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China claims it has stolen a march on 6G with colossal patent portfolio
Tuesday, 27 April 2021 12:58

HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 02:00:11 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/c57aac32a05aff93a9236f59797a78e1924fa10f/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/6338f70b64cd85296a8d02fa2becd0a308b7a855/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/6338f70b64cd85296a8d02fa2becd0a308b7a855/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 02:00:11 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 09b7cd9b660000fe80df8ae000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 646cb20bda53fe80-SYD China claims it has stolen a march on 6G with colossal patent portfolio • The Register

The standard is nascent and won’t land for almost a decade. But the jockeying for position is already fierce


China's State Intellectual Property Office has proclaimed the nation already dominates the world in development of patents pertinent to sixth-generation mobile networks.

The Office (CNIPA) chose World Intellectual Property Day (April 26th) to assert China’s 6G dominance, telling state-controlled media that its analysis of patent applications relevant to the next-gen standard found 38,000 relevant pieces of work of which 35 percent come from China.

CNIPA noted that Finland, the USA, South Korea, and Japan are all pursuing 6G, but that China has spotted the significance of the next gen tech, invested accordingly and already has the fruits of local innovators' labour to show for their efforts.

State media reports point out that while China currently dominates patent applications for some aspects of 6G, notably terahertz networking and AI-infused air interfaces, other nations are ahead in other 6G technologies. Cue lots of familiar "let's get the national shoulder to the wheel" rhetoric about the need for Chinese enterprises, academics, and other stakeholders to make sure China is a player in the new standard.

Stars and Stripes zeroes and ones

United States' plan to beat China includes dominating tech standards groups – especially for 5G

READ MORE

That call to arms may matter more than the patents of which China is so proud. The world has well and truly woken up to China's increasingly assertive presence on standards bodies and wants that to change, because involving local businesses in the standards process helps them get to market faster as Huawei did with 5G.

The Biden administration has a policy of dominating standards-setting processes, an idea UK spookhaüs GCHQ last week backed enthusiastically.

China's pride in its patent portfolio may also be premature: while consortia have already formed to define 6G, and bodies like the GSM Association and International Telecommunications Union have started talking about it, a formal standard is not expected to emerge until late in the 2020s. ®


China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has defined type of silicon companies it is willing to offer tax credits – and even small outfits are invited to apply if they have some patents in their pockets.

The tax relief is part of a group of measures snappily titled "Several Policies to Promote the High-quality Development of the Integrated Circuit Industry and Software Industry in the New Era."

The credits will be offered to companies pulling in more than 10 to 20 million yuan (US$1.5m to $3m) sales revenue in a year, depending on what they are selling.

Continue readingIt doesn't really matter how many of us gripe about Google, nothing can stop it printing billions of dollars Profit, sales soar as giant seemingly scales beyond our perception of reality and scrutiny of society

Google-parent Alphabet generated $55.3bn in the first three months of 2021, a 34 per cent increase from the year-ago quarter that exceeded financial analysts' expectations and lifted company shares in after-hours trading today.

Net income from Q1 more than doubled, rising from $6.8bn a year ago to $17.9bn, putting earnings per share (EPS) at $26.29.

Wall Street analysts on average had been looking for revenue and EPS more along the lines of $51.68bn and $15.88 respectively. Alphabet's earnings beat added about 4.5 per cent to its share price once the earnings report was released, a move magnified perhaps by the announcement of a $50bn stock repurchase plan.

Continue readingHow HPC should mean high performance storage, too Big data shouldn’t mean slow answers

Sponsored When you’re asking big questions, you really don’t want to have to trade off accuracy and insight for speed.

In bioinformatics or pharmaceuticals research, the ability to sequence a genome in hours as opposed to weeks or months can dramatically accelerate innovation when it comes to spotting new disease variants or developing new vaccines or other treatments.

The development and training of self-driving vehicles generates vast amounts of data – in the region of 64TB per vehicle per day – which must be rapidly aggregated and prepped before it can be fed into the AI models underpinning autonomous driving technology.

Continue readingFirst Coinbase, now Basecamp: Should workplaces ban political talk on internal corporate platforms? 'You shouldn't have to wonder if staying out of it means you're complicit, or wading into it means you're a target'

Poll Project management software maker Basecamp has come under fire for banning its employees from having “societal and political discussions” using their internal work accounts.

The Chicago-based outfit announced a number of changes to its workplace on Monday, including getting rid of peer-performance reviews, disbanding all committees, and cutting fitness and wellness benefits in exchange for a wedge of cash.

But the rule that has received the most backlash from its own staff and critics outside the business is the one that discourages workers talking about sensitive issues like politics openly at work. Specifically, staff were told to "refrain" from using the company's internal Basecamp deployment "to discuss societal politics at work effective immediately."

Continue readingState of Maine lays off 15 independent consultants on $13k a month amid efforts to implement troubled Workday system Vendor claims government failed to provide 'clear direction' for the project

The US State of Maine has laid off 15 independent IT contractors, each paid $13,000 a month, who were working on its paused project to implement a new Workday HR and finance system, which is at least two years late and millions of dollars over budget.

What exactly the contractors were doing during March is open to question since Workday suspended the project in February, owing to a contract dispute with the administration.

Nonetheless, those techies-for-hire got an average of $13,000 each, at a rate $108 per hour, according to Kirsten Figueroa, commissioner of the Maine Department of Administrative and Financial Services.

Continue readingDon't blame rural carriers for buying Huawei, says FCC Commissioner. They couldn't afford the top-shelf stuff Cites extremely nascent OpenRAN as country's great hope

Smaller carriers and networks are the weakest link in America’s telecommunications supply chain, FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks claimed while speaking at a supply chain integrity workshop.

“I’ve spoken to many rural wireless carriers about how they came to purchase Huawei and ZTE equipment in the first place. While they did so legally and in good faith, concerns about this equipment aren’t exactly new,” he said, noting a nearly decade-old bipartisan report from the House Intelligence Committee that urged carriers to avoid procuring kit from the two Chinese vendors.

Rural carriers bought this gear because of financial limitations. Unable to take advantage of the same bulk discounts enjoyed by larger outfits like AT&T and Verizon, and with a smaller user-base, the comparatively affordable kit offered by Huawei and ZTE looked more attractive as a result.

Continue readingHere's what Russia's SVR spy agency does when it breaks into your network, says US CISA infosec agency Email provider cock.li called out for harbouring snooping personas

Following attribution of the SolarWinds supply chain attack to Russia's APT29, the US CISA infosec agency has published a list of the spies' known tactics – including a penchant for using a naughtily named email provider.

APT29* is the Western infosec world's codename for what we now know is the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service, known by its Russian acronym SVR.

As well as publishing a list of things US counterintelligence know about their Russian offensive counterparts, CISA has also added some advice on how to avoid these common Russian intelligence compromise tactics.

Continue readingUK government resists pressure to hold statutory inquiry into Post Office Horizon scandal MPs unite behind call to hold those responsible to account, but minister says it would take too long

The UK government has resisted calls for statutory public inquiries into the Post Office Horizon scandal in which subpostmasters were wrongly prosecuted over accounting flaws in Fujitsu-built software.

Following last week's Court of Appeal ruling which quashed 39 convictions of Post Office employees, MPs today pressed the government to hold a full public inquiry into the matter.

Shadow minister for science, research and digital Chi Onwurah told MPs that the government's inquiry into the Horizon scandal, announced in September 2020 and to be led by former High Court judge Sir Wyn Williams, would be toothless and could even lead to a whitewash as postmasters had been clear that they would fail to recognise and participate in such an inquiry.

Continue readingShadow over Fedora 34 as maintainer of Java packages quits with some choice words for Red Hat and Eclipse But hey, the release looks OK

Fedora 34, a feature-packed new release of Red Hat's leading edge Linux distribution, was released today, though the main Java package maintainer has quit, urging "affected maintainers to drop dependencies on Java."

Fedora 34 is used by Red Hat to try out new features that are likely to end up in first CentOS Stream and then Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), the commercial offering.

What is new in Fedora 34? The full list of changes is here and includes:

Continue readingTerror of the adtech industry iOS 14.5 has landed, and Siri can answer your calls ... though she/he can't hang up Good news for users with disabilities, though there's room for improvement

Point releases typically come and go without much fanfare. By their very nature, they're incremental, bringing modest performance and security updates, and not much else. The latest version of Apple's mobile operating system, iOS 14.5, released yesterday, is different.

Why? Three words: App Tracking Transparency (ATT). First announced last year, ATT forces apps to disclose how they collect user data, and actively request the consent of end-users through a simple pop-up dialog box.

Apple has described this as a fundamental privacy feature, which will curb the excesses of some particularly data-hungry platforms.

Continue readingTraffic lights, who needs 'em? Lucky Kentucky residents up in arms over first roundabout Is it yield to the left or just ram my way through any which way?

From Swindon's insane five circles in a circle to the insurance-clause-generating12-lane monster around the Arc de Triomphe, the roundabout has been easing congestion helping local governments across Europe save their pennies for decades.

However, it really seems to be grinding gears in northeastern Kentucky, where denizens have seen their first one installed by state highway agency, KYTC.

The mini-roundabout, at the intersection of Routes 60 & 801, was originally a four-way stop, with 4,000 cars passing through it every day.

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 02:00:11 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/c57aac32a05aff93a9236f59797a78e1924fa10f/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/6338f70b64cd85296a8d02fa2becd0a308b7a855/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/6338f70b64cd85296a8d02fa2becd0a308b7a855/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 02:00:11 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 09b7cd9b660000fe80df8ae000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 646cb20bda53fe80-SYD China claims it has stolen a march on 6G with colossal patent portfolio • The Register

The standard is nascent and won’t land for almost a decade. But the jockeying for position is already fierce


China's State Intellectual Property Office has proclaimed the nation already dominates the world in development of patents pertinent to sixth-generation mobile networks.

The Office (CNIPA) chose World Intellectual Property Day (April 26th) to assert China’s 6G dominance, telling state-controlled media that its analysis of patent applications relevant to the next-gen standard found 38,000 relevant pieces of work of which 35 percent come from China.

CNIPA noted that Finland, the USA, South Korea, and Japan are all pursuing 6G, but that China has spotted the significance of the next gen tech, invested accordingly and already has the fruits of local innovators' labour to show for their efforts.

State media reports point out that while China currently dominates patent applications for some aspects of 6G, notably terahertz networking and AI-infused air interfaces, other nations are ahead in other 6G technologies. Cue lots of familiar "let's get the national shoulder to the wheel" rhetoric about the need for Chinese enterprises, academics, and other stakeholders to make sure China is a player in the new standard.

Stars and Stripes zeroes and ones

United States' plan to beat China includes dominating tech standards groups – especially for 5G

READ MORE

That call to arms may matter more than the patents of which China is so proud. The world has well and truly woken up to China's increasingly assertive presence on standards bodies and wants that to change, because involving local businesses in the standards process helps them get to market faster as Huawei did with 5G.

The Biden administration has a policy of dominating standards-setting processes, an idea UK spookhaüs GCHQ last week backed enthusiastically.

China's pride in its patent portfolio may also be premature: while consortia have already formed to define 6G, and bodies like the GSM Association and International Telecommunications Union have started talking about it, a formal standard is not expected to emerge until late in the 2020s. ®


China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has defined type of silicon companies it is willing to offer tax credits – and even small outfits are invited to apply if they have some patents in their pockets.

The tax relief is part of a group of measures snappily titled "Several Policies to Promote the High-quality Development of the Integrated Circuit Industry and Software Industry in the New Era."

The credits will be offered to companies pulling in more than 10 to 20 million yuan (US$1.5m to $3m) sales revenue in a year, depending on what they are selling.

Continue readingIt doesn't really matter how many of us gripe about Google, nothing can stop it printing billions of dollars Profit, sales soar as giant seemingly scales beyond our perception of reality and scrutiny of society

Google-parent Alphabet generated $55.3bn in the first three months of 2021, a 34 per cent increase from the year-ago quarter that exceeded financial analysts' expectations and lifted company shares in after-hours trading today.

Net income from Q1 more than doubled, rising from $6.8bn a year ago to $17.9bn, putting earnings per share (EPS) at $26.29.

Wall Street analysts on average had been looking for revenue and EPS more along the lines of $51.68bn and $15.88 respectively. Alphabet's earnings beat added about 4.5 per cent to its share price once the earnings report was released, a move magnified perhaps by the announcement of a $50bn stock repurchase plan.

Continue readingHow HPC should mean high performance storage, too Big data shouldn’t mean slow answers

Sponsored When you’re asking big questions, you really don’t want to have to trade off accuracy and insight for speed.

In bioinformatics or pharmaceuticals research, the ability to sequence a genome in hours as opposed to weeks or months can dramatically accelerate innovation when it comes to spotting new disease variants or developing new vaccines or other treatments.

The development and training of self-driving vehicles generates vast amounts of data – in the region of 64TB per vehicle per day – which must be rapidly aggregated and prepped before it can be fed into the AI models underpinning autonomous driving technology.

Continue readingFirst Coinbase, now Basecamp: Should workplaces ban political talk on internal corporate platforms? 'You shouldn't have to wonder if staying out of it means you're complicit, or wading into it means you're a target'

Poll Project management software maker Basecamp has come under fire for banning its employees from having “societal and political discussions” using their internal work accounts.

The Chicago-based outfit announced a number of changes to its workplace on Monday, including getting rid of peer-performance reviews, disbanding all committees, and cutting fitness and wellness benefits in exchange for a wedge of cash.

But the rule that has received the most backlash from its own staff and critics outside the business is the one that discourages workers talking about sensitive issues like politics openly at work. Specifically, staff were told to "refrain" from using the company's internal Basecamp deployment "to discuss societal politics at work effective immediately."

Continue readingState of Maine lays off 15 independent consultants on $13k a month amid efforts to implement troubled Workday system Vendor claims government failed to provide 'clear direction' for the project

The US State of Maine has laid off 15 independent IT contractors, each paid $13,000 a month, who were working on its paused project to implement a new Workday HR and finance system, which is at least two years late and millions of dollars over budget.

What exactly the contractors were doing during March is open to question since Workday suspended the project in February, owing to a contract dispute with the administration.

Nonetheless, those techies-for-hire got an average of $13,000 each, at a rate $108 per hour, according to Kirsten Figueroa, commissioner of the Maine Department of Administrative and Financial Services.

Continue readingDon't blame rural carriers for buying Huawei, says FCC Commissioner. They couldn't afford the top-shelf stuff Cites extremely nascent OpenRAN as country's great hope

Smaller carriers and networks are the weakest link in America’s telecommunications supply chain, FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks claimed while speaking at a supply chain integrity workshop.

“I’ve spoken to many rural wireless carriers about how they came to purchase Huawei and ZTE equipment in the first place. While they did so legally and in good faith, concerns about this equipment aren’t exactly new,” he said, noting a nearly decade-old bipartisan report from the House Intelligence Committee that urged carriers to avoid procuring kit from the two Chinese vendors.

Rural carriers bought this gear because of financial limitations. Unable to take advantage of the same bulk discounts enjoyed by larger outfits like AT&T and Verizon, and with a smaller user-base, the comparatively affordable kit offered by Huawei and ZTE looked more attractive as a result.

Continue readingHere's what Russia's SVR spy agency does when it breaks into your network, says US CISA infosec agency Email provider cock.li called out for harbouring snooping personas

Following attribution of the SolarWinds supply chain attack to Russia's APT29, the US CISA infosec agency has published a list of the spies' known tactics – including a penchant for using a naughtily named email provider.

APT29* is the Western infosec world's codename for what we now know is the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service, known by its Russian acronym SVR.

As well as publishing a list of things US counterintelligence know about their Russian offensive counterparts, CISA has also added some advice on how to avoid these common Russian intelligence compromise tactics.

Continue readingUK government resists pressure to hold statutory inquiry into Post Office Horizon scandal MPs unite behind call to hold those responsible to account, but minister says it would take too long

The UK government has resisted calls for statutory public inquiries into the Post Office Horizon scandal in which subpostmasters were wrongly prosecuted over accounting flaws in Fujitsu-built software.

Following last week's Court of Appeal ruling which quashed 39 convictions of Post Office employees, MPs today pressed the government to hold a full public inquiry into the matter.

Shadow minister for science, research and digital Chi Onwurah told MPs that the government's inquiry into the Horizon scandal, announced in September 2020 and to be led by former High Court judge Sir Wyn Williams, would be toothless and could even lead to a whitewash as postmasters had been clear that they would fail to recognise and participate in such an inquiry.

Continue readingShadow over Fedora 34 as maintainer of Java packages quits with some choice words for Red Hat and Eclipse But hey, the release looks OK

Fedora 34, a feature-packed new release of Red Hat's leading edge Linux distribution, was released today, though the main Java package maintainer has quit, urging "affected maintainers to drop dependencies on Java."

Fedora 34 is used by Red Hat to try out new features that are likely to end up in first CentOS Stream and then Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), the commercial offering.

What is new in Fedora 34? The full list of changes is here and includes:

Continue readingTerror of the adtech industry iOS 14.5 has landed, and Siri can answer your calls ... though she/he can't hang up Good news for users with disabilities, though there's room for improvement

Point releases typically come and go without much fanfare. By their very nature, they're incremental, bringing modest performance and security updates, and not much else. The latest version of Apple's mobile operating system, iOS 14.5, released yesterday, is different.

Why? Three words: App Tracking Transparency (ATT). First announced last year, ATT forces apps to disclose how they collect user data, and actively request the consent of end-users through a simple pop-up dialog box.

Apple has described this as a fundamental privacy feature, which will curb the excesses of some particularly data-hungry platforms.

Continue readingTraffic lights, who needs 'em? Lucky Kentucky residents up in arms over first roundabout Is it yield to the left or just ram my way through any which way?

From Swindon's insane five circles in a circle to the insurance-clause-generating12-lane monster around the Arc de Triomphe, the roundabout has been easing congestion helping local governments across Europe save their pennies for decades.

However, it really seems to be grinding gears in northeastern Kentucky, where denizens have seen their first one installed by state highway agency, KYTC.

The mini-roundabout, at the intersection of Routes 60 & 801, was originally a four-way stop, with 4,000 cars passing through it every day.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3sYxzE3