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Huawei tells the FCC it can't force US carriers to scrap its gear – that's Congress's job
Thursday, 15 April 2021 04:45

HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 02:00:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3d8457b0a86becd5ff63eecabee7d2555a388b9b/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/9bdd333725c33504c7a191542168a72c58eccc2b/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/9bdd333725c33504c7a191542168a72c58eccc2b/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 02:00:09 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 097a01470b00002b0e5223e000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6409d184deed2b0e-SYD Huawei tells the FCC it can't force US carriers to scrap its gear – that's Congress's job • The Register

We're sure the comms watchdog will take that on board


Huawei has argued that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) cannot force US carriers to remove its equipment from their networks, and can only reimburse those that voluntarily choose to do so.

The filing [PDF] made by the Chinese giant to the FCC is yet another salvo in the ongoing fight for Huawei's survival in the US carrier market. Although Huawei has never really had much of a foothold with the main carriers (AT&T, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, and Dish Wireless), the company previously enjoyed a degree of popularity with smaller networks serving rural areas.

In November 2019, the FCC issued a prohibition against rural carriers using federal subsidies to acquire new equipment from so-called high-risk vendors, including Huawei. The following February, the Senate unanimously passed legislation that allocated $1bn to rip and replace existing hardware. This pot was expanded to $1.9bn last December as part of the second stimulus bill, passed during the final months of the Trump US presidency.

The groundwork for these actions came in May 2019, when Trump issued an executive order giving the Secretary of Commerce powers to intervene in transactions that pose "an unacceptable risk" to US national security. Around the same time, the Trump administration also placed Huawei on an entity list, limiting its access to US components and technologies, and preventing it from producing consumer and carrier hardware on its previous scales.

In its filing, Huawei argued the FCC lacked the authority to mandate the removal of equipment. Such powers, it said, come from Congress. Neither the Secure Networks Act, nor the second stimulus bill (known formally as the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021), contains such authorisation. Rather, they just put the cash on the table.

Other carriers and industry trade associations also made comments to the FCC on the matter, raising arguments on the basis that the allocated funds are unlikely to be sufficient to cover the scope of replacing existing equipment.

In its reply to the commission [PDF], the Rural Wireless Association argued that Congress needs to allocate more money, especially after the FCC proposed changing the eligibility criteria to include carriers with under 10 million subscribers.

"Eligible participants are charged with removing all Huawei and ZTE equipment to secure their networks. However, there will likely not be sufficient funds for every Reimbursement Program applicant, including eligible RWA members who participated in the FCC's initial data collection process," it said.

The Register has contacted Huawei for comment. The company strenuously maintains it is not a security threat, and operates independently from the Chinese government.

It's unlikely we'll see a reversal by the Biden administration from the Trump administration's stance on Huawei. This is one of those rare topics where both parties are in alignment. Lobbying efforts against governments perceived as too gentle with Huawei (including the UK) have come from both sides of the aisle. Appropriations bills designed to remove Huawei's presence from the US telco market have enjoyed the enthusiasm of both Republicans and Democrats.

Huawei is gradually placing less and less emphasis on carrier sales, in part due to supply chain difficulties (uncertainty over its access to chips was the primary reason for its UK ban) and shrinking access to foreign markets.

Instead, the company has committed to focusing more on cloud and software products, which are less dependent on a steady access to parts, as well as niche industrial telecommunications sales (private networks to the mining sector, for example).

On the consumer front, it's a similar story. Huawei is placing less emphasis on smartphone sales, with PCs and lifestyle products (headphones, speakers, wearables, and so on) filling the gap. ®


TSMC this week warned the ongoing global shortage of semiconductor supplies will probably continue throughout this year and next.

CEO C.C Wei confirmed to analysts on the chip manufacturing giant's financial earnings call that it will invest $100bn in building more manufacturing plants and hiring thousands of engineers to step up production and capacity rates, though it's going to take time.

"To install the capacity, it won't be available until 2023," Wei said. "This year and next year I still expect capacity to tighten more. In 2023, I hope that we can offer more capacity to support our customers, and in time start to see the supply chain's tightening released a little bit."

Continue readingWalmart’s Indian outpost FlipKart picks industrial giant’s India-US joint venture for Chennai data center E-commerce wing to also get a huge fulfillment center for Q3 2022

Indian e-commerce company FlipKart, majority owned by US behemoth Walmart, has chosen AdaniConneX to build its third data center in Chennai. It is expected to be one of the largest private cloud deployments in the country,

AdaniConneX is a joint venture between Adani Enterprises, one of India’s largest multi-infrastructure organizations, and global data center operator EdgeConneX. The two formed a partnership in February to develop and operate both full scale and edge data centers throughout India, largely powered by renewable energy. The joint venture aims to develop 1GW of data center capacity over the next 10 years.

Meanwhile, affiliate Adani Logistics Limited will build and lease FlipKart an almost 50,000-square-metre fulfillment center in its Mumbai logistics hub. The facility, slated for operation in the third quarter of next year, will potentially store up to 10 million units of inventory and create about 2,500 jobs.

Continue readingMobile app security standard for IoT, VPNs proposed by group backed by Big Tech ioXt Alliance aims to bring 'transparency and visibility'

On Thursday the ioXt Alliance, an Internet of Things (IoT) security trade group backed by some of the biggest names in the business, introduced a set of baseline standards for mobile apps, in the hope that IoT security may someday be a bit less of a dumpster fire.

The announcement of the new Mobile Application Profile [PDF], a certification program covering best practices and requirements to keep mobile apps safer than the low bar of vendor discretion, comes from the collaboration of more than 20 ioXt member companies like Amazon, Comcast, Google, and others.

"This security baseline helps mitigate against common threats and reduces the probability of significant vulnerabilities," said Brooke Davis and Eugene Liderman, from Google's Android security and privacy team, in a blog post.

Continue readingZorin OS 16 beta claims largest built-in app library 'of any open source desktop ever' Linux for Windows switchers: smooth user experience, if users steer clear of Windows apps on Wine

Zorin OS 16 Linux has moved into beta, promising improved performance and a more extensive application Store covering Flathub and Snap as well as old-style repositories.

Zorin is a Linux distribution aimed at switchers from Windows or Mac, and endeavours to offer a polished user experience and a minimum of fuss. It is offered in both free and commercial versions, with the paid-for Ultimate Edition priced at £39 ($53), and free Core, Lite and Education editions.

The Lite edition uses the XFCE minimalist desktop, while the others have a custom GNOME-based desktop GUI. The extras in the Ultimate edition are additional desktop layouts, one imitating macOS, additional bundled applications and games, and installation support. A note on “why does it cost” puts the emphasis on supporting the project rather than the value to the user.

Continue readingEver wondered what it's like working for Microsoft? Leaked survey shines a light on how those at the code coalface feel Lowest scoring sections were 'performance' and 'deal', but it looks like it could be a lot worse

You aren't the only one feeling like you're giving more than you're getting from your employer – a chunk of Microsofties are of the same opnion.

A leaked employee survey seen by Business Insider gives an insight into what it is like to toil within the walls of Redmond.

Microsoft itself did not wish to comment on the poll, it being leaked and all, but the company conducts such surveys annually.

Continue readingDeno 1.9 update includes proposal cold-shouldered in February, now hyped as '3x faster' performance bump Plus HTTP/2 web server written in Rust

Deno 1.9 hit the streets this week touting new features including an HTTP/2 server written in Rust.

An alternative to Node.js, Deno is a runtime for TypeScript and JavaScript on the server, based on the V8 JavaScript engine also used by Google Chrome. It was created by the original developer of Node.js, Ryan Dahl, to improve on what he saw as mistakes in Node.js. A clue to the name may be found in the code "node".split("").sort().join("");.

Deno has always provided an embedded web server, std/http, written in TypeScript. According to the Deno team, "std/http's major down side is that it is HTTP/1.1 only – with no easy path forward towards HTTP/2." The solution was to adapt Hyper, an HTTP/2 server coded in Rust, to become Deno's web server. Deno itself was built in Rust. The new server "improves hello-world throughput by 48 per cent," according to the team, though the API is not yet stable.

Continue readingOracle pumps $1.2bn into Nashville campus as search for southern comfort goes on Mayor thrilled with $175m up front for Guitar Town infrastructure projects

Oracle is continuing its journey into the heart of the southern United States with a $1.2bn investment in a new campus in Nashville, set to create 8,500 new jobs.

Big Red's new base in Tennessee is set to include 1.2 million square feet of office space along the East Bank of the Cumberland River.

"We are thrilled that Oracle is ready to make a billion-dollar bet on Nashville," Mayor John Cooper said in a news release. "Oracle will bring a record number of high-paying jobs to Nashville and they will pay upfront all the city's infrastructure costs. This is a huge win for our city."

Continue readingPigeon fanciers in a flap over Brexit quarantine flock-up, seek exemption from EU laws It won't fly. 'We are collateral damage'

Things have taken a tern for the worse for the Royal Pigeon Racing Association, which is seeking an exemption from the EU for a law that takes flight tomorrow, so their birds can participate in a long distance European race.

In the trans-Channel races, the UK flying rats birds are released from France, after which they wing it across the water in an attempt to beat each other and previous speed records. The new EU animal control regulation [PDF], which comes into effect on 16 April, is in-heron-tly a problem for the fanciers because their feathered friends won't be in beak condition to participate. Under the hawk-ward new rule, the birds would need to be quarantined in France for weeks before the race. Participants feel they've been flocked over as their frequent fliers need daily exercise to stay in shape.

Prior to Brexit, Alan Todd, a member of Winlaton Homing Society in Gateshead, explained to the BBC: "They would leave here on Thursday, get to France on Friday and race back to Britain on Saturday."

Continue readingIt was Russia wot did it: SolarWinds hack was done by Kremlin's APT29 crew, say UK and US And Positive Technologies has been slapped with American sanctions

Russia’s infamous APT 29, aka Cozy Bear, was behind the SolarWinds Orion attack, the US and UK governments said today as America slapped sanctions on Russian infosec companies as well as expelling diplomats from that country’s US embassy.

One of the sanctioned companies is Positive Technologies, familiar in the West for, among other things, in-depth research exposing vulnerabilities in Intel’s hardware security architecture.

Formal attribution of the SolarWind hacks, echoing tentative findings made by Kaspersky Lab, came in a US Treasury Department statement issued this afternoon.

Continue readingUniversity of Hertfordshire pulls the plug on, well, everything after cyber attack Another UK institution topples at the hands of miscreants

The University of Hertfordshire has fallen victim to a cyber attack that has resulted in the establishment pulling all its systems offline to deal with the situation.

The result has been a suspension of all online teaching today and in-person, on-campus teaching only happening if computer access is not required. The university's Wi-Fi is down and there is no student access (either in-person or remote) to its computer facilities.

A look at the British university's status page makes for grim reading. Last updated 12 hours ago (at time of writing) even cloud services, such as Office 365, are disrupted. VPN access and data storage are also offline as well as email and the University Business Systems.

Continue readingLast chance to grab an iPhone Mini as savvy analyst reckons Apple will scrap it next year Incoming iPhone 13 could be final slimline version

All good things come to an end. And pointless things, too, with Apple reportedly planning to discontinue the iPhone Mini after the next iteration expected later this year.

The warning came from Ming-Chi Kuo, a financial analyst with a track record for correctly predicting Apple's product roadmap. Per his sources, Apple plans to launch four handsets in 2022: two each with 6.1 inches of screen real estate, and a further two measuring 6.7 inches.

The iPhone Mini, with its diminutive 5.4-inch display, was conspicuously absent from his research notes. But this might not be much of a surprise. Although Apple hasn't offered a model-by-model sales breakdown of the iPhone 12, it is believed that consumer appetite for the smaller iPhone 12 Mini was tepid at best. We've asked analysts to share shipment data.

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 02:00:10 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/3d8457b0a86becd5ff63eecabee7d2555a388b9b/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/9bdd333725c33504c7a191542168a72c58eccc2b/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/9bdd333725c33504c7a191542168a72c58eccc2b/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 02:00:09 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy02us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 097a01470b00002b0e5223e000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 6409d184deed2b0e-SYD Huawei tells the FCC it can't force US carriers to scrap its gear – that's Congress's job • The Register

We're sure the comms watchdog will take that on board


Huawei has argued that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) cannot force US carriers to remove its equipment from their networks, and can only reimburse those that voluntarily choose to do so.

The filing [PDF] made by the Chinese giant to the FCC is yet another salvo in the ongoing fight for Huawei's survival in the US carrier market. Although Huawei has never really had much of a foothold with the main carriers (AT&T, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, and Dish Wireless), the company previously enjoyed a degree of popularity with smaller networks serving rural areas.

In November 2019, the FCC issued a prohibition against rural carriers using federal subsidies to acquire new equipment from so-called high-risk vendors, including Huawei. The following February, the Senate unanimously passed legislation that allocated $1bn to rip and replace existing hardware. This pot was expanded to $1.9bn last December as part of the second stimulus bill, passed during the final months of the Trump US presidency.

The groundwork for these actions came in May 2019, when Trump issued an executive order giving the Secretary of Commerce powers to intervene in transactions that pose "an unacceptable risk" to US national security. Around the same time, the Trump administration also placed Huawei on an entity list, limiting its access to US components and technologies, and preventing it from producing consumer and carrier hardware on its previous scales.

In its filing, Huawei argued the FCC lacked the authority to mandate the removal of equipment. Such powers, it said, come from Congress. Neither the Secure Networks Act, nor the second stimulus bill (known formally as the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021), contains such authorisation. Rather, they just put the cash on the table.

Other carriers and industry trade associations also made comments to the FCC on the matter, raising arguments on the basis that the allocated funds are unlikely to be sufficient to cover the scope of replacing existing equipment.

In its reply to the commission [PDF], the Rural Wireless Association argued that Congress needs to allocate more money, especially after the FCC proposed changing the eligibility criteria to include carriers with under 10 million subscribers.

"Eligible participants are charged with removing all Huawei and ZTE equipment to secure their networks. However, there will likely not be sufficient funds for every Reimbursement Program applicant, including eligible RWA members who participated in the FCC's initial data collection process," it said.

The Register has contacted Huawei for comment. The company strenuously maintains it is not a security threat, and operates independently from the Chinese government.

It's unlikely we'll see a reversal by the Biden administration from the Trump administration's stance on Huawei. This is one of those rare topics where both parties are in alignment. Lobbying efforts against governments perceived as too gentle with Huawei (including the UK) have come from both sides of the aisle. Appropriations bills designed to remove Huawei's presence from the US telco market have enjoyed the enthusiasm of both Republicans and Democrats.

Huawei is gradually placing less and less emphasis on carrier sales, in part due to supply chain difficulties (uncertainty over its access to chips was the primary reason for its UK ban) and shrinking access to foreign markets.

Instead, the company has committed to focusing more on cloud and software products, which are less dependent on a steady access to parts, as well as niche industrial telecommunications sales (private networks to the mining sector, for example).

On the consumer front, it's a similar story. Huawei is placing less emphasis on smartphone sales, with PCs and lifestyle products (headphones, speakers, wearables, and so on) filling the gap. ®


TSMC this week warned the ongoing global shortage of semiconductor supplies will probably continue throughout this year and next.

CEO C.C Wei confirmed to analysts on the chip manufacturing giant's financial earnings call that it will invest $100bn in building more manufacturing plants and hiring thousands of engineers to step up production and capacity rates, though it's going to take time.

"To install the capacity, it won't be available until 2023," Wei said. "This year and next year I still expect capacity to tighten more. In 2023, I hope that we can offer more capacity to support our customers, and in time start to see the supply chain's tightening released a little bit."

Continue readingWalmart’s Indian outpost FlipKart picks industrial giant’s India-US joint venture for Chennai data center E-commerce wing to also get a huge fulfillment center for Q3 2022

Indian e-commerce company FlipKart, majority owned by US behemoth Walmart, has chosen AdaniConneX to build its third data center in Chennai. It is expected to be one of the largest private cloud deployments in the country,

AdaniConneX is a joint venture between Adani Enterprises, one of India’s largest multi-infrastructure organizations, and global data center operator EdgeConneX. The two formed a partnership in February to develop and operate both full scale and edge data centers throughout India, largely powered by renewable energy. The joint venture aims to develop 1GW of data center capacity over the next 10 years.

Meanwhile, affiliate Adani Logistics Limited will build and lease FlipKart an almost 50,000-square-metre fulfillment center in its Mumbai logistics hub. The facility, slated for operation in the third quarter of next year, will potentially store up to 10 million units of inventory and create about 2,500 jobs.

Continue readingMobile app security standard for IoT, VPNs proposed by group backed by Big Tech ioXt Alliance aims to bring 'transparency and visibility'

On Thursday the ioXt Alliance, an Internet of Things (IoT) security trade group backed by some of the biggest names in the business, introduced a set of baseline standards for mobile apps, in the hope that IoT security may someday be a bit less of a dumpster fire.

The announcement of the new Mobile Application Profile [PDF], a certification program covering best practices and requirements to keep mobile apps safer than the low bar of vendor discretion, comes from the collaboration of more than 20 ioXt member companies like Amazon, Comcast, Google, and others.

"This security baseline helps mitigate against common threats and reduces the probability of significant vulnerabilities," said Brooke Davis and Eugene Liderman, from Google's Android security and privacy team, in a blog post.

Continue readingZorin OS 16 beta claims largest built-in app library 'of any open source desktop ever' Linux for Windows switchers: smooth user experience, if users steer clear of Windows apps on Wine

Zorin OS 16 Linux has moved into beta, promising improved performance and a more extensive application Store covering Flathub and Snap as well as old-style repositories.

Zorin is a Linux distribution aimed at switchers from Windows or Mac, and endeavours to offer a polished user experience and a minimum of fuss. It is offered in both free and commercial versions, with the paid-for Ultimate Edition priced at £39 ($53), and free Core, Lite and Education editions.

The Lite edition uses the XFCE minimalist desktop, while the others have a custom GNOME-based desktop GUI. The extras in the Ultimate edition are additional desktop layouts, one imitating macOS, additional bundled applications and games, and installation support. A note on “why does it cost” puts the emphasis on supporting the project rather than the value to the user.

Continue readingEver wondered what it's like working for Microsoft? Leaked survey shines a light on how those at the code coalface feel Lowest scoring sections were 'performance' and 'deal', but it looks like it could be a lot worse

You aren't the only one feeling like you're giving more than you're getting from your employer – a chunk of Microsofties are of the same opnion.

A leaked employee survey seen by Business Insider gives an insight into what it is like to toil within the walls of Redmond.

Microsoft itself did not wish to comment on the poll, it being leaked and all, but the company conducts such surveys annually.

Continue readingDeno 1.9 update includes proposal cold-shouldered in February, now hyped as '3x faster' performance bump Plus HTTP/2 web server written in Rust

Deno 1.9 hit the streets this week touting new features including an HTTP/2 server written in Rust.

An alternative to Node.js, Deno is a runtime for TypeScript and JavaScript on the server, based on the V8 JavaScript engine also used by Google Chrome. It was created by the original developer of Node.js, Ryan Dahl, to improve on what he saw as mistakes in Node.js. A clue to the name may be found in the code "node".split("").sort().join("");.

Deno has always provided an embedded web server, std/http, written in TypeScript. According to the Deno team, "std/http's major down side is that it is HTTP/1.1 only – with no easy path forward towards HTTP/2." The solution was to adapt Hyper, an HTTP/2 server coded in Rust, to become Deno's web server. Deno itself was built in Rust. The new server "improves hello-world throughput by 48 per cent," according to the team, though the API is not yet stable.

Continue readingOracle pumps $1.2bn into Nashville campus as search for southern comfort goes on Mayor thrilled with $175m up front for Guitar Town infrastructure projects

Oracle is continuing its journey into the heart of the southern United States with a $1.2bn investment in a new campus in Nashville, set to create 8,500 new jobs.

Big Red's new base in Tennessee is set to include 1.2 million square feet of office space along the East Bank of the Cumberland River.

"We are thrilled that Oracle is ready to make a billion-dollar bet on Nashville," Mayor John Cooper said in a news release. "Oracle will bring a record number of high-paying jobs to Nashville and they will pay upfront all the city's infrastructure costs. This is a huge win for our city."

Continue readingPigeon fanciers in a flap over Brexit quarantine flock-up, seek exemption from EU laws It won't fly. 'We are collateral damage'

Things have taken a tern for the worse for the Royal Pigeon Racing Association, which is seeking an exemption from the EU for a law that takes flight tomorrow, so their birds can participate in a long distance European race.

In the trans-Channel races, the UK flying rats birds are released from France, after which they wing it across the water in an attempt to beat each other and previous speed records. The new EU animal control regulation [PDF], which comes into effect on 16 April, is in-heron-tly a problem for the fanciers because their feathered friends won't be in beak condition to participate. Under the hawk-ward new rule, the birds would need to be quarantined in France for weeks before the race. Participants feel they've been flocked over as their frequent fliers need daily exercise to stay in shape.

Prior to Brexit, Alan Todd, a member of Winlaton Homing Society in Gateshead, explained to the BBC: "They would leave here on Thursday, get to France on Friday and race back to Britain on Saturday."

Continue readingIt was Russia wot did it: SolarWinds hack was done by Kremlin's APT29 crew, say UK and US And Positive Technologies has been slapped with American sanctions

Russia’s infamous APT 29, aka Cozy Bear, was behind the SolarWinds Orion attack, the US and UK governments said today as America slapped sanctions on Russian infosec companies as well as expelling diplomats from that country’s US embassy.

One of the sanctioned companies is Positive Technologies, familiar in the West for, among other things, in-depth research exposing vulnerabilities in Intel’s hardware security architecture.

Formal attribution of the SolarWind hacks, echoing tentative findings made by Kaspersky Lab, came in a US Treasury Department statement issued this afternoon.

Continue readingUniversity of Hertfordshire pulls the plug on, well, everything after cyber attack Another UK institution topples at the hands of miscreants

The University of Hertfordshire has fallen victim to a cyber attack that has resulted in the establishment pulling all its systems offline to deal with the situation.

The result has been a suspension of all online teaching today and in-person, on-campus teaching only happening if computer access is not required. The university's Wi-Fi is down and there is no student access (either in-person or remote) to its computer facilities.

A look at the British university's status page makes for grim reading. Last updated 12 hours ago (at time of writing) even cloud services, such as Office 365, are disrupted. VPN access and data storage are also offline as well as email and the University Business Systems.

Continue readingLast chance to grab an iPhone Mini as savvy analyst reckons Apple will scrap it next year Incoming iPhone 13 could be final slimline version

All good things come to an end. And pointless things, too, with Apple reportedly planning to discontinue the iPhone Mini after the next iteration expected later this year.

The warning came from Ming-Chi Kuo, a financial analyst with a track record for correctly predicting Apple's product roadmap. Per his sources, Apple plans to launch four handsets in 2022: two each with 6.1 inches of screen real estate, and a further two measuring 6.7 inches.

The iPhone Mini, with its diminutive 5.4-inch display, was conspicuously absent from his research notes. But this might not be much of a surprise. Although Apple hasn't offered a model-by-model sales breakdown of the iPhone 12, it is believed that consumer appetite for the smaller iPhone 12 Mini was tepid at best. We've asked analysts to share shipment data.

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/32gxalH