At stake is a previous Court of Appeal ruling, as well as up to £3bn for a venture capital fund backing former Which man Richard Lloyd's case.

Lloyd fronts a campaign called Google You Owe Us. He seeks somewhere between £1.5bn and £3bn from Google in damages for breach of statutory duty – but before that can be argued about, he needs legal permission to serve the case on Google LLC in the US.

Continue readingMajor shift in smartphone market sees Chinese kit win the middle while Apple and Samsung skim the cream Many owe thanks to Huawei ducking out under what IDC calls 'increased weight of US sanctions’

People are buying smartphones again, according to figures from analyst IDC which show the market grew 25 per cent year-on-year in Q1 2021.

This translates to 346 million devices, with the strongest growth coming out of China (30 per cent) and Asia Pacific (28 per cent).

IDC research director Nabila Popal said:

Continue reading48 ways you can avoid file-scrambling, data-stealing miscreants – or so says the Ransomware Task Force No, not the US government's task force ... the other one

The Institute for Security and Technology's Ransomware Task Force (RTF) on Thursday published an 81-page report presenting policy makers with 48 recommendations to disrupt the ransomware business and mitigate the effect of such attacks.

The RTF, formed last December and populated by representatives from companies like Microsoft, Palo Alto Networks, and Rapid7, and government organizations like the FBI and US Secret Service, has nothing to do with the RDETF, or Ransomware and Digital Extortion Task Force, assembled last week under the auspices of the Justice Department. However, the RTF and RDETF can be expected to cross-pollinate one another.

The report, provided in advance of publication to The Register and due to appear here, attempts to provide guidance for dealing with the alarmingly popular scourge of ransomware, which generally involves miscreants who obtain access to poorly secured systems and steal or encrypt system data, thereafter offering to restore it or keep quiet about the whole thing in exchange for a substantial payment.

Continue readingBig Tech bankrolling AI ethics research and events seems very familiar. Ah, yes, Big Tobacco all over again Who knows whether algorithms really harm society?

Analysis Big tech's approach to avoiding AI regulation looks a lot like Big Tobacco's campaign to shape smoking rules, according to academics who say machine-learning ethics standards need to be developed outside of the influence of corporate sponsors.

In a paper included in the Proceedings of the 2021 AAAI/ACM Conference on AI, Ethics, and Society (AIES ’21) next month, Mohamed Abdalla, a doctoral student in computer science at the University of Toronto, and Moustafa Abdalla, a doctoral student on deferral from Harvard Medical School, explore how Big Tech has adopted strategies similar to those used by Big Tobacco.

The analogy "is not perfect," the two brothers acknowledge, but is intended to provide a historical touchstone and "to leverage the negative gut reaction to Big Tobacco’s funding of academia to enable a more critical examination of Big Tech." The comparison is also not an assertion that Big Tech is deliberately buying off researchers; rather, the researchers argue that "industry funding warps academia regardless of intentionality due to perverse incentives."

Continue readingMicrosoft demotes Calibri from default typeface gig, starts fling with five other fonts None of them are Comic Sans, or likely to provoke similar passion

Microsoft has decided that Calibri’s days as its default font are numbered.

“We believe it’s time to evolve,” says a post by Microsoft’s design team, which reckons it’s time for a change because: “A default font is often the first impression we make; it’s the visual identity we present to other people via our resumes, documents, or emails. And just as people and the world around us age and grow, so too should our modes of expression.”

With Q3 revenue of $41bn and net income of $15.5bn Microsoft seems to be making a perfectly good impression on the world. Or perhaps that colossal pile of cash means you don’t have to explain why you’ve commissioned five typefaces to replace one that has no obvious flaws.

Continue readingChina launches first module of new, crewed, Tiangong-3 space station Expected to host three astronauts for a decade, starting in 2022

China has placed the first module of a crewed space station in orbit.

Launched atop a Long March 5B rocket at around 03:30 AM UTC on Thursday, the “Tianhe” module is 16.6 meters long, 4.2 meters in diameter at its largest point, and weighed 22.5 tonnes on Earth. It is the largest spacecraft developed by China.

Tianhe includes living quarters and life support kit capable of sustaining three taikonauts, plus a dock for incoming spacecraft and the two other station modules China will launch later this year. Those modules will be joined at right angles, giving the habitable sections of the station a T-shape.

Continue readingOh no it isn't... Oh yes it is... Microsoft confirms OneDrive lives on under Windows 7 Panto season comes early in Redmond as TLS tweaks revive software

Is the OneDrive desktop sync client supported under Windows 7? Despite evidence to the contrary, it appears so.

It's been a few weeks since the issue first reared its ugly head, but Microsoft has finally confirmed to The Register that even though Windows 7 itself is very much out of normal support nowadays, customers hanging on to the venerable OS should still be able to do the file fandango with the Windows 7 OneDrive client.

A spokesperson told us: "Microsoft continues to support OneDrive on Windows 7," so we'd suggest waving this bit of text around if, like our reader Matt, you get told otherwise by helpful support staff.

Continue readingGood: Water vapor signal detected for first time on distant planet. Bad: Er, we'll let one of the boffins explain Hey, look, it's the galaxy's Florida

Evidence of what was once possibly water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere in a distant world for the first time – though one of the scientists involved in the discovery told us this would-be interstellar getaway is "completely inhospitable."

Wasp-33b, spotted in 2015, is a hot and huge Jupiter-ish gas giant. Located about 400 light-years from us, its orbit is so small that a single year on this alien world lasts a little over 24 Earth hours. The short distance between itself and its sun, HD 15082, means that it bears the brunt of the star's heat.

“The atmosphere is already over 2,000 degrees Celsius, as it is so close to its host star – a distance that would place it well within the orbit of Mercury to our Sun,” said physics assistant professor Neale Gibson, co-author of a paper published (preprint) in The Astrophysical Journal Letters detailing Wasp-33b.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/2QHAVOD