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SpaceX wants to slap Starlink internet terminals on planes, trucks, and boats – but Tesla owners need not apply
Wednesday, 10 March 2021 01:43

HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 10 Mar 2021 01:00:09 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/1b387ba30041f22d29b5521abbd2ecfcece4e626/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/9277d5e4a37a3331652249e94986076b1fc57573/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/9277d5e4a37a3331652249e94986076b1fc57573/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 10 Mar 2021 01:00:09 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 08bb3f0a3b0000df2cc988c000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 62d89abd2e9cdf2c-MEL SpaceX wants to slap Starlink internet terminals on planes, trucks, and boats – but Tesla owners need not apply • The Register

They're 'much too big' says Musk


Elon Musk's satellite internet constellation biz, Starlink, wants to sell its end-user station devices and services for use in vehicles, judging by a filing with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The filing, submitted by SpaceX, began by noting the authorisation the company has received to launch over 4,400 non-geostationary orbit satellites. More than 1,100 have been launched so far "to bring high-speed, reliable, and affordable broadband service to consumers in the United States and around the world, including areas underserved or currently unserved by existing networks."

Thus far, the company (or rather its sister company, SpaceX Services) was granted a licence for the operation of up to one million end-user stations. Although they are usually placed in fixed locations, the company now wants to be licensed to mount the devices on vehicles (Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations or "VMESs"), vessels (Earth Stations on Vessels or "ESVs") and aircraft (Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft or "ESAAs".)

SpaceX wants to slap Starlink internet terminals on planes, trucks, and boats – but Tesla owners need not apply

SpaceX small print on Starlink insists no Earth government has authority or sovereignty over Martian activities

READ MORE

The hardware will, according to the filing, be "electrically identical to its previously authorized consumer user terminals" but feature mountings more suited to the targeted vehicle than the outside of a remote barn in a bit of the US neglected by internet providers.

It also promised the unhelpfully monikered E-SIMs (not embedded SIMs, as Reg readers might know them, but Earth Stations in Motion) would be put into customers' kit by "qualified installers who have an understanding of the antenna's radiation environment and the measures best suited to maximize protection of the general public and persons operating the vehicle and equipment."

"No longer are users willing to forego connectivity while on the move," intoned SpaceX, insisting in its filing the granting of its application would most definitely be in the public interest. The eye-popping cost to passengers of internet access from aircraft as well as a keenness for connectivity for freight is also likely a factor.

In an Attachment Narrative, SpaceX explained that the broader licensing would "promote competition in the market for in-motion broadband services, to the benefit of drivers, ship operators, and air travelers in the United States and abroad."

However, one set of customers unlikely to benefit from the company's hoped-for internet-on-the-move will be Tesla drivers. Sticking a terminal on top of one of Elon Musk's electric jalopies would probably spoil the sleek lines of the vehicle. The company's boss let fans of the vehicles down gently:

The application was filed as SpaceX continues its impressive launch cadence. The next batch of 60 Starlink satellites are due to go up tomorrow morning at 02:58 UTC atop a booster previously used to send NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station. The mission is scheduled for less than a week after the previous Starlink launch. ®


Name True, iCloud access false: Exceptional problem locks online storage account, stumps Apple customer service You're naming yourself wrong?

An iCloud customer says she spent more than six hours on the phone to Apple after being locked out of the service because her name is apparently incompatible with the application code.

"Actor, author, artist" Rachel True posted on Twitter about an error with the iCloud application, an unhandled exception with "Type error: cannot set value `true` to property `lastName`."

It seems that her name was interpreted as a Boolean value instead of a string, a common programming problem especially in dynamic languages which are more flexible about variable types.

Continue reading
Remember that day in 2020 when you were asked to get the business working from home – by tomorrow? IT pros from orgs large and small tell The Reg the tech delivered, mostly, tho couriers, home Wi-Fi suddenly became their problem

Covid Logfile Brianna Haley was given one day to be ready to roll out Zoom for 13,000 users at over 1,000 sites.

Haley* is a project analyst for a large healthcare provider that, as COVID-19 marched across the world in March 2020, realised imminent lockdowns meant it would soon be unable to consult with patients.

And no consultations meant no revenue.

"I got called into a meeting at 7:30 or 8:30 on Monday morning and was told we had to get Zoom done by tomorrow," Haley recalls.

Continue reading
Just when you thought it was safe to enjoy a beer: Beware the downloaded patch applied in haste Let us tell you a tale of the Mailman's Apprentice

Who, Me? The weekend is over and Monday is here. Celebrate your IT prowess with another there-but-for-the-grace confession from the Who, Me? archives.

Our tale, from a reader the Regomiser has elected to dub "Simon", takes us back to the early part of this century and to an anonymous antipodean institution of learning.

Simon was working at the local Student Union (or "guild" as the locals called it), which was having problems with uppity education staff censoring the emissions of students. Simon was therefore commissioned to set up a fully independent newsletter.

"We had scored access to the Oracle user database," he said, "but only via the awful Filemaker Mac database. So I built a bridge to export it out to MySQL.

Continue reading
So it appears some of you really don't want us to use the word 'hacker' when we really mean 'criminal' The votes have been cast and counted... and it's a landslide

Register debate Last week, we argued over whether or not the media, including El Reg, should stop using the word hacker as a pejorative.

This debate came about after infosec pro Alyssa Miller and a few others from the Hacking Is Not A Crime movement politely asked Register vultures on Twitter to quit using the h-word as a lazy shorthand for criminal.

We said we'd think about it. And we thought about it, and we thought about it some more. And in the end, since we're writing for you, we decided to put it to the audience: we published an article for and an article against the proposal, and let everyone vote for whichever side they agreed with.

On Wednesday, Alyssa argued in favor of the media no longer using hacker as a pejorative.

Continue reading
The torture garden of Microsoft Exchange: Grant us the serenity to accept what they cannot EOL Time to fix those legacy evils, though.... right?

Column It is the monster which corrupts all it touches. It is an energy-sucking vampire that thrives on the pain it promotes. It cannot be killed, but grows afresh as each manifestation outdoes the last in awfulness and horror. It is Microsoft Exchange and its drooling minion, Outlook.

Let us start with the most numerous of its victims, the end users. Chances are, you are one. You may be numbed by lifelong exposure, your pain receptors and critical faculties burned out though years of corrosion. You might be like me, an habitual avoider whose work requirements periodically force its tentacles back in through the orifices.

I have recently started to use it through its web interface, where it doesn’t update the unread flags, hides attachments, multiplies browser instances, leaves temp files all over my download directory, tangles threads, botches searchers and so on.

Continue reading
Delayed, overbudget and broken. Of course Microsoft's finest would be found in NASA's Orion In Space No One Can Hear You Scream (as Windows crashes again)

BORK!BORK!BORK! Getting astronauts to the Moon or Mars is the least of NASA's problems. Persuading Microsoft Windows not to fall over along the way is apparently a far greater challenge.

Spotted by Register reader Scott during a visit to the otherwise excellent Space Center Houston, there is something all too real lurking within the mock-up of the Orion capsule in which NASA hopes to send its astronauts for jaunts beyond low Earth orbit.

Clutched in the hand of a mannequin posed in the capsule's hatch is a reminder of both how old space tech tends to be and a warning for space-farers intending to take Microsoft's finest out for a spin.

Continue reading
Google's ex-boss tells the US it's time to take the gloves off on autonomous weapons Plus: AI Index 2021 report takeaways, Chocolate Factory banished from top ethics conference, and more

In brief US government should avoid hastily banning AI-powered autonomous weapons and instead step up its efforts in developing such systems to keep up with foreign enemies, according to the National Security Commission on AI.

The independent group headed by ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt and funded by the Department of Defense has published its final report advising the White House on how best to advance AI and machine learning to stay ahead of its competitors.

Stretching over 750 pages, the report covers a lot of areas, including retaining talent, the future of warfare, protecting IP, and US semiconductor supply chains.

The most controversial point raised by Schmidt and the other advisors was that America should not turn its back on autonomous AI weapons. The US government should actually be building its own systems to deter other countries from wreaking havoc, it argued. But the development should be carefully monitored to make sure it abides by ethical policies.

Continue reading
Customer comment and contributions no more as Microsoft pulls the plug on Office 365 UserVoice forum No obvious replacement yet either

Microsoft has demonstrated its commitment to customer feedback by, er, shutting down some of its UserVoice forums.

Office 365 looks to have been the victim of last week's cull, although other forums, such as those for Outlook and Skype, continue to be active and a place where Microsoft thought-leaders can ignore customer pleas. (As a case in point: two of the top five requests in Skype Ideas – one of the forums' feedback tools – concern the resurrection of Skype 7. Both received polite brush-offs.)

The UserVoice forums are a handy way for companies to collect feedback on their products, and Microsoft is not the only software biz making use of the platform. Others, such as Box, are also fans.

Back in 2018, Microsoft's Jim Naroski put together an exhaustive list of forums available, from Access to Yammer.

Continue reading
Intel CPU interconnects can be exploited by malware to leak encryption keys and other info, academic study finds Side-channel ring race 'hard to mitigate with existing defenses'

Chip-busting boffins in America have devised yet another way to filch sensitive data by exploiting Intel's processor design choices.

Doctoral student Riccardo Paccagnella, master's student Licheng Luo, and assistant professor Christopher Fletcher, all from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, delved into the way CPU ring interconnects work, and found they can be abused for side-channel attacks. The upshot is that one application can infer another application's private memory and snoop on the user's key presses.

"It is the first attack to exploit contention on the cross-core interconnect of Intel CPUs," Paccagnella told The Register. "The attack does not rely on sharing memory, cache sets, core-private resources or any specific uncore structures. As a consequence, it is hard to mitigate with existing side channel defenses."

Side-channel attacks, like the 2018 Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, exploit characteristics of modern chip microarchitecture to expose or infer secrets through interaction with a shared computing component or resource.

Continue reading
NASA shows Mars that humans can drive a remote control space tank at .01 km/h Perseverance takes first drive around landing spot named in honor of seminal sci-fi author Octavia E. Butler

NASA’s Perseverance rover trekked across Mars for the first time last Thursday, March 4, 2021.

The vehicle went four whole meters forward, turned 150 degrees to the left, then moved another two-and-a-half meters. The entire drive covered a whopping 6.5 m (21.3 feet) across Martian terrain. The journey took about 33 minutes.

The Register ran that through a calculator and deduces the nuclear powered laser-equipped space tank, aka Perseverance, sped along at the astounding velocity of .01km/h, quite a comedown from the 19,310 km/h at which it entered the red planet’s atmosphere.

In a press release, NASA said:

Continue reading

HTTP/2 200 date: Wed, 10 Mar 2021 01:00:09 GMT content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 link: ; rel=preload; as=script;,/1b387ba30041f22d29b5521abbd2ecfcece4e626/javascript/_.js>; rel=preload; as=script;,/default/9277d5e4a37a3331652249e94986076b1fc57573/scaffolding.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/default/9277d5e4a37a3331652249e94986076b1fc57573/design.css>; rel=preload; as=style;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-700.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin;,/5e49edbd1875f214e0decae1e24b200066780fa8/style/fonts/arimo/arimo-400.latin.woff2>; rel=preload; as=font; crossorigin; cache-control: max-age=0 expires: Wed, 10 Mar 2021 01:00:09 GMT vary: Accept-Encoding x-reg-bofh: pfy01us x-clacks-overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett, Lester Haines cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC cf-request-id: 08bb3f0a3b0000df2cc988c000000001 expect-ct: max-age=604800, report-uri="https://report-uri.cloudflare.com/cdn-cgi/beacon/expect-ct" server: cloudflare cf-ray: 62d89abd2e9cdf2c-MEL SpaceX wants to slap Starlink internet terminals on planes, trucks, and boats – but Tesla owners need not apply • The Register

They're 'much too big' says Musk


Elon Musk's satellite internet constellation biz, Starlink, wants to sell its end-user station devices and services for use in vehicles, judging by a filing with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The filing, submitted by SpaceX, began by noting the authorisation the company has received to launch over 4,400 non-geostationary orbit satellites. More than 1,100 have been launched so far "to bring high-speed, reliable, and affordable broadband service to consumers in the United States and around the world, including areas underserved or currently unserved by existing networks."

Thus far, the company (or rather its sister company, SpaceX Services) was granted a licence for the operation of up to one million end-user stations. Although they are usually placed in fixed locations, the company now wants to be licensed to mount the devices on vehicles (Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations or "VMESs"), vessels (Earth Stations on Vessels or "ESVs") and aircraft (Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft or "ESAAs".)

SpaceX wants to slap Starlink internet terminals on planes, trucks, and boats – but Tesla owners need not apply

SpaceX small print on Starlink insists no Earth government has authority or sovereignty over Martian activities

READ MORE

The hardware will, according to the filing, be "electrically identical to its previously authorized consumer user terminals" but feature mountings more suited to the targeted vehicle than the outside of a remote barn in a bit of the US neglected by internet providers.

It also promised the unhelpfully monikered E-SIMs (not embedded SIMs, as Reg readers might know them, but Earth Stations in Motion) would be put into customers' kit by "qualified installers who have an understanding of the antenna's radiation environment and the measures best suited to maximize protection of the general public and persons operating the vehicle and equipment."

"No longer are users willing to forego connectivity while on the move," intoned SpaceX, insisting in its filing the granting of its application would most definitely be in the public interest. The eye-popping cost to passengers of internet access from aircraft as well as a keenness for connectivity for freight is also likely a factor.

In an Attachment Narrative, SpaceX explained that the broader licensing would "promote competition in the market for in-motion broadband services, to the benefit of drivers, ship operators, and air travelers in the United States and abroad."

However, one set of customers unlikely to benefit from the company's hoped-for internet-on-the-move will be Tesla drivers. Sticking a terminal on top of one of Elon Musk's electric jalopies would probably spoil the sleek lines of the vehicle. The company's boss let fans of the vehicles down gently:

The application was filed as SpaceX continues its impressive launch cadence. The next batch of 60 Starlink satellites are due to go up tomorrow morning at 02:58 UTC atop a booster previously used to send NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station. The mission is scheduled for less than a week after the previous Starlink launch. ®


Name True, iCloud access false: Exceptional problem locks online storage account, stumps Apple customer service You're naming yourself wrong?

An iCloud customer says she spent more than six hours on the phone to Apple after being locked out of the service because her name is apparently incompatible with the application code.

"Actor, author, artist" Rachel True posted on Twitter about an error with the iCloud application, an unhandled exception with "Type error: cannot set value `true` to property `lastName`."

It seems that her name was interpreted as a Boolean value instead of a string, a common programming problem especially in dynamic languages which are more flexible about variable types.

Continue reading
Remember that day in 2020 when you were asked to get the business working from home – by tomorrow? IT pros from orgs large and small tell The Reg the tech delivered, mostly, tho couriers, home Wi-Fi suddenly became their problem

Covid Logfile Brianna Haley was given one day to be ready to roll out Zoom for 13,000 users at over 1,000 sites.

Haley* is a project analyst for a large healthcare provider that, as COVID-19 marched across the world in March 2020, realised imminent lockdowns meant it would soon be unable to consult with patients.

And no consultations meant no revenue.

"I got called into a meeting at 7:30 or 8:30 on Monday morning and was told we had to get Zoom done by tomorrow," Haley recalls.

Continue reading
Just when you thought it was safe to enjoy a beer: Beware the downloaded patch applied in haste Let us tell you a tale of the Mailman's Apprentice

Who, Me? The weekend is over and Monday is here. Celebrate your IT prowess with another there-but-for-the-grace confession from the Who, Me? archives.

Our tale, from a reader the Regomiser has elected to dub "Simon", takes us back to the early part of this century and to an anonymous antipodean institution of learning.

Simon was working at the local Student Union (or "guild" as the locals called it), which was having problems with uppity education staff censoring the emissions of students. Simon was therefore commissioned to set up a fully independent newsletter.

"We had scored access to the Oracle user database," he said, "but only via the awful Filemaker Mac database. So I built a bridge to export it out to MySQL.

Continue reading
So it appears some of you really don't want us to use the word 'hacker' when we really mean 'criminal' The votes have been cast and counted... and it's a landslide

Register debate Last week, we argued over whether or not the media, including El Reg, should stop using the word hacker as a pejorative.

This debate came about after infosec pro Alyssa Miller and a few others from the Hacking Is Not A Crime movement politely asked Register vultures on Twitter to quit using the h-word as a lazy shorthand for criminal.

We said we'd think about it. And we thought about it, and we thought about it some more. And in the end, since we're writing for you, we decided to put it to the audience: we published an article for and an article against the proposal, and let everyone vote for whichever side they agreed with.

On Wednesday, Alyssa argued in favor of the media no longer using hacker as a pejorative.

Continue reading
The torture garden of Microsoft Exchange: Grant us the serenity to accept what they cannot EOL Time to fix those legacy evils, though.... right?

Column It is the monster which corrupts all it touches. It is an energy-sucking vampire that thrives on the pain it promotes. It cannot be killed, but grows afresh as each manifestation outdoes the last in awfulness and horror. It is Microsoft Exchange and its drooling minion, Outlook.

Let us start with the most numerous of its victims, the end users. Chances are, you are one. You may be numbed by lifelong exposure, your pain receptors and critical faculties burned out though years of corrosion. You might be like me, an habitual avoider whose work requirements periodically force its tentacles back in through the orifices.

I have recently started to use it through its web interface, where it doesn’t update the unread flags, hides attachments, multiplies browser instances, leaves temp files all over my download directory, tangles threads, botches searchers and so on.

Continue reading
Delayed, overbudget and broken. Of course Microsoft's finest would be found in NASA's Orion In Space No One Can Hear You Scream (as Windows crashes again)

BORK!BORK!BORK! Getting astronauts to the Moon or Mars is the least of NASA's problems. Persuading Microsoft Windows not to fall over along the way is apparently a far greater challenge.

Spotted by Register reader Scott during a visit to the otherwise excellent Space Center Houston, there is something all too real lurking within the mock-up of the Orion capsule in which NASA hopes to send its astronauts for jaunts beyond low Earth orbit.

Clutched in the hand of a mannequin posed in the capsule's hatch is a reminder of both how old space tech tends to be and a warning for space-farers intending to take Microsoft's finest out for a spin.

Continue reading
Google's ex-boss tells the US it's time to take the gloves off on autonomous weapons Plus: AI Index 2021 report takeaways, Chocolate Factory banished from top ethics conference, and more

In brief US government should avoid hastily banning AI-powered autonomous weapons and instead step up its efforts in developing such systems to keep up with foreign enemies, according to the National Security Commission on AI.

The independent group headed by ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt and funded by the Department of Defense has published its final report advising the White House on how best to advance AI and machine learning to stay ahead of its competitors.

Stretching over 750 pages, the report covers a lot of areas, including retaining talent, the future of warfare, protecting IP, and US semiconductor supply chains.

The most controversial point raised by Schmidt and the other advisors was that America should not turn its back on autonomous AI weapons. The US government should actually be building its own systems to deter other countries from wreaking havoc, it argued. But the development should be carefully monitored to make sure it abides by ethical policies.

Continue reading
Customer comment and contributions no more as Microsoft pulls the plug on Office 365 UserVoice forum No obvious replacement yet either

Microsoft has demonstrated its commitment to customer feedback by, er, shutting down some of its UserVoice forums.

Office 365 looks to have been the victim of last week's cull, although other forums, such as those for Outlook and Skype, continue to be active and a place where Microsoft thought-leaders can ignore customer pleas. (As a case in point: two of the top five requests in Skype Ideas – one of the forums' feedback tools – concern the resurrection of Skype 7. Both received polite brush-offs.)

The UserVoice forums are a handy way for companies to collect feedback on their products, and Microsoft is not the only software biz making use of the platform. Others, such as Box, are also fans.

Back in 2018, Microsoft's Jim Naroski put together an exhaustive list of forums available, from Access to Yammer.

Continue reading
Intel CPU interconnects can be exploited by malware to leak encryption keys and other info, academic study finds Side-channel ring race 'hard to mitigate with existing defenses'

Chip-busting boffins in America have devised yet another way to filch sensitive data by exploiting Intel's processor design choices.

Doctoral student Riccardo Paccagnella, master's student Licheng Luo, and assistant professor Christopher Fletcher, all from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, delved into the way CPU ring interconnects work, and found they can be abused for side-channel attacks. The upshot is that one application can infer another application's private memory and snoop on the user's key presses.

"It is the first attack to exploit contention on the cross-core interconnect of Intel CPUs," Paccagnella told The Register. "The attack does not rely on sharing memory, cache sets, core-private resources or any specific uncore structures. As a consequence, it is hard to mitigate with existing side channel defenses."

Side-channel attacks, like the 2018 Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, exploit characteristics of modern chip microarchitecture to expose or infer secrets through interaction with a shared computing component or resource.

Continue reading
NASA shows Mars that humans can drive a remote control space tank at .01 km/h Perseverance takes first drive around landing spot named in honor of seminal sci-fi author Octavia E. Butler

NASA’s Perseverance rover trekked across Mars for the first time last Thursday, March 4, 2021.

The vehicle went four whole meters forward, turned 150 degrees to the left, then moved another two-and-a-half meters. The entire drive covered a whopping 6.5 m (21.3 feet) across Martian terrain. The journey took about 33 minutes.

The Register ran that through a calculator and deduces the nuclear powered laser-equipped space tank, aka Perseverance, sped along at the astounding velocity of .01km/h, quite a comedown from the 19,310 km/h at which it entered the red planet’s atmosphere.

In a press release, NASA said:

Continue reading

Source: https://bit.ly/3rBC1ZB